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Full text of "Bulletin of Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina"

Archives 

F. D. Bluford Library 

N. ./' T State University 1 ' 

Gre „-o. N. C. 2741 1^ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofagricu19771979 



r H E UNDERGRADUATE BULLET IN 



AND 



S*\CULT(j> 




UNlVt5, 



ORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL 
ND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
REENSBORO 



1977-1979 



Archives 

F. D. BJuford Library 

N. C. A & T State University 

Greensboro, N. C. 27411 



THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOGUE 

VOL. 67, No. 1 AUGUST, 1977 

THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOGUE— Published three times each year in 
August, December and January by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University, 312 North Dudley Street, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411. 

Second Class Postage Permit Applied for at Greensboro, North Carolina 



NORTH CAROLINA 
AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOGUE 
1977-79 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND 

TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

Greensboro 



CONTENTS 

Officers of Administration — The University of North Carolina vii 

Board of Governors ix 

Historical Statement 3 

Board of Trustees 5 

Officers of Administration — North Carolina A. and T. State University . . 5 

Location 7 

Physical Plant 7 

University Buildings 7 

Accreditations and Institutional Memberships 9 

Degree Programs 10 

Nondiscrimination Policy 12 

Admission Policy and Procedure 12 

Admission 16 

Financial Information 16 

Academic Information and Regulations 21 

Academic Retention 24 

Classification of Students 25 

Class Attendance 27 

General Requirements for Graduation 27 

Ferdinand D. Bluford Library 29 

General Information 29 

The Audiovisual Center 29 

Closed Circuit Television 29 

Computer Science Center 30 

Language Laboratory 30 

Reading Center 30 

Institute for Research in Human Resources 30 

The Center for Manpower Research and Training 31 

Transportation Institute 31 

Office of Development and University Relations 31 

Cooperative Education 32 

Greensboro Regional Consortium 32 

Guidance and Counseling Services 32 

Health Services 32 

Food Services 33 

Placement Services 33 

Veterans Affairs and Services 33 

The Memorial Union 33 

Housing 34 

Student Life 34 

Student Personnel Services 34 

Student Organization and Activities 34 

Student Conduct 35 

University Calendar 36 

ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 

The School of Agriculture 39 

Department of Agricultural Economics 42 

Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 47 

Department of Animal Science 51 

Department of Home Economics 61 

Department of Plant Science and Technology 83 



The School of Arts and Sciences 103 

Department of Art 108 

Department of Biology 117 

Department of Chemistry 127 

Department of English 139 

Department of Foreign Languages 151 

Department of History 157 

Department of Mathematics 167 

Department of Music 176 

Department of Physics 194 

Department of Political Science 203 

Department of Psychology 210 

Department of Sociology and Social Service 219 

Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 226 

The School of Business and Economics 237 

Department of Accounting 240 

Department of Business Administration 244 

Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 252 

Department of Economics 259 

Transportation Institute 267 

The School of Education 271 

Department of Education 278 

Department of Educational Media 292 

Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 295 

Department of Adult Education and Community Services 299 

Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 303 

Division of Industrial Education and Technology 315 

Department of Industrial Education 317 

Department of Industrial Technology 327 

Department of Safety and Driver Education 339 

The School of Engineering 345 

Department of Architectural Engineering 348 

Department of Electrical Engineering 355 

Department of Industrial Engineering 358 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 359 

The School of Nursing 371 

The Graduate School 379 

Departments of Military Science and Aerospace Studies 385 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 399 

RELATED SERVICES STAFF 416 

ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA 425 

ENROLLMENT BY STATES 426 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 426 

INDEX 427 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Raymond Howard Dawson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President, 

Academic Affairs 

L. Felix Joyner, A.B., Vice President— Finance 

John L. Sanders, A.B., J.D., Vice President— Planning 

Cleon Franklyn Thompson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President- 
Student Services and Special Programs 

George Eldridge Bair, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of 

Educational Television 
Charles Ray Coble, Jr., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President- 
Planning 

James L. Jenkins, Jr., A.B., Assistant to the President 

Edgar Walton Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Vice President- 
Research and Public Service 

John P. Kennedy, Jr., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 

Arnold Kimsey King, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 

Roscoe D. McMillan, Jr., B.S., Assistant to the President for 

Governmental Affairs 

Richard H. Robinson, Jr., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 

Robert W. Williams, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President- 
Academic Affairs 



The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its 
doors to students at its Chapel Hill campus in 1795. Throughout most of its 
history, it has been governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the Legislature 
and presided over by the Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the Board 
consisted of one hundred elected members and a varying number of ex- 
officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was 
merged with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to 
form a multicampus institution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel 
Hill to The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greens- 
boro to The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the 
name of the campus at Raleigh was changed to North Carolina State Univer- 
sity at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Char- 
lotte in 1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington Col- 
lege became The University of North Carolina at Asheville and The Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 
1970 included the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public 
system of higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina and 
such other institutions of higher education as the General Assembly may 
deem wise. The General Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees 



of The University of North Carolina. . . ." In slightly different language, this 
provision had been in the Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, 
without changing their names, the remaining ten state-supported senior 
institutions into the University as follows: Appalachian State University, East 
Carolina University, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State Uni- 
versity, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, North 
Carolina Central University, North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke 
State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State 
University. This merger, which resulted in a statewide multicampus univer- 
sity of sixteen constituent institutions, became effective on July 1, 1972. 

The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees was designated the 
Board of Governors, and the number was reduced to thirty-two members 
elected by the General Assembly, with authority to choose their own chair- 
man and other officers. The Board is "responsible for the general determina- 
tion, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the 
constituent institutions." Each constituent institution, however, has its own 
board of trustees of thirteen members, eight of whom are appointed by the 
Board of Governors, four by the Governor, and one of whom, the elected 
president of the student body, serves ex officio. The principal powers of 
each institutional board are exercised under a delegation from the Board of 
Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed 
by a chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and 
appropriate allocation of function are effected by the Board of Governors 
and by the President with the assistance of other administrative officers of 
the University. The General Administration office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the Presi- 
dent as the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of 
North Carolina. 



vui 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



William A. Johnson, Chairman 

Mrs. Howard Holderness, Vice Chairman 

E. B. Turner, Secretary 

Class of 1979 

Julius L. Chambers Charlotte 

Dr. Hugh S. Daniel, Jr Waynesville 

William A. Dees, Jr Goldsboro 

Jacob H. Froelich, Jr High Point 

William A. Johnson Lillington 

Robert L. Jones Raleigh 

E. B. Turner Lumberton 

Mrs. George D. Wilson Fayetteville 

Class of 1981 

Hugh Cannon Raleigh 

Philip G. Carson Asheville 

T. Worth Coltrane Asheboro 

George W. Hill Durham 

Luther H. Hodges, Jr Charlotte 

Mrs. Hugh Morton Linville 

J. J. Sansom, Jr Raleigh 

David J. Whichard, II Greenville 

Class of 1983 

Irwin Belk Charlotte 

Wayne Corpening Winston-Salem 

Daniel C. Gunter Gastonia 

Mrs. Howard Holderness Greensboro 

John R. Jordan, Jr Raleigh 

J. Aaron Prevost Hazelwood 

Louis T. Randolph Washington 

Harley Shuford, Jr Hickory 

Class of 1985 

F. B. Bodenheimer Cary 

Laurence A. Cobb Charlotte 

Charles Z. Flack, Jr Forest City 

James E. Holmes Winston-Salem 

Mrs. John L. McCain Wilson 

Reginald F. McCoy Laurinburg 

William D. Mills Maysville 

Maceo A. Sloan Durham 



1977 



1978 



1979 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



JULY 



OCTOBER 



2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 





12 3 4 5 


6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 





MAY 



9 10 11 12 13 



AUGUST 



1 2 


3 4 


«S 


6 7 8 9 


10 11 


1? 


13 14 15 16 


17 18 


14 


20 21 22 23 


24 25 


?6 


27 28 29 30 


31 





JUNI 



12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 



5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


26 27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 



20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



SEPTEMBER 



1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 



JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


FEBRUARY II MARCH 

12 3 4 12 3 4 
56789 10 11 56789 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 2122 23 2425 19 20 2122 23 24 25 
26 27 28 26 27 28 29 30 31 


APRIL 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 1112 13 14 15 
16 17 18 1920 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


MAY JUNE 

12 3 4 5 6 12 3 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 1112 13 14 15 16 17 
2122232425 26 27 181920212223 24 
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 


su> JULY 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 2021 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


AUGUST 

12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 1920 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 79 30 


OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 2021 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

31 



JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


MARCH 

1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


APRIL 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


MAY 

12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


JUNE 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FBI SAT 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


JULY 

12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


AUGUST 

SUN MON TUE WED THU Fit SAT 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 



North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University was estab- 
lished as the A. and M. College for the Colored Race" by an act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of North Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in part: 
That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach prac- 
tical agriculture and the mechanic arts and such branches of learn- 
ing as relate thereto, not excluding academical and classical instruc- 
tion. 
The College began operation during the school year of 1890-91, before the 
passage of the state law creating it. This curious circumstance arose out of 
the fact that the Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1890 earmarked the pro- 
portionate funds to be allocated in bi-racial school systems to the two races. 
The A. and M. College for the White Race was established by the State Legis- 
lature in 1889 and was ready to receive its share of funds provided by the 
Morrill Act in the Fall of 1890. Before the college could receive these funds, 
however, it was necessary to make provisions for Colored students. Accord- 
ingly, the Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in Raleigh was em- 
powered to make temporary arrangements for these students. A plan was 
worked out with Shaw University in Raleigh where the College operated as 
an annex to Shaw University during the years 1890-1891, 1891-1892, and 
1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located in such city 
or town in the State as would make to the Board of Trustees a suitable pro- 
position that would serve as an inducement for said location. A group of 
interested citizens in the city of Greensboro donated fourteen acres of land 
for a site and $11,000 to aid in constructing buildings. This amount was sup- 
plemented by an appropriation of $2,500 from the General Assembly. The first 
building was completed in 1893 and the College opened in Greensboro during 
the fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural and 
Technical College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legislature. 

The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of new 
demands. The General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the 
Master of Science degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The 
first Master's degree was awarded in 1941. The School of Nursing was estab- 
lished by an Act of the State Legislature in 1953 and the first class was 
graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of 
the College in 1957, and redefined its purpose as follows: 

"The primary purpose of the College shall be to teach the Agricul- 
tural and Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning 
as related thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and adminis- 
trators for the public schools of the State, including the preparation of 
such teachers, supervisors and administrators for the Master's degree. 
Such other programs of a professional or occupational nature may 
be offered as shall be approved by the North Carolina Board of 
Higher Education, consistent with the appropriations made therefor." 



4 General Information 

The General Assembly of North Carolina voted to elevate the College to the 
status of a Regional University effective July 1, 1967. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act to consolidate 
the Institutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions 
of this Act, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University be- 
came a constituent institution of The University of North Carolina effective 
July 1, 1972. 

Six presidents have served the institution since it was founded in 1891. 
They are as follows: Dr. J. O. Crosby, (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley, 
(1896-1925), Dr. F. D. Bluford, (1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth T. Gibbs, (1956- 
1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor, (1960-1964), and Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy, 
who was elected President April 10, 1964. 



General Information 5 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE 

UNIVERSITY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Carson Bain Greensboro 

Marshall B. Bass Winston-Salem 

Lacy H. Caple Lexington 

Betty Cone Greensboro 

Wilbert Greenfield Charlotte 

C. C. Griffin Concord 

Robert Kraay Greensboro 

Richard D. Levy Greensboro 

John H. McArthur, Jr Wakulla 

David W. Morehead Greensboro 

Angeline Smith Greensboro 

Otis E. Tillman High Point 

Tony Graham Winston-Salem 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., MA., Ed.D. Litt.D Chancellor 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Matthew L. King, B.S., M.S Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for 

Student Affairs 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S.,Ph.D Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 

Theodore Mahaffey, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D Administrative Assistant 

to the Chancellor 

Howard Robinson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director of Research 

Administration 

W. Archie Blount, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Institutional Research 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Willie T. Ellis, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Suresh Chandra, B.Sc, M.Ch.E. Ph.D Dean, School 

of Engineering 

Quiester Craig, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Business 

and Economics 

Frank H. White, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

S. Joseph Shaw, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Albert W. Spruill, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean, The Graduate School 



6 General Information 

B. C. Webb, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Naomi W. Wynn, B.S., M.A Dean, School of Nursing 

J. Niel Armstrong, B.S., A.M Director of Summer School 

Tommie M. Young, B.A., M.A.L.S., Ph.D Director of Library Services 

Lt. Colonel Charles E. Summers, B.S., M.S Professor of Aerospace 

Studies 
Lt. Colonel John D. Jones, B.S., M.S Professor of Military Science 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for 

Student Affairs 

William C. Parker, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of Student 

Affairs for Service 

William Goode, B.S Dean of Student Affairs for Student 

Management and Human Relations 

Lucille Piggott, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Student Affairs for 

Student Organizations and Student Development 

Robert L. Wilson, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Director of Counseling Services 

Vance E. Gray, B.S., M.B.A Director of Student Financial Aid 

William H. Gamble, B.S Director of Admissions 

Rudolph Artis, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Registration and Records 

W. I. Morris, B.S., M.A Director of Placement 

Cleo McCoy, B.A., B.S., B.D Director of Religious Activities 

Sullivan Welborne, B.S., M.S Director of Memorial Union 

James Wright, B.S., M.S Acting Director of Student Activities 

FISCAL AFFAIRS 

Matthew L. King, B.S., M.A Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Fred L. Jackson, B.S Director of Accounting 

Lawrence Gulley, B.S Internal Auditor 

James E. Garfield, B.S., M.S Director of Auxiliary Services 

Doris D. Canada, B.S Director of Personnel 

Maxine D. Davis, B.S., M.Ed Director of Purchasing 

Ruby W. Jones, B.S Director of Contracts and Grants 

Gerard E. Gray, B.S., M.S Director of Physical Plant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S. Ph.D Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 

Shirley T. Frye, B.S., M.S Assistant to the Vice Chancellor 

for Development and University Relations 



General Information 7 

Joseph D. Williams, B.S., M.S Associate Director of Development and 

University Relations for Alumni Affairs 

Richard Moore, B.S., M.S Associate Director of Development and 

University Relations for Information Services 

Joseph Faust, AJ3 Director of Sports Information 

Harold L. Lanier, B.S., M.S Director of Cooperative Education 

OFFICER EMERITUS 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, A.B., Ed.M., LL.D President Emeritus 



LOCATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is located in the 
City of Greensboro, North Carolina. This urban location puts major shopping 
centers, churches, theaters, medical facilities and transportation within con- 
venient distance for the students. This location offers an advantage to many 
students who desire part-time employment while attending the University. 

The City of Greensboro offers a variety of cultural activities and recrea- 
tional facilities. It has become known for its colleges and universities, art 
galleries, libraries and museum,. 

The Memorial Auditorium attracts outstanding athletic events, concerts, and 
other popular events. The City offers facilities for bowling, boating, fishing, 
horseback riding, tennis and golf. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The university campus comprises modern, fire resistant buildings, all thor- 
oughly maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on land hold- 
ings in excess of 181 acres. 

UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Dudley Memorial Building (Administration) 

F. D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N. C. Agricultural Extension Service) 

Memorial Union 

The Oaks (President's Residence) 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Building 



CLASS ROOM AND LABORATORY BUILDINGS 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall School of Engineering 

Crosby Hall School of Arts and Sciences 

Hodgin Hall School of Education 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 



8 General Information 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education and Technology 

Benbow Hall Home Economics 

Garret House Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Technology 

Ward Hall Dairy Manufacturing 

Reid Greenhouses 

Graham Hall School of Engineering and Computer Science Center 

Frazier Hall Music-Art 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education & Technology 

Price Hall Annex Child Development Laboratory 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

Barnes Hall Biology 

Merrick Hall School of Business and Economics 

RESIDENCE HALLS 
Curtis Hall (148) 
Gibbs Hall (200) 

High Rise Dormitory (East) (194) 
High Rise Dormitory (West) (208) 
Holland Hall (144) 
Morrison Hall (94) 
Vanstory Hall (200) 
Cooper Hall (400) 
Scott Hall (1010) 
Senior Hall (200) 

Service Buildings 

Murphy Hall Student Services 

Brown Hall Cafeteria, Post Office, Student Financial Aid Office 

Sebastian Infirmary 

T. E. Neal Heating Plant 

Laundry-Dry Cleaning Plant 

Williams Hall Cafeteria 

Clyde Dehuguley Physical Plant Building 

Other Facilities 

University Farms — including 600 acres of land and modern farm buildings 
Athletic field — including three practice fields for football, quarter mile track, 
baseball diamond and field house. 



General Information 9 

ACCREDITATION AND INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University is a fully ac- 
credited member of the SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 
SCHOOLS. 

The School of Engineering is accredited by the Engineer's Council on Pro- 
fessional Development 

The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing, 
Department of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 

The Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education 

The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical 
Society 

The Department of Sociology and Social Service is accredited by the Council 
on Social Work Education 

The university holds institutional membership in the following associations: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing 

American College Public Relations Association 

American Council on Education 

American Public Welfare Association 

^American Library Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 

College Language Association 

National Association of Business Teacher Education 

American Personnel and Guidance Association 

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators 

Association of College Unions International 

National Association of College and University Food Service 

National Commission on Accrediting 

National Institutional Teacher Placement Association 

National League for Nursing, Council of Member Agencies, Department 
of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 

North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 

North Carolina League for Nursing 

... North Carolina Library Association 

Southeastern Library Association 



10 General Information 

Southern Regional Education Board Council on Collegiate Education for 

Nursing 

Graduates of the University are eligible for membership in the American 

Association of University Women 



DEGREES PROGRAMS 

Students who complete one or more of the courses of study listed below will 
be awarded the degree indicated. 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

Accounting — B.S. 

Administrative Services — B.S. 

Agricultural Business — B.S. 

Agricultural Education — B.S. 

Agricultural Economics — B.S. 

Agricultural Engineering — B.S. 

Agricultural Science — B.S. 

Agricultural Technology — B.S. 

Art. Design— B.S. 

Art Education— B.S. 

Art, Painting— B.S. 

Architectural Engineering — B.S. 

Biology — B.S. 

Biology, Secondary — B.S. 

Business Administration — B.S. 

Business Education, Secondary — B.S. 

Chemistry — B.S. 

Chemistry, Secondary Education — B.S. 

Child Development — B.S. 

Clothing and Textiles — B.S. 

Driver and Safety Education — B.S. 

Early Childhood Education (K-3)— B.S. 

Economics — B.S. 

Electrical Engineering — B.S. 

Engineering Mathematics — B.S. 

Engineering Physics — B.S. 

English— B.A. 

English, Secondary Education — B.S. 

Food Administration — B.S. 

Food and Nutrition (Including Dietetics) BS 

Food Science — B.S. 

French— B.A. 

French, Secondary Education — B.S. 

Health and Physical Education — B.S. 

History— B.S. 

History, Secondary Education — B.S. 

Home Economics Education — B.S. 

Industrial Arts Education — B.S. 

Industrial Engineering — B.S. 



General Information 11 



Industrial Technology — B.S. 

Junior High School Education — B.S. 

Landscape Architecture — B.S. 

Mathematics — B.S. 

Mathematics, Secondary Education — B.S. *w £ 

Mechanical Engineering — B.S. 

Music — B.A. 

Music Education — B.S. 

Nursing — B.S. 

Physics— B.S. 

Physics, Secondary — B.S. 

Political Science — B.A. 

Professional Theatre — B.A. 

Psychology — B.A. 

Reading Education — B.S. 

Recreation Administration — B.S. 

Social Science, Education — B.S. 

Sociology — B.A. 

Social Services — B.S. 

Speech— B.S. 

Speech and Theatre Education — B.A. 

Transportation — B.S. 

Vocational— Industrial Education— B.S. 

♦GRADUATE DEGREES 

Adult Education— M.S. 

Afro-American Literature — M.A. 

Agricultural Education — M.S. 

Art Education, Secondary — M.S. 

Audiovisual Media— M.S. 

Biology— M.S. 

Biology, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Chemistry— M.S. 

Chemistry, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Driver and Safety Education — M.S. 

Education— M.S. 

Educational Administration — M.S. 

Educational Supervision — M.S. 

Elementary Education, Early Childhood— M.S. 

Elementary Education, General — M.S. 

Engineering — M.S. 

English, Secondary Education— M.S. 

Food and Nutrition— M.S. 

French, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Guidance, Secondary Education— M.S. 

Health and Physical Education— M.S. 

History, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Industrial Arts Education — M.S. 

Intermediate Education (4-7) — M.S. 



*See Graduate School Bulletin for complete information 



12 General Information 

Mathematics, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Music, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Physical Education— M.S. 

Reading Education — M.S. 

Science Education — M.S. 

Social Science, Secondary Education — M.S. 

Student Personnel (Counseling Education; Guidance) — M.S. 

Trade and Industrial Education — M.S. 

Vocational — Industrial Education — M.S. 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY is dedicated to equality of 
opportunity within its community. Accordingly, NORTH CAROLINA A&T 
STATE UNIVERSITY does not practice or condone discrimination, in any form, 
against students, employees, or applicants on the ground of race, color, national 
origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNI- 
VERSITY commits itself to positive action to secure equal opportunity regard- 
less of those characteristics. 

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY supports the protections 
available to members of its community under all applicable Federal laws, in- 
cluding Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Edu- 
cation Amendments of 1972, Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Ser- 
vice Act, the Equal Pay and Age Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. 



ADMISSION POLICY AND PROCEDURE 

Admission Policy 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is an equal 
educational opportunity institution. In keeping with this policy, quali- 
fied applicants are admitted to the University without regard to race, 
sex, religion, creed or national origin. 

Unless otherwise specified, admission to all curricula are under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Director of Admissions. Application forms may be secured from 
that office. The completed forms with required evidence of eligibility should 
be submitted to the Director of Admissions as soon as possible, but at least 
four weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the applicant de- 
sires to enroll. 

Inquiries concerning admission should be addressed to the DIRECTOR 
OF ADMISSIONS, NORTH CAROLINA A. AND T. STATE UNIVERSITY, 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 27411. 



General Information 13 

Admission - Freshmen 

To be admitted to the University as a regular student an applicant must meet 
the following entrance requirements: 

Be graduated or scheduled to graduate from an accredited high school. 
(In exceptional cases admission by special examination is possible.) 
Complete sixteen (16) acceptable units of secondary school credit. Present 
a satisfactory score on the scholastic aptitude test. 



Admission - Transfer 

A student who wishes to transfer from another accredited college or univer- 
sity must meet the following requirements: 

Must have a cumulative average of "C" or above. Must be in good standing 
and eligible to return to the college or university last attended. Transfer 
students who have attended an accredited college but have earned less 
than thirty (30) semester hours of acceptable credit or equivalent must 
meet all freshman entrance requirements. These students must have a 
cumulative average of "C" and they must be eligible to return to the in- 
stitution last attended. 



Admission - Graduate School 

The student who has graduated from an accredited college or university will 
be considered for admission to the Graduate School. Graduate School admis- 
sion is under the supervision of the Dean of the Graduate School. All inquiries 
about graduate work should be directed to The Dean of the graduate school, 
NG A. and T. State University, Greensboro, N. C. 



Unit Requirements 

High School graduates should present sixteen (16) units of secondary school 
credit distributed as follows: 

Subject Number of Units 

English 4 

*Mathematics (preferably one unit of Algebra). . 2 

Social Science (Preferably U. S. History) 1 

Natural Science 1 

Electives 8 

Total 16 

*Students who plan to pursue majors in the School of Business and Economics 
and Science must have two units of Algebra, one-half unit of Trigonometry 
and one-half unit of Plane Geometry. 

*Students who plan te major in Engineering, Mathematics and Physics 
must have two units of Algebra, one unit of Plane Geometry and one-half unit 
of Trigonometry, 

The elective units may be selected from any other high school courses. How- 
ever, students may not present more than two (2) units in activity courses, 
such as Music and Physical Education, and not more than four (4) units in 
vocational courses. 



14 General Information 

Conditional Admission 

Students who present sixteen (16) acceptable entrance units but do not meet 
the entrance requirements in mathematics listed for their curricular must take 
special noncredit courses to remove these deficiencies. The removal of de- 
ficiencies must begin immediately upon enrollment in the first year of study. 



ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

Procedure for New Students 

1. Write to the Director of Admissions for an application blank for admis- 
sion to the University. Fill it out properly and return it to the Office of 
Admissions. 

2. Arrange for the transcript of academic records from high school and/ or 
college or university previously attended to be sent directly to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. 

3. All candidates for admission to the freshman class must take the Schol- 
astic Aptitude Test prior to admission. This test is administered by the 
College Entrance Examination Board several times each year at centers 
throughout the United States and many foreign countries. Testing dates 
are regularly scheduled in November, December, January, March, May, 
and July. Applicants should obtain Bulletins of Information, including 
application blanks, directly from their high school principals or guidance 
counselors. If these are not available in the school, applicants should 
write directly to the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey, for a list of testing dates and centers so that 
assignments may be made to the center nearest to the applicant's resi- 
dence. 

4. After the completed application form, transcripts, and test results are 
received, they will be evaluated, and if approved, the student will receive 
a letter of admission and a permit to register. If the applicant for admis- 
sion is not approved, the applicant will be notified. 

5. Each candidate for the Freshman Class, who is scheduled to reside on 
campus, is expected to arrive on the campus the day preceding the date 
designated on the college calendar for freshman orientation. All freshmen 
should be present by 8:00 a.m. on the first day. The permit to register 
furnished beforehand by the Director of Admissions indicating the School 
or Department in which the applicant wishes to register must be ready 
for presentation to proper authorities. The dates indicated in the college 
calendar for freshman orientation and registration as well as those for 
upperclassmen must be strictly observed. Those seeking registration 
after the scheduled date must pay a late registration fee of $15.00. 

Procedure for Transfer Students 

Applications from transfer students cannot be considered until all credentials 
are received from the high school and all other institutions previously at- 
tended. In addition, there must be a statement of good standing and honorable 
dismissal from these institutions. 

Previous college records must show a cumulative average of "C" or above. 
Even with a cumulative average of "C" or above, no course is accepted in 
which a grade below "C" was originally earned. 



General Information 15 

Accepted courses are recorded to the student's credit, but grade points are 
not calculated on the transferred courses. The grade points for a transfer stu- 
dent are calculated only on the courses taken here. 

A minimum of 50 percent of the credit hours completed must be earned at 
A and T State University in order to be considered for honors. 

Procedure for Special Students 

In exceptional cases, an applicant of mature years, with special training along 
particular lines or of long experience in special fields of knowledge, may be 
admitted to the college to pursue a non-degree program or to study certain 
subjects as special students. Even though they do not satisfy regular entrance 
requirements, such persons must submit evidence of ability to profit from such 
a program and must do a passing grade of work or forfeit the privilege 
accorded them. These persons must: 

1. Request of The Director of Admissions an application form, fill it in and 
return it with: 

(A) Records of previous educational experiences. 

(B) Other documentary evidence of ability to pursue the courses desired. 

(C) A statement of the applicant's objectives or purposes in pursuing 
studies chosen. 

Visiting Student 

A student regularly enrolled in another accredited college or university, may 
enroll at A. and T. State University for one or more courses during a regular 
term. Such special enrollment must be approved by the parent institution and 
A. and T. State University. 

Filing of Credentials 

Applicants should take the proper steps to see that their credentials, (trans- 
cripts, etc), are sent to the Director of Admissions as early as possible, pre- 
ferably not less than thirty (30) days before the beginning of the semester in 
which they plan to enroll. 

Re-Admission of Former Students 

All students who withdraw from the University must obtain a permit to register 
before resuming their studies at the University. The request for a permit 
must be received by the Office of Registration and Records at least 30 days 
prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to register. 
When requesting a permit, students should include their student number, 
major, last term in attendance and their permanent address. 

Former students who have been dismissed from the University for failure 
to meet the scholastic eligibility requirements may appeal to the Committee 
on Admissions and Retention for a review of their case. The appeal should be 
addressed to the Committee in care of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Af- 
fairs. 

These persons should not present themselves for re-enrollment until they 
have received a reply from the Committee. Appeals should reach the Com- 
mittee at least sixty (60) days prior to the beginning of the term in which the 
person expects to register. 



16 General Information 

Former students whose attendance has been interrupted by the university 
for disciplinary reasons must apply to the Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs for a review of their case for possible re-admission. 

ADMISSION 

Residence Status for Tuition Payment 

To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must have maintained his or 
her domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to 
his or her classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible 
for such classification, the individual must establish that his or her presence 
in the State during such twelve month period was for purposes of maintaining 
a bona fide domicile rather than for purposes of mere temporary residence 
incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education; further, (1) if the 
parents (or court-appointed legal guardian) of the individual seeking resident 
classification are (is) bona fide domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be 
prima facia evidence of domiciliary status of the individual applicant and (2) 
if such parents or guardian are not bona fide domiciliaries of this State, this 
fact shall be prima facia evidence of nondomiciliary status of the individual. 

University regulations concerning the classification of students by resi- 
dence, for purposes of applicable tuition differentials, are set forth in detail 
in A Manual To Assist The Public Higher Education Institutions of North 
Carolina in the Matter of Student Residence Classification for Tuition 
Purposes. Each enrolled student is responsible for knowing the contents of 
that Manual, which is the controlling administrative statement of policy on 
this subject. Copies of the Manual are available on request from the Office 
of Admissions, the Vice Chancellor for Students Affairs, and the Student 
Government Association. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



STUDENT LOAN FUND 

N. C. A. and T. State University Student Aid Fund was established by the 
Student Council of 1946-1947 to provide a source of revenue for loans to de- 
serving students. This fund is supported by the contributions from students, 
faculty members, and campus organizations. Any regular term student, duly 
registered, is eligible to apply for aid through this fund. 



THE NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

A. and T. State University participates in the National Defense Student 
Loan Program. This program was authorized by Public Law 85-864, the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act of 1958. It provides a loan fund from which 
undergraduates and graduate students may borrow on reasonable terms for 
the purpose of completing their higher education. A student must be a citizen 
of the United States, enrolled as a full-time or half-time undergraduate or 
graduate student in order to be eligible for a loan. Application forms and 
additional information may be obtained from the Financial Aid Officer, North 
Carolina A. & T. State University, Greensboro, North Carolina. 



General Information IV 

NORTH CAROLINA REHABILITATION CORPORATION 
STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Loans under this program are available to needy and worthy North Caro- 
lina farm boys and girls who plan to study agriculture or home economics. 
The loans bear interest at the rate of four percent per annum. Application 
forms and additional information may be obtained from North Carolina Rural 
Rehabilitation Corporation, Post Office Box 2403, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



REOUIRED FEES, DEPOSITS, AND CHARGES 

All registration fees and charges are due and payable in full before or at the 
beginning of registration for each semester. Payments made by mail must be 
postmarked not later than August 7th for the Fall Semester, and December 
14th for the Spring Semester. 

ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE BY CERTIFIED CHECK, BANK DRAFT, 
MONEY ORDER, OR CASH. Personal Checks will not be accepted. Checks 
drafts, and money orders must be made payable to North Carolina A & T 
State University, and sent directly to: 

Cashier's Office 

North Carolina A & T State University 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 

PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH PAYMENTS BY MAIL! 



ADVANCE DEPOSITS 

An advance deposit of $15.00 is required of all students and is to be paid in the 
following manner: 

1. All new Students shall pay prior to the end of the Second Semester of the 
current academic year. 

2. All returing Students shall pay within three weeks of the date of the Permit 
to Register. 

The deposit will be applied as follows: 

1. Against tuition and fees upon registration should the student matriculate at 
the University. 

2. Returned to the depositor should the student decide not to matriculate at the 
University and notification is received: 

(a) prior to the beginning of the term, if a new or returning student 

(b) within thirty (30) days following the close of the Second Semester of the 
current academic year, if a continuing student. 

3. Forfeited should the student decide not to matriculate at the University, and 
notification is not received as stipulated in #2 above. 

A $10.00 NON-REFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE IS REQUIRED OF ALL 

NEW STUDENTS. 



18 



General Information 



Charge Category 

DAY STUDENT 

(Student Living off Campus) 

BOARDING ONLY STUDENT 
(Student Living off Campus 
but taking meals on campus) 

BOARDING AND LODGING 

STUDENT 
(Student Living on Campus — 
Note: All dormitory students 
must take meals in the 
University Dining Hall) 



Residence Status 
Date Due In-State Out-Of-State 

Each Semester $283.50 $1,100.00 

Each Semester 523.50 1,340.00 



Each Semester $798.00 $1,614.50 



No. of Hrs. 



REGULAR SESSION CHARGES FOR 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

NORTH CAROLINA STUDENTS RATES 

Tuition and Other Required Book 
Academic Fees Fees Rental 



OUT-OF-STATE STUDENT RATES 



Total 



1-5 


35.25 


25.60 


5.00 


65.85 


6-8 


70.50 


71.20 


10.00 


151.70 


9-11 


105.75 


122.50 


20.00 


248.25 


12 or more 


141.00 


122.50 


20.00 


283.50 



No. of Hrs. 


Academic Fees 


Fees 


Rental 


Total 


1-5 


239.38 


25.60 


5.00 


269.98 


6-8 


478.75 


71.20 


10.00 


559.95 


9-11 


718.13 


122.50 


20.00 


860.63 


12 or more 


957.50 


122.50 


20.00 


1,100.00 



(Boarding and Lodging Per Semester — $514.50) 



SUMMER SCHOOL CHARGES PER SEMESTER HOUR 





N.C. Student 


Out-of-State Student 


Tuition and Academic Fees 


$ 15.00 


$35.30 


Other Required Fees 


1.70 


1.70 


Book Rental 


1.50 


1.50 


Total Per Semester Hour 


$18.20 


$38.50 



Boarding and Lodging — Per Week 
Linen Services — Per Week 
Total 



$26.75 

2.00 

$28.75 



Per Semester 


Per Year 


$ 141.00 


$ 282.00 


122.50 


245.00 


20.00 


40.00 


283.50 


567.00 



957.50 


$1,915.00 


122.50 


245.00 


20.00 


40.00 



General Information 19 

DETAILS OF FEES. DEPOSITS, AND CHARGES 



Required Fees - N.C. Student 

Tuition and Academic Fee 

Other Required Fees 

Book Rental 

Total— N.C. Day Student 

Boarding and Lodging: 

Room and Board 480.00 960.00 

Reserves for Construction and/or 

Renovation of Dormitories 17.50 35.00 

Linen Rental 17.00 34.00 

Total Boarding and Lodging 514.50 1,029.00 

Total N.C. Boarding and Lodging Student $ 798.00 $1,596.00 

Required Fees — Out-of-State Student: 

Tuition and Academic Fee 

Other Required Fees 

Book Rental 

Total Out-of-State Student 1,100.00 2,200.00 

Boarding and Lodging 514.50 1,029.00 

Total Out-of-State Boarding 

and Lodging Student $1,614.50 $3,229.00 

Incidental Fees, Deposits, and Charges: 

Activity-Meal-Health Stickers and ID Card Replacement Charge $21.00 

Application Fee (non-refundable-no credit on account) 10.00 

Advance Tuition Deposit (credit applied to account) 15.00 

Ambulance Service 25.00 

Bowling Course Fee 8.50 

Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Deposit (Refundable) 5.00 

Graduation Diploma 10.00 

Graduation Regalia Rental 9.50 

Infirmary Meal Charge-Per Meal-Day Student 1.00 

Linen Replacement Charge 10.00 

Practice Teaching, Practicum, Internship, each 35.00 

EOTC Uniform Deposit 10.00 

Special Examination Fees — $5 to $15 (average) 10.00 

Room Deposit (credit applied to account) 50.00 



AUDIT OF COURSES 

Course auditing is available to any student upon payment of all applicable 
fees. Full-time students may audit courses without additional charges. Students 
auditing courses are not required to participate in class discussion, prepare 
assignments, or take examinations. COURSE AUDITING IS WITHOUT 
CREDIT. 



20 



General Information 



REFUNDS 

1. A STUDENT MOVING OFF CAMPUS WILL BE CHARGED MINIMUM 
BOARDING AND LODGING FOR THIRTY (30) DAYS. Charges for with- 
drawals made beyond thirty days will be computed on a prorata basis from 
the date of official withdrawal. 

2. Tuition and required fees according to the following schedule: 

90 percent when withdrawal is within one week after registration date. 
80 percent when withdrawal is within two weeks after registration date. 
75 percent when withdrawal is within three weeks after registration date. 
60 percent when withdrawal is within four weeks after registration date. 
45 percent when withdrawal is within five weeks after registration date. 
35 percent when withdrawal is within six weeks after registration date. 
20 percent when withdrawal is within seven weeks after registration date. 
15 percent when withdrawal is within eight weeks after registration date. 
None when withdrawal is after eight weeks. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

In order to receive financial credit for withdrawal from courses, a student 
must withdraw from the course(s) within the official "add" period. 

SPECIAL NOTICES AND EXPLANATIONS 

THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO INCREASE OR DE- 
CREASE ALL FEES AND CHARGES AS WELL AS ADD OR DELETE ITEMS 
OF EXPENSE WITHOUT ADVANCE NOTICE AS CIRCUMSTANCES, IN 
THE JUDGMENT OF THE ADMINISTRATION, MAY REQUIRE. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Boarding and Lodging fees are based on the actual number of days school is 
in session and do not include holidays, breaks, or any other University Vaca- 
tions. 

Students' property in dormitories and other University buildings is at the sole 
risk of the owner, and the University is not responsible for loss, theft, or 
damage to such property arising from any cause. 

Students are required to pay for any loss of damage to University property 
at replacement cost due to abuse, negligence, or malicious action, in addition 
to being subject to disciplinary action. 

The costs of required "hardback" textbooks are included in the required fees. 
The cost of reference books, workbooks, supplies, and "soft-back" books are 
not included in the required fees. Policy and procedures governing the Book 
Rental System can be obtained from the University Bookstore. 

Personal spending money should be sent directly and made payable to the 
student in the form of money orders or certified checks. As a policy, the Uni- 
versity does not cash personal checks for students in any amount. 

Diplomas and transcripts of records are withheld until the student has paid 
in full and fees and charges due the University. Furthermore, a student in debt 
to the University in any amount will not be admitted to final examinations in 
any course, nor will a student be permitted to register for any subsequent se- 
mester until his or her obligations are paid. If special financial arrangements 
have been made, failure to comply with these arrangements as stipulated will 
result in the student being withdrawn from the University for non-payment of 
required fees. 



General Information 21 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO VETERANS 

Veterans attending school under the provisions of Public Law 89-358 receive 
a monthly subsistence allowance from the Veterans Administration. Therefore, 
Veterans are responsible for meeting all of their required fee obligations. 

Veterans attending school under the provision of Public Law 894 (Disabled 
Veterans) receive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Veterans Adminis- 
tration and also, the Veterans Administration pays directly to the school the 
cost of the Veteran's tuition and required fees. All other fees are the respon- 
sibility of the Veteran. 

Veterans may contact the Veterans Affairs Office on Campus for any special 
consideration which may be available. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 

Each student is responsible for informing himself or herself of the academic 
regulations and requirements set forth in this Bulletin and for revisions of 
same as posted on campus bulletin boards or released in other official publi- 
cations of the University. Failure to meet the requirements or comply with 
regulations because of lack of knowledge thereof does not excuse the student 
from meeting the academic regulations and requirements. 

A student's program of study must be approved by his or her adviser his or 
her chairman or a member of the faculty in his or her major department at 
registration. Advisers will make every attempt to give effective guidance to 
students in academic matters and to refer students to those qualified to help 
them in other matters. However, the final responsibility for meeting all 
academic requirements for a selected program rests with the student. 



Courses of Study 

Students should refer to the requirements of their respective departments 
and schools about their programs of study and confer with their adviser 
whenever problems arise. The student is expected to follow the program out- 
lined as close as possible. This is very important during the first two years 
when he or she is satisfying basic degree requirements and prerequisites for 
advanced work. 



Preregistration 

Preregistration is a time designated each semester to allow the student and 
his or her adviser to review the student's records and plan a program for the 
next semester. 

The student has an opportunity to discuss academic problems with the 
adviser. Preregistration helps to insure that the courses requested on the pre- 
registered schedule will be available to the students the following semester. 

Students who are enrolled in the University during the preregistration period 
are expected to preregister during the period designated for this purpose. 



22 General Information 

Official Registration 

In order for a student to get credit for a course, he or she must be properly 
registered in that course. This means that the student must have gone through 
the registration procedures as outlined by the University. Further, the student 
must have filed with the office of Registration and Records the required class 
schedule cards and other basic data cards and paid all required tuition and 
fees. 



Late Registration 

Students are expected to complete enrollment (including the payment of 
all required fees) on the dates listed on the University Calendar. The payment 
of fees is part of the registration process. No student is eligible to attend 
classes until the required fees have been paid. 

Students who fail to complete registration during the scheduled dates will 
be required to pay a late registration fee of $15.00 



Auditing a Course 

Regular students may audit a course upon the written approval of the in- 
structor and his or her faculty adviser. They must register officially for the 
course and pay an audit fee to the University Cashier. 

Attendance, preparation, and participation in the classroom discussion and 
laboratory exercises shall be at the discretion of the instructor. 

Auditors are not required to take examinations and tests and they receive no 
credit. An auditor may not change his or her registration from audit to credit 
or from credit to audit after the date for adding courses shown in the Univer- 
sity Calendar. 

Course Load 

The normal course load is fifteen or sixteen (15 or 16) credit hours. A full- 
time undergraduate student is required to carry a minimum of twelve (12) 
credit hours. The maximum course load for an undergraduate student is 
twenty-one (21) hours. This includes physical education and non-credit 
courses. 



Double Major 

Students who desire to obtain a double major, involving two departments or 
two schools must satisfy the major requirements for each department or 
school. 



Repetition of Courses 

A student who has received a failing grade in a required course at this uni- 
versity must repeat and pass the course unless the Dean of the School author- 



General Information 23 

izes a substitute course. In cases where a student earns a "D" in his major 
field and is required to repeat the course the "D" is treated in the same man- 
ner as an "F" is treated. That is, the "D" is dropped in the computation of 
the GPA for the purpose of meeting graduation requirements in his major 
field. 

A course which is a prerequisite to another in a sequence must be passed 
before the student can take the next course in the series. When a course is 
repeated and passed only the higher grade will count towards meeting the 
course and degree requirements. 

A student who is taking a course as an elective or out of his or her major 
field is not held to the prerequisite provision. However, permission of the in- 
structor of the course or the student's department chairman is required. 

A student who has received a passing grade in any course at this university 
may repeat the course for credit at his or her option. Again, when this is done 
only the higher grade will count towards meeting course and degree require- 
ments. Dual course credit is not allowed. This is to say that only three (3) 
hours of credit are allowed for a three (3) hour course regardless of the num- 
ber of times it is repeated. 

All grades earned by the student including "F's" are a part of his or her 
official academic record and will appear on his or her transcript. 



Course Credit by Examination 

A student may receive course credit for a given course by successfully com- 
pleting an examination administered by his or her department on that subject. 
The student receives the grade "P" and regular credit for the number of hours 
involved. However, the credit hours are excluded in computing the student's 
grade point average. 



(Grading System) 

Grades are assigned and recorded as follows: 

Grade 

A 

B 

C 

D 

F 

I 

P 

S 

u 
w 



Description 


Grade Points 


Excellent 


4 


Good 


3 


Average 


2 


Below average, but passing 


1 


Failure 





Incomplete 




Satisfactory (credit by examination) 




Satisfactory (non-credit courses) 




Unsatisfactory (non-credit courses) 




Withdrew 





GRADE POINT 


SEMESTER 


AVERAGE 


HOURS 


1.10 


12 


1.20 


24 


1.30 


36 


1.40 


48 


1.55 


60 


1.70 


72 


1.80 


84 


1.90 


96 



24 General Information 

ACADEMIC RETENTION 

The normal load for an undergraduate student is sixteen credit hours per se- 
mester. The minimum load for a full-time undergraduate student is 12 credit 
hours per semester. The student is expected to make normal progress toward a 
degree. 

To continue at the University, a full-time student must have the following 
minimum grade point average and the following minimum semester hours 
passed at the end of the semester indicated: 

SEMESTER 
NUMBER 

ONE 

TWO 

THREE 

FOUR 

FIVE 

SIX 

SEVEN 

EIGHT 

A student who does not meet the above requirements will be placed on aca- 
demic probation and required to remove the deficiency prior to the beginning 
of the next fall semester, or by the end of the student's third regular semester 
in residence whichever comes first. Failure to remove this deficiency during 
the probation semester makes the student ineligible to re-enroll the following 
semester. The student will be suspended for one semester. Students who are 
on probation at the end of the spring semester may attend summer school and 
work toward removing their academic deficiencies. The student who has been 
suspended and re-admitted is required to make a minimum grade point aver- 
age of 2.0 the first semester or session of re-enrollment. 

A part-time undergraduate student enrolled in a degree program must main- 
tain the following minimum cumulative grade point average at the end of the 
cumulative semester hours indicated: 

SEMESTER GRADE POINT 
HOURS AVERAGE 

24 1.2 

48 1.4 

72 1.7 

96 1.9 

A part-time student is defined as one who takes less than 12 hours. The part- 
time student who fails to maintain the minimum average is subject to the penalty 
prescribed for full-time students. 

Grade Points 

Grade points are computed by multiplying the number of semester hour 
credits by 4 for courses in which a grade of A is earned; by 3 for a grade of 
B; by 2 for a grade of C; by 1 for a grade of D. No grade points are given for a 
grade of F. 



General Information 25 

Grade Point Ratio 

The grade point ratio is obtained by dividing the total number of grade 
points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted. 

Course Numbers and Classification 

Each course bears a distinguishing number which identifies it within the 
department and indicates, broadly, its level. The numbering system is as fol- 
lows: 

100 - 399, lower level courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores 

400 - 599, upper level courses primarily for juniors and seniors 

600 - 699, courses for undergraduate and graduate students 

700 - 899, courses for graduate students and appropriate professional stu- 
dents special programs 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified on the basis of semester hours completed, excluding re- 
medial and deficiency courses. The following classification scale applies to all 
students enrolled in a four (4) year program: 

CLASSIFICATION SEMESTER HOURS COMPLETED 

Freshman 0-32 

Sophomore 33-63 

Junior 64-95 

Senior 96 or above 

The following classification scale applies to students enrolled in a five year 
program: 

CLASSIFICATION SEMESTER HOURS COMPLETED 

Freshman 0-33 

Sophomore 34-67 

Lower Junior 68-100 

Upper Junior 101-133 

Senior 134 or above 



CHANGE OF GRADE 

A request for a change of grade, for any reason, must be made within one year 
following the date the original grade was assigned by the faculty member. 



Changes in Schedules 

A change in a student's program may be made with the consent of his or 
her instructor and department chairman. However, if a student's schedule is 
changed after the designated period for adding and/ or dropping courses, the 
consent of the School Dean is required. 

The student must obtain and properly execute the Change of Schedule 
Form and the necessary schedule cards. These materials are obtained from 
the Office of Registration and Records and should be returned to that office. 



26 General Information 

Changing Schools 

Students may transfer from one School of the University to another with the 
written approval and acceptance of the Deans of the Schools involved. The 
proper forms on which to apply for such a change are to be obtained from 
the Office of the Registrar and executed at least six weeks prior to the begin- 
ning of the semester in which the student plans to transfer. When such a 
transfer is made the student must satisfy the current academic requirements 
of the school and/ or department to which the student transfers. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student who wishes, or is asked to leave the University at any time during 
the semester shall execute and file official withdrawal forms. These forms may 
be obtained from the Counseling and Testing Center. They should be com- 
pleted and executed in quadruplicate (quintuplicate for veterans), and taken 
to the Cashier's Office. For failure to execute these forms, a student incurs 
the penalty of receiving an "F" for each course in which he or she is enrolled 
that semester. 

Students who withdraw from the University within 15 calendar days of the 
beginning of the final examination period for the semester shall receive 
grades based upon their performance in classes up to the date of their with- 
drawal. 

INCOMPLETES 

Students are expected to complete all requirements of a particular course 
during the semester in which they are registered. However, if at the end of the 
semester, a small portion of the work remains unfinished and should be de- 
ferred because of some serious circumstances beyond the control of the stu- 
dent, an "I" may be submitted. 

An. "I" for a prolonged illness may be submitted only after the written 
approval of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs has been secured. An 
"I" for other causes may be submitted only with the approval of the Dean of 
the School. 

Along with the recording of the incomplete grade, the instructor must also 
file with the head of the department, the student's average grade and a writ- 
ten description of the work which must be completed before the incomplete 

is removed. 



(Procedure for the Removal of an Incomplete) 

An incomplete grade must be removed within SIX WEEKS after the begin- 
ning of the next semester. If the student has not removed the incomplete 
within the time specified, the "I" becomes an "F". 



Semester Examinations 

A final examination will be required as a part of every course. An examina- 
tion schedule showing time and place of meeting of each course and section 
will be published each semester. Schedules so published will be followed with- 
out exception. Any changes in the examination schedule must be approved by 
the Office of Academic Affairs. 



General Information 27 



Honor Roll 



To encourage scholarship, the University publishes an Honor Roll at the end 
of each semester. Regular undergraduate students whose grade point average 
is 3.00 or higher shall be eligible for the Honor Roll. 



CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Regular and punctual class attendance is the responsibility of the individual 
student. Moreover, the student is expected to have sufficient maturity to 
assume the responsibility for regular attendance and to accept the consequences 
of failure to attend. 

The non-compulsory class attendance policy places responsibility on the 
student and the instructor. 

Student's Responsibility 

1. The student is responsible for all material covered in each course for 
which he or she is registered. Absence from class does not relieve him or 
her of this responsibility. 

2. The student is expected to be present for laboratory periods, scheduled 
examinations, and other activities that may require special preparation. 

3. The student is responsible for initiating any request to make up an ex- 
amination, a laboratory exercise or other work missed because of a 
class absence. If the instructor requests a statement concerning the rea- 
son for the absence, the student should obtain it from the appropriate 
officer (eg. the University Physician, the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs. 

4. The student is expected to report to each class at the beginning of the 
term with a validated schedule and a class admission card. 

Instructor's Responsibility 

1. The instructor is responsible for explaining to the class any specific ex- 
pectations concerning attendance at the beginning of the term. 

2. The instructor is responsible for providing the student with a schedule 
of the examinations and other class requirements that will provide a 
basis for evaluating student performance. 

3. The instructor is responsible for maintaining a record of the attendance 
of the students in his or her class. 

4. The instructor is expected to warn the student when his or her academic 
progress is adversely affected by excessive absence from class. 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for a degree from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University must satisfy the following minimum requirements: 

1. Choose a specific curriculum leading to a degree in one of the schools 
and complete the requirements of this curriculum. 



28 General Information 

2. Complete a minimum of 124 semester hours excluding deficiency courses 
and remedial work for the Bachelor's degree. 

3. Complete the core requirements of the University in English, Mathe- 
matics, Natural Science, Social Science, Humanities and Health or Physi- 
cal Education for the Bachelor's degree. 

4. Earn an average of two (2) grade points for every semester hour under- 
taken including hours passed or failed. After completing the number of 
credit hours required for graduation, if the student is deficient in grade 
points, he or she must take additional courses that have been approved 
by his or her academic dean to secure these points. The student must 
also obtain an average of 2.0 or more in his or her major field. 

5. Complete a minimum of three semesters as a full-time student in residence 
at the University. This requirement includes the two semesters prior to 
the period when the student completes his or her requirements for 
graduation. At least one-half of the credits in the student's major field 
must be earned at the University. Exception to either of these provisions 
may be made upon the recommendation of the Chairperson of the stu- 
dent's major department and with the approval of the School Dean. 

6. Take the Graduate Record Examination and/or the National Teachers 
Examination if applicable to his or her program. 

7. Clear all academic conditions by the end of the semester preceding 
graduation. 

8. Pay all University bills and fees. 

9. File an application for graduation with the Office of Registrar three 
months prior to the expected date of graduation. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Graduation honors are awarded candidates who complete all requirements 
for graduation in accordance with the following stipulations: (1) Those who 
maintain a general average within the range of 3.00 to 3.24 will receive CUM 
LAUDE, (2) those who mainatain a general average within the range from 3.25 
to 3.49 will receive MAGNA CUM LAUDE, and (3) those who maintain a gen- 
eral average within the range of 3.50 to 4.00 will receive SUMMA CUM 
LAUDE. A minimum of 50 percent of the credit hours completed must be 
earned at A and T State Unviersity in order to be considered for honors. Pub- 
lication of honors and scholarships is made at graduation and in the Univer- 
sity Catalogue. 

GRADUATION UNDER A GIVEN CATALOGUE 

A student may expect to earn a degree in accordance with the requirements 
of the curriculum outlined in the catalogue in force when he or she first 
entered the University provided the courses are being offered. Moreover, he 
or she must complete these requirements within six years. On the other hand, 
he or she may graduate under any subsequent catalogue published while he 
or she is a student. If a student elects to meet the requirements of a catalogue 
other than the one in force at the time of his or her original entrance he or she 
must meet all requirements of the catalogue he or she elects. 

Obtaining Transcripts 

A transcript is furnished at the written request of the student. The stu- 
dent must remit one dollar per transcript in the form of a postal money order 
or certified check. 



General Information 29 

FERDINAND D. BLUFORD LIBRARY 

The Ferdinand D. Bluford Library is housed in a modern airconditioned 
building located near the center of the main campus. The current holdings 
include 325,982 volumes and a collection of records, films, filmstrips and 
prints. The Library subscribes to 1,279 periodicals, newspapers and indexes. It 
is an officially designated depository for selected United States government 
publications and participates in established inter library loan programs. 

Special facilities and services provided by the Library include an assembly 
room, individual study carrels, various types of microfilm and microfilm 
readers and a film collection. 

The Library schedule is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 M 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. - 12:00 M 

The Teacher Education Materials Center and The Clinton Taylor Art Gallery 
are located on he ground floor of the F. D. Bluford Library. The Ethnic Studies 
Resource Center is located on the first floor of the library. 

A reference collection for the department of Chemistry is located in Hines 
Hall. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE AUDIOVISUAL CENTER 

The Audiovisual Center is a resource pool of materials, services and 
facilities. It purports to assist in the improvement of instruction by providing 
means of facilitating the communication of ideas, attitudes and facts in the 
teaching-learning process. The Center is located on the first floor (Room 101) 
of Crosby Communications Building. The Audiovisual Center provides the 
following services for the campus: 

-Information on Instructional Materials and Equipment from other Sources 

-Projectionist for Audiovisual Showings 

-Classroom and Preview Showings 

-Assistance in the selection and preparation of Instructional Materials 

-Consultation on problems relating to the location, selection, utilization, 
design and evaluation of instructional materials and equipment 



CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION 

An important adjunct to the educational program of the University is the 
newly activated television facility. This closed-circuit installation is housed in 
the Crosby Communications Building. Programs may be originated in the 
studio, in six classrooms and in the Little Theater. Programs may be received 
from the studio or from "off the air" in 23 classrooms or seminars rooms. 
Assistance in designing and producing instructional programs is provided to 
members of the faculty, and students are instructed in television production 
in the studio. 



30 General Information 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

The Computer Science Center is located in the Graham Building, the engi- 
neering annex. The Center provides instruction, research and administrative 
service for the university. 

The Center is composed of two primary units which operate independently 
but in unison to solve the data processing problems of the University. One 
operating unit handles administrative data processing and the other handles 
or maintains the software system and handles academic data processing. 

The staff helps with the preparation of computer programs, provides instruc- 
tion concerning the use of equipment, serves as consultants to computer users 
conducting research and performs certain administrative functions. 

The computer system in use at the Center is a Control Data Corporation 
(CDC) 3300 System and supporting pieces of IBM unit record equipment. 



LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

An electronic, dial-access laboratory has been provided for students en- 
rolled in Foreign Language, Speech, and Reading Courses. This facility pro- 
vides positions from which students may dial prepared lessons, exercises or 
lectures. In addition, certain positions provide the opportunity to control 
remote tape recorders on which to record their own responses. Certain rooms 
are equipped with over-head speakers accessing both tape drives and record 
players. Although primarily designed for the departments mentioned, the fa- 
cility is available to other departments of the University. 



READING CENTER 

The University Reading Center is located in Crosby Hall. It was established 
to provide assistance for students who need to improve their reading skill. 
English 102, Developmental Reading, is offered through the center to help 
students improve their reading efficiency and strengthen their communicative 
skills. Diagnostic and remedial services are available to students also. In 
addition to these services the center serves as a laboratory for teacher 
preparation. 



INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH IN HUMAN RESOURCES 

The University has organized an Institute for Research in Human Re- 
sources. Its broad purpose is to investigate problems that exist for people who 
are culturally, economically, educationally or socially disadvantaged. The In- 
stitute has been structured to bring together available resources and attri- 
butes from the University and the larger community for research service and 
study. The interdisciplinary approach employed by the Institute allows social 
scientists, humanists and the natural scientists to place special emphasis 
upon achieving new approaches and new solutions to many human resource 
problems. 



General Information 31 

THE CENTER FOR MANPOWER RESEARCH AND TRAINING 

Originally funded by a grant from the U. S. Department of Labor, Man- 
power Administration, the Center for Manpower Research and Training offers 
to students and faculty an opportunity for interdisciplinary training and re- 
search in the areas of manpower planning to solve problems of unemployment, 
underemployment and discrimination. The participating departments include 
business administration, economics, industrial education, industrial tech- 
nology, psychology, guidance, and sociology and social service. 



TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE 

The Transportation Institute draws faculty, staff members and students 
from a number of different departments to create an interdisciplinary unit 
that conducts training and research programs in the field of transportation. 
It also serves as a resource for planners, social scientists, public officials, 
and community groups in helping them solve transportation problems. 

In the Training Program, students choose from a coordinated series of 
courses offered by the Departments of Architectural Engineering, Business 
Education, Economics and Political Science. Students are encouraged to seek 
a broad background which can be tailored to meet their individual needs. 

The Research Program covers a wide range of areas, from investigating 
transportation needs of the poor to developing a transportation systems 
model. The programs are oriented towards both exploring various problem 
areas and providing students the opportunity to become knowledgeable in 
transportation analysis. 

Activities of the Transportation Institute are not limited to students. The 
Institute is a regional center which offers seminars, workshops, and short 
courses designed to provide instruction in current techniques and transporta- 
tion concepts. These programs are designed for individuals outside the Uni- 
versity who have an interest in transportation. 



OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

The Office of Development and University Relations is maintained by the 
University not only to assist with the overall institutional development, but 
also to promote its continual interest among alumni, parents, friends, founda- 
tions, corporations and other sectors of the national community. It encourages 
annual alumni giving, deferred giving and conducts special fund campaigns. 
The Office embraces the following areas of operation: Alumni Affairs, Public 
Information, Fund Raising, Publications, Public Relations, Legislative Rela- 
tions, Industrial Liaison, Sports Publicity and special educational projects. 

In addition, the Office aids in conducting the affairs of the A & T University 
Foundation, Inc., which has been established to assist in soliciting gifts from 
other than state coffers for such worthy purposes as unrestricted student 
scholarships, specialized scholarships for students in science, engineering 
and fine arts, faculty improvement, faculty chairs, research programs, an 
endowment fund, the art gallery, historical museum and capital funds. 

The Office is conveniently located on the main floor of the Dudley Me- 
morial Building. 



32 General Information 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Cooperative Education is a carefully organized and supervised program of 
"Experiential Learning" in which the participating student enriches his or 
her education by alternating periods of classroom study with periods of work 
related to his or her academic major. It is OPTIONAL on the part of the stu- 
dent and is COUNSELING-CENTERED. The objective of the program is to 
enrich the Total Educational Experience of students involved. 

GREENSBORO REGIONAL CONSORTIUM 

The Greensboro Regional Consortium is an organization comprised of North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro, High Point College, Greensboro College, Bennett Col- 
lege and Guilford College. The organization promotes interinstitutional 
cooperation and cooperative educational activities among the six institutions. 
Agreements provide the opportunity for any student to enroll at another in- 
stitution for a course or courses not offered on one's home campus. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES 

Provision is made for counseling, testing, and guiding all students through 
the Counseling and Testing Office. It is located on the ground floor of Dudley 
Building. 

The Counseling Services Office conducts a testing program for all fresh- 
men. The results of this program are used to assist freshmen in the planning of 
their educational and vocational careers. The Office conducts other testing 
programs that are required or desired by departments of the University, also. 
In addition to these duties, the Office of Counseling services cooperates with 
the Director of Placement in the placement of graduates. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

The Health Service Center maintains a staff of doctors and nurses who are 
qualified to give professional attention to the health problems of students. 
The basic components of the health service program are as follows: 

1. Medical Services: 

The University maintains a Director of the Health Services. University 
Physicians are in attendance in the infirmary daily — morning and evening 
— and "on call" for any emergency situations. 

2. Nursing Services: 

Registered nurses, under the direction of a head nurse, are in attendance 
daily on a twenty-four hour basis 

3. Follow-up and Consultation Services: 

Follow-up services are given, and referrals to specialists are made upon 
recommendation of the University Physician. 

4. Physical Examinations: 

a. Athletes, nursing students, advanced ROTC cadets and other special 
groups of students are given complete physical examinations at the 
Student Health Center each semester or whenever necessary. 

b. All freshmen and transfer students are required to secure a complete 
physical examination, a blood test and a chest X-ray and send the 



General Information 33 

examination reports to the Director of Health Services before they 
are admitted to the college. The blood test and chest X-ray reports 
must be secured within 60 days prior to the date of enrollment. Fol- 
low-up examinations are made at the Health Center when neces- 
sary. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The University provides food service for students at a reasonable cost. A 
snack bar is located in the Memorial Student Union Building. Students who live 
in the residence halls are required to eat in the cafeterias. Students who live in 
the city may purchase meals also. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The Placement Center is a centralized operation and is responsible for 
placement activity for all schools, divisions, and departments of the Univer- 
sity. It provides services to all seniors and graduate students as well as other 
students seeking employment. The Center offers a continuing service to 
graduating students and alumni. 

Placement services to seniors and graduate students include individual and 
group conferences, career counseling, arranging interviews between inter- 
ested students and company representatives on campus. It also provides in- 
formation to students concerning summer employment and part-time 
employment. There is no charge to students, alumni, or employers for this 
service. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS AND SERVICES 

An information center and clearinghouse services are provided for veterans 
and war orphans who are admitted and who plan to receive money from the 
Veterans Administration. 

The following are listed for their information and guidance: 

1. Report to the Veterans Office as soon as you arrive. 

2. Bring any communication you have from the Veterans Administration. 

3. Veterans who are enrolling for the first time should bring their separa- 
tion papers with them. 

4. Be prepared to pay all bills and expenses for the first three (3) months. 

5. The Veterans Administration requires fourteen hours for full-time student 
benefits. 

6. The Veterans Administration pays no money to the University for veterans 
training. All money is paid directly to the veteran; therefore each veteran 
is responsible for meeting all of his or her financial obligations. 

THE MEMORIAL UNION 

The Memorial Union, dedicated and opened during the Spring Semester, 
1966-67, is the "Community Center", serving diverse needs. It embraces a 
great variety of facilities and it performs a multiplicity of functions. It is a 
lounge, reading room, student organizations and activities headquarters, work- 
shop, art gallery, theatre, music room, forum, games room, dance and party 



34 General Information 

center, office building, outing and recreation center, cultural center, ticket 
bureau, bookstore, confidence headquarters, dining room and snack bar, in- 
formation center, barber shop, public relations agency, refuge for meditation, 
guest room and meeting room. The physical proximity it provides promotes the 
sense of community among students, faculty, alumni and publics of the Uni- 
versity. The Union facilitates a positive recreational and cultural mission. 



HOUSING 

The residence halls provide opportunities for personal, social, and intellectual 
companionship as well as experiences in group living. Each residence hall is 
organized and it conducts programs for the development of the student. 

Housing facilities for women are provided in Cooper, Gibbs, Holland, Mor- 
rison, Vanstory and High Rise. Men are housed in Curtis, Scott and Senior 
Hall. 



STUDENT LIFE 



STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The board objective of the program of Student Personnel Services is to aid 
the student in developing the attitudes, understandings, insights and the skills 
which will enable him or her to express himself or herself as a socially com- 
petent person. The program places special emphasis on campus relationships 
and experiences which complement formal instruction. 

More specifically the program of Student Personnel Services is conceived 
as a continuing exercise of identifying and remedying the daily life problems 
of the student. Accordingly, very definite efforts are made: 

1. To help the student to become better acquainted with himself or herself 
and the various problems confronting him or her. 

2. To help the student to develop the ability to make satisfactory choices 
and adjustments. 

3. To aid the student in making desirable adjustments in group relationships. 

4. To provide cultural and social experiences which will help the student to 
develop an appreciation for the best in his or her culture. 

5. To promote the physical, mental, moral and spiritual development of the 
student. 

A number of college officials, faculty, and staff members are responsible 
for various phases of the program of Student Personnel Services. These in- 
clude the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Personnel Deans, the Director 
of Counseling and Testing Services, Food Services, Religious Activities, 
Housing, Health Services, the Director of Placement Services, University 
Union, the Advisor to Foreign Students, faculty advisors, and other individuals 
and agencies. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

The University provides a well-balanced program of activities for moral, 
spiritual, cultural and, physical development of the students. Religious, cul- 



General Information 35 

tural, social and recreational activities are sponsored by various committees, 
departments, and organizations of the university. Outstanding artists, lec- 
turers and dramatic productions are brought to the campus also. 

A listing of student organizations, their purposes, objectives, etc., is pro- 
vided in the Student Handbook. 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

Students enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity are expected to conduct themselves properly at all times. They are 
expected to observe standards of behavior and integrity that will reflect favor- 
ably upon themselves, their families and the university. They are expected to 
abide by the laws of the city, state, and nation, and by all rules and regulations 
of the University. 

Accordingly any student who demonstrates an unwillingness to adjust to 
the rules and regulations that are prescribed or that may be prescribed to 
govern the student body will be suspended or expelled from the institution. 
Furthermore, any student whose conduct or behavior is not in harmony with 
the ideals or purposes of the university will be suspended or expelled. 

A student may forfeit the privilege of working for the University when, for 
any reason, he or she is placed on probation because of misconduct. 



Archives 

F, D. Bluford Library 

N, C. A & T State University 

Greensboro, N, C. 27411 



36 General Information 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1977-78 



FALL SEMESTER, 1977 



August 18— Thursday 
August 19— Friday 
August 21 — Sunday 
August 22-23; Monday and 

Tuesday 
August 24 — Wednesday 
August 25-27; Thursday-Saturday 
August 29— Monday 
September 5 — Monday 
September 6 — Tuesday 
September 8 — Thursday 
October 17-22; Monday-Saturday 
October 21— Friday 

November 4 — Friday 

November 8-11; Tuesday-Friday 
November 23 — Wednesday 
November 28 — Monday 
December 10 — Saturday 
December 12 — Monday 
December 17 — Saturday 
December 17 — Saturday 



Administrator's Conference 

Faculty-Staff Conference 

Freshmen and Transfer Students Report 

Orientation and Advisement of Freshmen 
and Transfer Students 

Upperclassmen report 

Registration 

Classes Begin 

Holiday (Labor Day) 

Classes Resume at 7:00 a.m. 

Last Day to Add a Course 

Mid-Semester Evaluation 

Last Day to Apply for Fall Semester Grad- 
uation 

Last Day to Drop a Course Without Grade 
Evaluation 

Pre-Registration for Spring Semester 

Thanksgiving Holidays Begin at 1:00 p.m. 

Classes Resume at 7:00 a.m. 

Reading Day 

Final Examinations Begin 

Final Examinations End 

Fall Semester Ends, Christmas Holidays 
Begin 



General Information 



37 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1977-78 
SPRING SEMESTER, 1978 



January 3 — Tuesday 
January 3 — Tuesday 
January 4 — Wednesday 

January 4 — Wednesday 
January 5-7; Thursday-Saturday 
January 9 — Monday 
January 9 — Monday 
January 20 — Friday 
February 28— March 3 

(Tuesday- Friday) 
March 4 — Saturday 
March 13— Monday 

March 17— Friday 

March 27— Monday 

April 11-14; Tuesday-Friday 

April 12 — Wednesday 

April 26-29; Wednesday-Saturday 

May 7 — Sunday 
May 6 — Saturday 
May 8— Monday 
May 13— Saturday 



Faculty and Staff Report 

Freshmen and Transfer Students Report 

Orientation and Advisement of Freshmen 

and Transfer Students 
Upperclassmen Report 
Registration 
Classes Begin 
Late Registration Begins 
Last Day to Apply for Graduation 
Mid-Semester Evaluation 

Spring Holidays Begin 

Spring Holidays End, Classes Resume at 
7:00 a.m. 

Last Day to Drop a Course Without Grade 
Evaluation 

Easter Holiday 

Pre-Registration for Fall Semester 

Awards Day Convocation 

Final Examinations for Graduating Stu- 
dents 

Commencement 

Reading Day 

Final Examinations Begin 

Final Examinations End, Spring Semester 
Ends 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 




SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Burleigh C. Webb, Dean 

Philosophy and Objectives. The School of Agriculture embraces the funda- 
mental philosophy of the Land-Grant Institution and it accepts the obligation 
to provide a program of resident instruction, research and non-formal instruc- 
tion adequate to meet the needs of those who seek this service. It administers 
to the general needs of an interdependent rural-urban society and to the spe- 
cial needs of those who desire and benefit from instruction in agriculture, and 
home economics. 

The objectives of the School of Argiculture are two fold: (1) to extend the 
academic proficiency of its students through organized instruction and re- 
search and (2) to share its resources with its clientele through organized short 
courses, conferences, and related activities designed to meet special needs. 

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS 

Organized research is conducted in Agriculture and Home Economics by a 
research faculty with joint appointments in the instructional program. Much 
of the research activity is sponsored by the Cooperative State Research Service 
and the United States Department of Agriculture. It is conducted on the Uni- 
versity farm and in on-campus laboratories where investigations include such 
disciplines as Agricultural Economics, Animal Science, Plant Science, Land- 
scape Architecture and Design, Human Nutrition, and Textiles. 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Agricultural Extension is an educational service which provides information 
and assistance in a broad range of subjects to individuals, families, and 
organized groups in rural and urban areas of the state. The Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
is an integrated function of the state-wide program headquartered at North 
Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 

Departmental Organization. The School of Agriculture is organized into the 
following departments: (1) Agricultural Economics, (2) Agricultural Educa- 
tion, (3) Animal Science, (4) Home Economics, (5) Plant Science. 

Requirements for Admission. The requirements for admission to the School 
of Agriculture are the same as the general requirements for admission to the 
University. 

Requirements for Graduation. The requirements for graduation for the Bachelor 
of Science Degree are as follows: 

1 . The student must have satisfied the course requirements of an approved cur- 
riculum in an organized department administered by the School of Agri- 
culture. 

2. The student must have earned a cumulative average quality of at least a 
"C" in his or her major courses and in his or her overall academic program. 

Curricula. The curricula of the School of Agriculture are designed to provide 
the students who pursue courses of instruction leading to the Bachelor of 
Science Degree (1) a fundamental understanding of the basic disciplines which 
are applied to their respective majors; (2) liberal education experiences of- 



42 Department of Agricultural Economics 

fered by the University; and (3) knowledge and competency required for spe- 
cialization. 

The Master of Science Degree is offered in Agricultural Education and Food 
Nutrition. (For further details consult the Graduate School Bulletin.) 

A. Agriculture 

Programs in Agriculture at the bachelors level lead to a degree in Agricultural 
Technology with optional specialities in Agricultural Science, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, and Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

B. Home Economics 

The curricula leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Eco- 
nomics are offered in the area of (1) Clothing, Textiles and Fashion Merchandis- 
ing, (2) Food and Nutrition, (3) Home Economics Education, (4) Child Devel- 
opment, and (5) Food Science. 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion Merchandising. This major leads to profes- 
sional opportunities in clothing, textiles, fashion and business. 

Food and Nutrition. The major in food and nutrition provides two options: 
(1) Food and Nutrition and (2) Therapeutic Dietetics. 

Home Economics Education. The Home Economics Education major is de- 
signed to provide the necessary training and skills for teachers of home eco- 
nomics, for graduate study and for a variety of careers with service organiza- 
tions with concern for individual and family development. 

Child Development. The major in Child Development prepares students 
for positions as directors of nursery schools, hospital child care specialist, child 
care specialist in industry, state, local government and community sponsored 
agencies, day care specialist, media consultant for children's programs, pri- 
vate ownership in child care, and graduate study. 

C. Cooperative Program in Food Science 

The major in Food Science is conducted through a 3-1 plan where by the first 
three years of prescribed work are done at the A&T State University, and the 
fourth year is completed in cooperation with North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Sidney H. Evans, Chairman 

The School of Agriculture offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricul- 
tural Economics where the student may concentrate in Agri-Business and 
General Agricultural Economics. The major is taught by the faculty of the 
Economics Department in cooperation with the School of Business and 
Economics. 

The required courses for the Agricultural Economics major in either con- 
centration prepares the student for graduate training and careers in business, 
industry and government. 



Department of Agricultural Economics 43 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS MAJORS 

Course No. Credit Hours Course Title 

Econ. 300 3 Principles of Economics 

(Micro Econ.) 
Econ. 301 3 Principles of Economics 

(Macro Econ.) 
Ag. Econ. 330 3 Introduction to 

Agricultural Economics 
Ag. Econ. 332 3 Elements of Farm 

Management 
Ag. Econ. 334 3 Marketing Agricultural 

Products 
Ag. Econ. 336 3 Agricultural Prices 

Econ. 305 3 Elementary Statistics 

Econ. 310 3 Advanced Statistics 

Econ. 410 3 Intermediate Econ. Theory 

Econ. 420 3 National Income Analysis 

Econ. 525 
or Ag. Econ. 532 _3_ Economic Seminar or 

Agricultural Econ. Research 
33 

PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 or 113 4 4 

Air or Military Science or electives 3 . . . _1_ _1_ 

15 15 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 
Economics 300 (Formerly 302), 

Ag. Econ. 330 3 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

Ag. Engineering 113, Economics 301 ... 3 3 
Animal Husbandry 301 or Poultry 

Husbandry 317 3 — 

Plant Science 110 — 3 

Air or Military Science or electivesa ... 1 — 

Speech 250 =_ _2 

14 15 

a Any three semester hours elective 



44 Department of Agricultural Economics 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Ag. Econ. 334 3 — 

Economics 305 3 — 

Economics 310 — 3 

Accounting 221, 222 3 3 

Ag. Econ. 332 — 3 

Economics 410, 420 3 3 

Foreign Language _3_ _3_ 

18 18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Elective 3 — 

Agi. Ecom. 336 Elective 3 3 

Ag. Econ. 642, 532 or Econ. 525 — 3 

Business Administration 450, 451 3 3 

Electives _6_ _6_ 

15 15 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Undergraduate 

330. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

An application of the fundamental principles of economics to agricultural 
production, marketing, land tenure, leasing arrangements, financing and re- 
lated economic problems. Prerequisite: Econ. 300. 

332. Elements of Farm Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles which govern the effective organization and operation of the farm 
firm. Prerequisite: Econ. 300. 

334. Marketing Agricultural Products. Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and practices of marketing as applied to farm commodities. Form, 
place, time and possession utility, the ultimate consumer's market, the agri- 
cultural industries market, the middleman system, exchange market operation 
and future contacts, price determination, reducing marketing costs. Visits will 
be made to local markets. Prerequisite: Econ. 300. 

336. Agricultural Prices. Credit 3(3-0) 

Information regarding agricultural price changes, index numbers, price 
determination, seasonal and cyclical price movements, storage problems, and 



Department of Agricultural Economics 45 

other methods of controlling extreme price fluctuations, government price 
policy. Prerequisite: Econ. 300 and 305 or equivalent. 

440. Resource Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of Economic problems of resources use and management. Percep- 
tion of and definition of problems in terms of allocation mechanism. Analysis 
of Economic relationships over time and market externalities with emphasis on 
welfare implications. Prerequisite: Econ. 300. 

442. Cooperative Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 

Early cooperative movements, principles of cooperatives, importance of 
cooperatives in the United States, problems of organization, management 
and operation of cooperative endeavors by farmers in buying and selling. Pre- 
requisite: Ag. Econ. 330, 334 

530. Economics of Food Distribution. Credit 3(3-0) 

Description of market structures and operations in the processing, whole- 
sale and retail distribution of food. The effect of industrial organization and 
government regulations on the efficiency of the market and consumers de- 
mand for food. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 334. 

532. Agricultural Economics Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of different types of research methodology used in the field of Agri- 
cultural Economics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

630. Rural Development. Credit 3(3-0) 

Trends and the formulation of economic and social problems in the South 
and particularly in North Carolina; labor and capital mobility, agricultural as 
compared with the industrial, the problem of underemployment, and impor- 
tant phases of current economic development. Prerequisite: Econ. 301, Ag. 
Econ. 330. 

632. Agricultural Policy. Credit 3(3-0) 

The place of Agri-business in the National and International economy; the im- 
pact of public policy on the industry. An analysis of policy as it relates to 
price support programs, finance, trade and resource development. Prere- 
quisite: Ag. Econ. 330. 

638. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. Credit 3(2-2) 

Designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the field of 
agricultural economics; problems definition, formulation and investigation. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

640. Agri-Business Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

Methods of research, plans, organization, and the application of manage- 
ment principles. Part of the student's time will be spent in consultation with 
Agri-business firms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



46 Department of Agricultural Economics 

642. Seminar in Agricultural Economics. Credit 2(2-0) 

Discussion reports and an appraisal of current literature on agricultural 
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

644. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics I. Credit 3(2-2) 

Statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. The 
statistical table, ratios, percentages, bar charts, line charts, and frequency 
distribution are used as analytical tools. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 330, Econ. 
301 or Sociology 203. 

648. Appraisal and Finance of Agricultural and 

Related Firms. Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of land evaluation, appraisal and taxation. The role, classifica- 
tion, and principles underlying the economic use of credit. Prerequisite: Econ. 
301, Ag. Econ. 330. 

COURSES IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 
Undergraduate 

330. Principles of Rural Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Social systems, cultural patterns, and institutional arrangements of people in 
rural environments. 

An interpretation of the structure, functioning and change in rural social 
systems. 

501. Rural Social Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

A focus on the problems and solutions of population dynamics, education, 
religion, health, land tenure, parity income, farm labor, mechanization, hous- 
ing, poverty, and rural development as they affect the growth of the rural 
community. 

503. Rural Family. Credit 3(3-0) 

The institutional nature of the rural family, etc., role in the community in- 
cluding its relations to educational, religious, welfare and other community 
organizations. 

505. Rural Standards of Living. Credit 3(3-0) 

Consumption behavior in the main community groups of our rural society. 
The poverty threshold and the plight of the rural poor. 

506. Special Problems in Rural Sociology. Credit (2 to 4 hrs.) 

Work on problems in the rural society under the guidance of a faculty 
member. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Rural Leadership and Organization. 

Opportunities and needs for rural leadership; educational and psychological 
requirements for various types of rural leaders. 

Research contribution of social, psychological and cultural Anthropology 
in developing viable rural organization and leadership. 



Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 



47 



DEPARTMENTOF AGRICULTURAL 
AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

A. P. Bell, Chairman 

The Department of Agricultural and Extension Education prepares students 
for positions in educational fields in agriculture and related areas including 
schools and colleges, agricultural extension, business, trade and professional 
associations, and government agencies. The Department administers a pro- 
gram approved by the State Department of Public Instruction for the prep- 
aration of teachers of agriculture in the public school systems. The program 
includes courses in general education, professional education, and technical 
education. 

The program for Agricultural Education majors leads to the bachelor of 
science degree in Agricultural Education. The department also offers the master 
of science degree in Agricultural Education. (See the graduate bulletin for de- 
tails). 

PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION MAJORS 
Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140 4 — 

Zoology 160 — 4 

Animal Science 301 — 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Air or Military Science (Elective) (1) (1) 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 _J_ _1_ 

15 18 



Sophomore Year 



Course and Number 

Speech 250 

Psychology 320, 325 

Chemistry 101, 102 

Plant Science 110 

Agricultural Engineering 114 ... 

Dairy Science 311 or 

Poultry Science 317 

Humanities 200, 201 

Health Education 200 

Agricultural Economics 330 .... 

or Economics 301 

Air or Military Science (Elective) 



Fall Semester 
Credit 

3 
4 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
2 
3 
4 
3 



3 

18 



Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Agricultural Education 400, 402 2 

Agricultural Education 401 , 403 2 

*Technical Agricultural Electives 3 

Bacteriology 121 4 

Soil Science 338 — 

Education 400 3 

Free Electives _3_ 

17 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

2 

2 

6 



_3_ 

17 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Agricultural Economics 332 3 

Agricultural Education 501, 502 3 

Agricultural Education 503 — 

Agricultural Engineering 525 — 

Rural Sociology 330 3 

Technical Agricultural Electives 3 

Zoology 468 or Botany 530 3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

6 
3 
3 



12 



Agricultural Education Concentration 

The agricultural education major may follow a program with concentration 
in one of the following subject matter areas of technical agriculture. 

Agricultural Communication 

Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Animal Science 

Plant Science 

Soil Science 

Horticulture 

The program will be worked out on individual basis by the student and his 
adviser. The student will be co-advised by the Agricultural Education Staff and 
a staff member from the subject matter area in which the student does his con- 
centration. Students may do a concentration in the area of Environmental 
Science by taking selected courses relating to the Environment in the above 
subject matter areas and other areas which will prepare them for such teach- 
ing in the Agricultural Curriculum of the secondary schools. Suggested cur- 
riculums for these options are available in the Agricultural Education Depart- 
ment. 



*Twelve credits should be completed in one subject matter area (Technical 
Agriculture). 



Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 49 

COURSE OFFERINGS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

101. Agricultural Education. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly General Agriculture 1000) 

A study of the broad base of modern agriculture with emphasis on current 
trends and opportunities. 

102. Agricultural Education. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly General Agriculture 1001) 

A continuation of 101 with special emphasis on the development of agricul- 
ture as a modern technology and the impact of science on its development. 

400. Audio- Visual Aids in Occupational and Technical Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1240) Credit 2(1-2) 

Techniques in preparing, using, and evaluating audio-visual aids in occupa- 
tional and technical education. 

401. Youth Organizations and Leadership. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1241) Credit 2(2-0) 

Practices and procedures of Leadership development and the organization of 
youth groups in secondary schools, agricultural extension, and other com- 
munity programs. 

402. Secondary Education in Agriculture. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1242) 

Designed to acquaint students with the historical objectives of vocational 
education and agriculture, the problems in the area of secondary schools, and 
some solutions. 

403. Teaching Out-of-School Groups. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1243) Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods and materials used in teaching adults and young farmers. It will 
include developing and using various teaching devices and aids for out-of- 
school groups. 

501. Materials and Methods of Teaching Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1261) Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of teaching as applied to agriculture in secondary schools. Pre- 
paring and using lesson plans and organizing teaching aids to meet community 
needs. Prerequisites: Agricultural Education 400 and 402; Psychology 320. 

502. Student Teaching. Credit 6(6-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1262) 

Students will be required to spend twelve weeks in an approved teaching 
center doing observation and directed student teaching. Prerequisite: Agri- 
cultural Education 501. 

503. Evaluation and Problems in Teaching Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1263) Credit 3(3-0) 



50 Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 

The process of discovering and analysing problems in the field; program 
building, and evaluation of instruction. This will include an appraisal of all 
phases taught by the teacher of agriculture. Prerequisites: Agricultural Educa- 
tion 501 and 502. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

601. Adult Education in Occupational Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1271) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting pro- 
grams for adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organ- 
ized instruction in Agriculture and related industries. 

602. The Principles of Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1272) 

A study of the principles and practices in agricultural education revealed 
by research and new trends. 

603. Problem Teaching in Occupational Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1273) 

Practices in setting up problems for teaching unit courses in vocational 
education. 

604. Public Relations in Agriculture. Credit 3<3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1274) 

Principles and practices of organizing, developing, and implementing public 
relations for promoting local programs in vocational agriculture and agricul- 
tural extension. 

605. Guidance and Group Instruction in Occupational Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1275) Credit 3(3-0) 

Guidance and group instruction applied to agricultural occupations and 
other problems of students in vocational education. 

606. Cooperative Work-Study Programs. 

Principles, theories, organizations, and administration of cooperative work 
experience programs. 

607. Environmental Education. 

Principles and practices of understanding the environment and the inter- 
related complexities of the environment. The course will include a study of 
agricultural occupations related to the environment and materials that need 
to be developed for use by high school teachers of agriculture and other pro- 
fessional workers. 



Department of Agricultural and Extension Education 



51 



Graduate 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the Bulletin of the 
Graduate School for course descriptions. 



700. Seminar in Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1285) 

702. Methods and Techniques of Public Relations. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1286) 

703. Scientific Method in Research. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1287) 

704. Philosophy of Occupational Education 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1288) 



Credit 1(1-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 



705. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1289) Credit 3(3-0) 

706. Comparative Education in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

707. Issues in Community Development and Adult Education Credit 3(3-0) 

750. Community Problems 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1290) Credit 3(3-0) 

751. Methods and Techniques of Supervision in Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1291) Credit 3(3-0) 

752. Administration and Supervision. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1292) Credit 3(3-0) 

753. Program Planning. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1293 Credit 3(3-0) 

754. History of Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1294) Credit 3(3-0) 

760. Thesis Research in Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1299) Credit 3(3-0) 



DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Talmage Brewer, Acting Chairman 

1. The Department of Animal Science offers courses designed to meet the di- 
verse interests of students by offering a choice of several options of study in 
which the students may specialize. The Animal Science Department offers 
the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Technology Agricultural 
Science and Food Science. It also offers an option in pre-veterinary medi- 



52 Department of Animal Science 

cine. Students wishing a major in Agricultural Technology may concen- 
trate in either of the following fields of specialization: Animal Science, 
Dairy Science, Dairy Technology or Poultry Science. Students wishing a 
major in Agricultural Science may concentrate in Animal Science. 

2. A Pre-Veterinary Science Program, which is an option to the Agricultural 
Science and referred to as the 3-1 plan, is also offered by the Department. 
The 3-1 designation is given because under the plan, three years of work is 
completed toward the bachelor's degree in Agricultural Science at North 
Carolina A&T State University and upon successful completion of the first 
professional year at Veterinary School the student would be eligible for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree in Agricultural Science. 

3. The Food Science Program, as outlined, provides the opportunity for the 
student to complete all course requirements for the B.S. degree in Food 
Science as approved by the Institute of Food Technologists. The program 
in Food Science relates to the chemical, physical and microbiological changes 
which occur in foods during processing, handling and storage. Studies are 
also designed to develop competencies in sensory evaluation and product 
development. The first three years of prescribed courses are offered in co- 
operation with the Department of Home Economics. 



Program For 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Technology 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Air or Military Science (Elective) 1 1 

15-16 15-16 



Sophomore Year 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 104, 114; 105, 115 4 4 

Animal Science 301; 

Poultry Science 317 3 3 

Dairy Science 311; 

Plant Science 110 3 3 

Agricultural Economics 330 3 — 

Health Education 200 — 2 

Air or Military Science (optional) 1 1 

16-17 15-16 



Department of Animal Science 53 

Junior Year 

Economics 301; 

Agricultural Economics 332 3 3 

Bacteriology 121 4 — 

Agricultural Engineering 114; 

Soil Science 338 3 4 

*Electives (Major Area) 4 7 

Electives _3_ _£ 

17 18 



Senior Year 

Animal Science 404; 

Plant Science 307 3 3 

Animal Science; 445; Agricultural 

Engineering 303, 304 or 402 2 3 

Electives (Major Area) _9_ __8 

14 14 



Supporting Courses (Electives) 

Agricultural Economics 334, 336; Business 440, 458; Speech 250, 251; Chemistry 
251, 252; Agricultural Engineering 303, 522; Industrial Technology 410; Mathe- 
matics 240. 



Program For 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Science 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Air or Military Science (optional) _1_ _L 

16 16 



"The 28 credits as major electives are to be taken such that: 12 credits are selected from supporting 
courses; 16 credits are selected from one of the following areas of concentration: Animal Science, 
Dairy Science, Dairy Technology and Poultry 



54 Department of Animal Science 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 116; 107, 117 5 5 

Agricultural Engineering 114; 

Animal Science 301 3 3 

Plant Science 110; 

Poultry Science 317 3 3 

Health Education 200 2 — 

Air or Military Science (optional) 1 1 

16-17 14-15 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 225, 226 4 4 

Soil Science 338 — 4 

Chemistry 221, 223; Economics 301 .... 5 3 

*Electives (Major Area) 6 3 

Electives _3_ _3 

18 17 



Course and Number 

Mathematics 224 

Agricultural Economics 330 

Bacteriology 121 

*Electives (Major Area) 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 


Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 


3 




4 




9 


12 


16 


15 



Supporting Courses (Electives) 

Zoology 461, 465, 466; Agricultural Economics 332, 334, 336; Chemistry 222, 
224; 251, 252; Speech 250, 251. 



*The 30 credits required as major electives are to be taken such that: 12 credits are elected from sup- 
porting courses; 18 credits are elected from the area of concentration with approval of the advisor. 



Department of Animal Science 55 



Curriculum For 

PRE-VETERINARY ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Suggested Curriculum 

First Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 _J^ _J^ 

15 15 



Second Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 116; 107, 117 5 5 

Animal Science 301; 

Dairy Science 311 3 3 

*Restricted Electives 3 3 

Poultry 317 — 3 

Health Education 200 _2_ _^ 

16 17 



Third Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 225, 226 4 4 

Animal Science Electives 6 6 

Bacteriology 121 — 4 

Chemistry 221, 223 5 — 

Electives _3_ 3 

18 17 



*See major advisor. 



56 



Department of Animal Science 



Program For 
Bachelor of Science in Food Science 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Chemistry 101, 111; 102, 112 4 4 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 4 

Agricultural Educ. 101 or Home Econ. 101 1 — 

Health Education 200 J= ^ _2_ 

16 17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Electives (Mathematics) 3 3-4 

Chemistry 221 , 223 Elective (Chemistry) b 5 

Bacteriology 121 — 

Food Science 236, Food Science 337 ... . 3 

History 100, 101 , or Economics 301 or 330 3 

Physical Education 246, 247 1 

Social Science or Humanities (Elective) — 

15-16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3-5 
4 
3 
3 

1 
3 



17-19 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Speech 251 , Literature (Elective) 3 3 

Food Science 401, or 407, or 409 or 505, 631 3 3 

Physics 225 4 — 

Social Science or Humanities (Elective) 3 3 

Elective ^ 3S 

16 15-18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Food Science 331, 490 3 1 

Food Science 402, 490 3 3 

Food Science 405, 511 or 516 3 3 

Food Science 521, Food Science (Elective) 3 3 

Elective 3 5 

15 15 

(a) Students with interest in graduate school or science emphasis should elect Mathematics 221. 

(b) Students with interest in graduate school or science emphasis should elect Chemistry 222 & 224. 

(c) Students with interest in graduate school or science emphasis should elect Physics 226. 

(d) Senior year for B.S. in Food Science will be completed at North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. See the North Carolina State University Bulletin for course descriptions. 



Department of Animal Science 57 

COURSES IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 
Undergraduate 

301. Principles of Animal Science Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to the livestock-meat industry involving the fundamentals of 
modern livestock production, marketing and processing, including animal nutri- 
tion, reproduction, market classes and grades, meat processing and tech- 
nology. 

302. Judging and Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals Credit 3(1-4) 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection and evaluation of beef 
cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep and horses. Ability to present accurate, clear 
and concise reasons is stressed. (Prerequisite, Animal Science 301; Dairy 
Science 311) 

401. Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Introduction to meats from the standpoint of the consumer, processor and 
producer. Emphasis on meat as a food including inspection, grading, process- 
ing, preservation and identification. 

402. Animal Breeding Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the principles of genetics as applied to the improvement of ani- 
mals and some of the methods and problems of the breeder. (Prerequisite, 
Animal Science 301) 

404. Livestock Feeding Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of feeding and composition of feeds. (Prerequisite, Animal Science 
301) 

420. Livestock Production Credit 4(3-2) 

Breeds of beef cattle, swine and sheep — their selection, care and manage- 
ment. (Prerequisite, Animal Science 301, 404) 

441. Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals Credit 3(2-2) 

Designed to acquaint students with structure and functions of organs, tis- 
sues and systems of farm animals. (Prerequisite, Zoology 160) 

442. Physiology of Reproduction of Farm Animals Credit 3(2-2) 

Anatomy of the reproduction organs with detailed coverage of the physiology 
processes involved and of factors controlling and influencing them. (Prerequi- 
site Zoology 160) 

443. Sanitation and Diseases of Farm Animals Credit 2(2-0) 

Sanitation and the common diseases of livestock with references to causes, 
prevention and treatment and their relation to the environment. 



58 Department of Animal Science 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

601. Principles of Animal Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamentals of modern animal nutrition including classification of nu- 
trients, their general metabolism and role in productive functions. (Prerequisite 

A.S. 404). 

602. Animal Science Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

A review and discussion of current literature pertaining to all phases of 
Animal Science. 

603. Advanced Livestock Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Special problems dealing with feeding, breeding, and management in the 
production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

692. Selection of Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Identification, grading, fabrication and processing of meat and meat prod- 
ucts. 



COURSES IN DAIRY SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

311. Principles of Dairying Credit 3(2-2) 

The fundamental principles of dairying, types of dairy cattle; the composi- 
tion of milk, its chemical and physical properties, sampling and testing of milk; 
selection and herd management; quality control procedures. 

312. Dairy Technology Credit 2(1-2) 

A continuation of 311 — more detailed use of Babcock Test for other dairy 
products, as well as other laboratory tests. 

313. Dairy and Food Plant Sanitation Credit 2(1-2) 

Principles and procedures involved in sanitary standards and regulations for 
milk and food products; related areas of water, air, and environmental sanitation 
will also be included. 

314. Dairy Plant Practice Credit 2(0-4) 

Assigned practice work at the college dairy and the milk and ice cream labora- 
tories of the college dairy plant; given for both dairy manufacturing and dairy 
science majors. (Prerequisite — Three dairy courses.) 

405. Dairy Plant Management Credit 2(1-2) 

The organization and management of dairy plant; procurement of raw sup- 
plies; plant layout; equipment for plants, distribution of products, cost and 
operation, and record keeping. 



Department of Animal Science 59 

406. Dairy Products Judging Credit 2(0-4) 

Standards and grades of dairy products; practice in judging milk, cream, 
butter and ice cream. 

407. Market Milk Credit 2(1-2) 

The market milk industry, milk ordinances, city milk, supply, transportation, 
grading, pasteurizing, bottling and distribution. (Prerequisite — Dairy Science 
311.) 

408. Advanced Dairy Technology Credit 2(1-2) 

Theory of and practice in analytical methods used for control in the dairy 
manufacturing plant. (Prerequisite — Dairy Sci. 407.) 

409. Ice Cream Making Credit 3(1-4) 
The principles involved in the manufacturing of commercial ice cream. 

430. Dairy Cattle and Milk Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Breeds of dairy cattle; problems of economical milk production. 

444. Dairy Breeds and Pedigrees Credit 2(1-2) 

A study of dairy pedigrees and breed families; testing and association 
methods. 

445. Dairy Cattle Judging Credit 2(1-2) 

Characteristics of dairy breeds and score card requirements; relation of type, 
form and function to the value of selection. Practice judging. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

604. Dairy Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

Assignments of papers on subjects relating to the dairy industry and methods 
of preparing and presenting such papers. 

606. Special Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be inter- 
ested, given largely by project method for individuals either in Dairy Manu- 
facturing or Dairy Science. (Prerequisite — three advanced courses in dairying.) 



COURSES IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 
317. Poultry Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Practices and principles of poultry production. 

330. Fundamentals of Poultry Breeding Credit 4(3-2) 

Breeding and selection and improvement of stock. (Prerequisite — Poultry 
Sci. 317.) 



60 Department of Animal Science 

501. Diseases and Parasites of Poultry Credit 3(2-2) 

Poultry hygiene; causes of diseases; symptoms and control of diseases and 
parasites. (Prerequisite — Poultry Sci. 317.) 

503. Incubation and Hatchery Management Credit 4(2-4) 

Management of poultry farm and hatchery operation. (Prerequisite — Poultry 
Sci. 317.) 

505. Processing and Marketing of Poultry Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Methods of killing, dressing, grading and storage of poultry meats and the 
grading and storage of eggs; transportation of poultry products and factors 
influencing price. (Prerequisite — Poultry Sci. 317.) 

608. Poultry Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

Special articles and reports on subjects relating to the poultry industry will 
be assigned each student with round table discussion. 

609. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology Credit 3(2-2) 

A course which deals with the structure and function of tissues, organs, and 
systems of the domestic fowl. (Prerequisite — Poultry Sci. 501.) 

690. Special Problems in Poultry Credit 3(3-0) 

Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be interested, 
given largely by project method for individuals in Poultry Science. (Prerequisite 
— Three advanced courses in Poultry Sci.) 

Graduate Courses in Animal Science 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for course descriptions. 

702. Advanced Livestock Marketing Credit 3(3-0) 

703. Advanced Livestock Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Graduate Course in Dairy Science 
705. Advanced Dairy Farm Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Graduate Course in Poultry Science 
780. Poultry Research Credit 3(0-6) 



COURSES IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

236. Introduction to Food Science Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Food & Nutrition 236) 

An introductory study of the nature of raw foods and behavior of food com- 
ponents during handling and processing. The key methods and principles of 
food preservation and processing will also be discussed. (Prerequisites: Chemis- 
try 105, 115 or 222, 224) 



Department of Animal Science 61 

337. Introduction to Human Nutrition. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Food & Nutrition 337) 

An introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to 
human requirements for food nutrients; significance and mechanism through 
which nutrients meet these biological needs during the life cycle. (Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 105, 115 or 222, 224 and Biology 461. 

401. Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Animal Science 401) 

Introduction to meats from the standpoint of the consumer, processor and 
producer. Emphasis on meat as a food, including inspection grading, proces- 
sing, preservation and identification. 

407. Market Milk Credit 2(1-2) 

(Also Dairy Science 407) 

The market milk industry, milk ordinances, city milk, supply transportation, 
grading, pasteurizing, bottling and distribution. (Prerequisite Dairy Science 
311) 

409. Ice Cream Making Credit 3(1-4) 

(Also Dairy Science 409) 

The principles involved in the manufacturing of commercial ice cream. 

505. Processing and Marketing of Poultry Products Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Poultry Science 505) 

Methods of killing, dressing, grading and storage of poultry meats and the 
grading and storage of eggs; transportation of poultry products and factors 
influencing price. (Prerequisite Poultry Science 317) 

Advances Undergraduate and Graduate 

621. Advanced Food Science Credit 3(2-2) 

(also Food & Nutrition 631) 

A study of the chemical and physical properties of components of raw foods 
and behavior of the food components during processing and storage. (Pre- 
requisite Food Science 236 or equivalent) 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Harold E. Mazyck, Chairman 

The curricular requirements of the Department of Home Economics have 
been selected to provide a background for the development fo competencies 
and values which will: 

1. Make possible satisfying personal, group and family relationships as a 
basis for active participation in a democratic society; 

2. Lead to the enrichment of home and family living through the apprecia- 
tion and use of art and advances in science and technology; 

3. Develop understanding and appreciation of varying cultural backgrounds; 
and 

4. Prepare the individual for gainful employment in one of the major areas 
of the profession. 



62 Department of Home Economics 

Home Economics courses are not restricted to majors in the Department. All 
introductory courses may be taken by any student. Admittance to other 
courses may be secured upon receiving approval of the instructor. 

MAJOR AREAS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The department offers the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in the 
following areas: (1) Clothing, Textiles and Fashion Merchandising — CTFM; (2) 
Food and Nutrition — FN; (3) Child Development — CD; and (4) Home Economics 
Education — HEc. The Food and Nutrition major offers options in (1) Food and 
Nutrition and (2) Therapeutic Dietetics. Information concerning the gradua- 
tion requirements for each of the four areas is given in the following pages. A 
minimum of 124 semester hours are required to earn a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Home Economics. 

The selection of electives must be approved by the Student's adviser. 

The Department of Home Economics offers a graduate program leading to 
the Master of Science degree in Food and Nutrition. This program leads to op- 
portunities as nutrition specialists; food specialists in journalism, radio and 
television; public health nutritionists; college teachers; and research technicians 
in food and nutrition. 

PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND 
FASHION MERCHANDISING 

This major leads to professional opportunities in clothing, textiles, fashion 
and business. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Physical Ed. 101, 102 1 1 

Home Economics 101 1 

Food & Nutrition 133 3 — 

French 100 3 — 

Home Economics 122, 123 jh_ _JL 

17 15 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

**Natural Science 4 4 

Sociology 100 3 — 

Anthropology 200 or 300 3 — 

Home Economics 401 — 3 

Art 225 or 224 — 2 

Speech 250 — 2 

Home Economics 321, 124 _J_ _3_ 

17 17 

"Chemistry 104, 114, 105, 115 or Biolofrical Science 100 and Physical Science 100, 110 



Department of Home Economics 63 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Art 226, 227 3 3 

Business Adm. 220, 360 3 3 

*Accounting 221 3 — 

Economics 302 — 3 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Home Economics 423, 426, 425 4 6 

Electives 2-3 2-3 

16-18 15-18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

*Business Ad. 430, 433 3 3 

Home Economics 521, 523* 4 4 

Home Economics 403 3 — 

Electives 3-4 7-8 

13-14 14-15 

PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

A major in food and nutrition has two options: Option I: Food and Nutri- 
tion and Option II: Dietetics. This program offers preparation for technical 
laboratory work leading to advanced study and meets the requirements of the 
American Dietetic Association for approved internships. 

PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

The option in food and nutrition provides preparation for a position as an 
assistant technician in a research laboratory but it is designed primarily for 
entrance into graduate study. A student desiring to meet the requirements of 
The American Dietetic Association for an approved internship may qualify 
by taking courses listed under Requirements for Areas of Specialization 
in Dietetics. 

OPTION I: FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Home Economics 101 1 — 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Physical Education 101, 101 1 1 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 116 and 107, 117 _5 _5 

17 16 

•Students in the general clothing and textiles program may subsitute clothing and textiles electives 
for these courses. 



64 Department of Home Economics 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 
Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 

Merchanidising 122 2 — 

Zoology 160, 461 4 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Bacteriology 121 — 4 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Chemistry 221, 223 and 222, 224 __5 __5 

17 16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Food and Nutrition 337, 338 3 3 

Chemistry 231,232 and 651 5 5 

Food and Nutrition 130, 331 4 2 

Food and Nutrition 436 — 3 

Physics 201 3 — 

Electives __2_ 3 

17 16 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Home Economics 401, 403 3 3 

Food and Nutrition 635, 637 3 3 

Food and Nutrition 630 — 3 

Electives _7_ __3 

13 12 



PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN DIETETICS 

Minimum Academic Requirements of The American Dietetic 
Association for Specialization in an Area of Dietetics 
The program outlined below meets the minimum basic requirements of 
The American Dietetic Association. Areas of specialization should be selected 
in consultation with the academic advisor. Completion of the basic plus the 
area of specialization requirements which follow will prepare a graduate for 
an approved American Dietetic Association internship. 



Department of Home Economics 



65 



OPTION 2: DIETETICS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Zoology 160, 461 4 

Home Economics 101 1 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 101, 101 1 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 

Merchandising 122 — 

15 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

4 

3 
3 

1 

_2 

16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 104, 114 and 105, 115 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Food Administration 344 3 

Food Administration 345, 346 — 

Home Economics 401 , 403 _3_ 

16 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

4 

3 



6 
_3 
16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics 301 3 

Food and Nutrition 337 3 

Bacteriology 121 4 

Psychology 435 3 

Food Administration 448 — 

Food and Nutrition 130, 331 4 

Area of Specialization Requirements 

and/ or Electives 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



11 
17 



Senior Year 



Course and Number 
Area of Specialization Requirements 
and/ or Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 

14 
14 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

13 
13 



66 Department of Home Economics 

REQUIREMENTS FOR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION IN DIETETICS 



General Dietetics 

Chemistry 251 
Chemistry 252 

Sociology 100 

Home Economics 338 



Recommended 
Mathematics 224 

or 
Mathematics 240 



Elementary Biochemistry 2 

Elementary Biochemistry 

Laboratory 1 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Diet Therapy 3 

9 

Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 3 

Introduction to the Programming 

of Digital Computers 3 



Clinical and Therapeutic 

Chemistry 251 
Chemistry 252 

Sociology 100 
Home Economics 338 
Home Economics 630 
Mathematics 224 

or 
Mathematics 240 



Elementary Biochemistry 2 

Elementary Biochemistry 

Laboratory 1 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Diet Therapy 3 

Advanced Nutrition 3 

Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 3 

Introduction to the Programming 

of Digital Computers __3_ 

18 



Community Nutrition 

Chemistry 251 
Chemistry 252 

Sociology 100 
Home Economics 338 
Home Economics 630 
Mathematics 224 

or 
Sociology 302 



Elementary Biochemistry 2 

Elementary Biochemistry 

Laboratory 1 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Diet Therapy 3 

Advanced Nutrition 3 

Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 3 

Social Statistics I 3 

15 



Department of Home Economics 



67 



Management 

Business Administration 204 
Business Administration 305 
Business Administration 569 

Accounting 221 
Accounting 222 
Accounting 446 
Mathematics 224 

or 
Mathematics 240 



Introduction to Business 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Personnel Organization and 

Management 3 

Principles of Accounting I 3 

Principles of Accounting II 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 3 

Introduction to the Programming 

of Digital Computers 3 

21 



PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

This program provides a broad knowledge of children through the study of 
their growth, development and relationships. Students can select supporting 
courses in psychology, sociology, food and nutrition or other areas of special 
interest. A variety of appropriate experiences with young children, their families 
and community agencies is an integral part of the program. Employment op- 
portunities for students in this curriculum include teachers and/or supervisors 
of pre-school groups (Head Start, Day Care, Nursery Schools, public and pri- 
vate); Child Care Specialists in Federal, State, and County Service Programs; 
Media consultant for Children's Programs; Community Service Agencies; and for 
graduate school. 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102, or 111 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 101, 102 1 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 

Merchandising 122 2 

Home Economics 101 1 

Food and Nutrition 133 3 

Child Development 315 — 

Health Education 200 — 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
1 



3 

_2 
15 



68 



Department of Home Economics 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Child Development 311, 312 3 

Physical Science 100 4 

Zoology 461 — 

Art 101 or 226 3 

Sociology 100 — 

Speech & Drama 250 — 

Child Development 414 
Materials, Methods & Evaluation I . . . 

16 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 



18 



Junior Year 



Course and Number 
Child Development 416 

Play-Materials & Equipment 

Child Development 415 

Materials, Methods & Evaluation II . . 
Child Development 417 Parent Education 

Food and Nutrition 437 

Home Economics 400, 403 

Child Development 420 

Day Care Services 

Psychology 434, 435 

Abnormal Psychology 

Educational Psychology 
Music 609 

Music in Early Childhood 

Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



_3 

17 



15 



Senior Year 

Course and Number 
Child Development 418 

Curriculum Planning 

Child Development 519 

Practicum in Nursery School 

Child Development 419 

Practicum in Community Agencies 

Child Development 612 . . 

Home Economics 401 

Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



2 
3 

_1_ 
12 



Department of Home Economics 



69 



PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The basic program in Home Economics Education is designed for students 
to develop competencies needed for teaching Consumer-Home Economics 
in public schools. Focus areas provide opportunities for the student to gain 
greater depth in subject matter; increased understanding of special groups of 
learners; preparation for interrelated professional careers with business, in- 
dustry, and service organizations concerned with individual and family devel- 
opment. The program also served as an exploratory base for graduate study. 

FOCUS AREAS 

Adult Education Education for Disadvantaged 

and/ or Handicapped 

Child Development & Family 
Relations Food and Nutrition 

Clothing and Textiles Middle School Education 

Consumer Education & Management Occupational Education & 

Career Awareness 

The student must seriously assume the responsibility of selecting the focus 
area and electives to complete requirements of the program based on individual 
ability, needs, and interests by the end of the freshman year. The selection 
of electives should be made in consultation with the student's advisor. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Sociology 100 or 200 — 3 

Home Economics 101 1 — 

Physical Education 101 1 — 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 

Merchandising 122 2 — 

Food and Nutrition 130 4 — 

Health Education 200 — 2 

Home Economics 200 _— _ _2^ 

17 16 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 104, 114; 105, 115 4 4 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 

Merchandising 123 3 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Art 226 3 — 

Speech 250 — 2 

Education 301 — 2 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Clothing, Textiles & Related 

Art 321 — 4 

Food and Nutrition 331 j^ _2_ 

16 17 



70 



Department of Home Economics 



Junior Year 

Course and Number 

Home Economics 300 

Economics 301 

Child Development 311 

Food and Nutrition 337 

Home Economics 400 

Home Economics 403 

Zoology 461 or 469 

Home Economics 500 

Home Economics 502, 503 

Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



4 
_3 
16 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 



16 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 3 

Home Economics 401 3 

Home Economics 505 3 

Education 528, 560 3 

Home Economics 604 — 

Electives _4_ 

16 
Junior Year Alternate 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Home Economics 300 3 

Child Development 311 3 

Food and Nutrition 337 3 

Home Economics 400 3 

Education 400 3 

Home Economics 401 — 

Home Economics 403 — 

Zoology 461 or 469 — 

Home Economics 500 — 

Education 528 — 

Electives 3 

18 
Senior Year Alternate 



Course and Number 

Economics 301 

Home Economics 502 
Home Economics 504 
Home Economics 505 

Education 560 

Home Economics 604 
Electives 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



6 

2 

_2 

10 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

16 



I Semester 


Spring Semester 


Credit 


Credit 


— 


3 


— 


2 


— 


2 


— 


3 


6 


— 


2 


— 


2 


4 


10 


14 



Department of Home Economics 



71 



9 - 12 hours — Electives 
Curriculum— Suggested Courses 

I. General Education 

Communication Skills 
212 - 100 Freshman Composition I 
212 - 101 Freshman Composition II 
215 - 250 Speech 

Humanities and Art 

212 - 200 Survey of Humanities I 
212 - 201 Survey of Humanities II 
211 - 101 Design I 

Social Science 

223-100 History of 

World Civilization I 
233 - 101 History of 

World Civilization II 
320 - 320 General Psychology 
235 - 100 Principles of Sociology 

or 
235 - 200 Introduction to 

Anthropology 
231 - 301 Principles of Economics 

or 
231 - 302 Principles of Economics 



Hours for graduation 124 - 127 



53 Semester 
Hours 

8 
3S.H. 
3S.H. 
2S.H. 



3S.H. 
3S.H. 
3S.H. 

15 

3S.H. 

3S.H. 

3S.H. 
3S.H. 



3S.H. 
3S.H. 

3 S.H. 



Natural Science 



12 



223 - 101 General Chemistry I 

or 
223 - 104 General Chemistry IV 
223 - 102 General Chemistry II 

or 
223 - 105 General Chemistry V 
221 - 461 Human Anatomy & 
Physiology 

or 
221 - 469 Human Anatomy 

Mathematics 

225 - 101 Freshman Mathematics I 
225 - 102 Freshman Mathematics II 



4 S.H. 



4 S.H. 

4 S.H. 
4 S.H. 

4 S.H. 

4 S.H. 



3 S.H. 
3 S.H. 



Physical Education and Health 

330 - 101 Fundamentals of Physical 

Education 
330 - 200 Health Education 



1 S.H. 

2 S.H. 



72 



Department of Home Economics 



II. Technical Education 

Food Nutrition 

170-130 Food Preparation 
170-133 Family Foods 
(unless exempted by performance test) 
or 
170 - 331 Meal Planning & Table 

Service 
170 - 337 Nutrition & Dietetics 

or 
170 - 435 Nutrition Education 



48 - 49 Semester Hours 

10-9 
4S.H. 
3S.H. 



2S.H. 
3S.H. 

3S.H. 



Clothing, Textiles and Fashion 
Merchandising 

170 - 122 Clothing for the Family 2 S.H. 

(unless exempted by performance test) 
170 - 123 Textiles 3 S.H. 

170 - 321 Family Clothing 

Construction 4 S.H. 

(unless exempted by performance test) 

Housing 

170 - 400 Contemporary Housing 3 S.H. 

170 - 502 Equipment 2 S.H. 

170 - 503 Interior Design 2 S.H. 

or 

170 - 504 Home Furnishing 2 S.H. 

Child Development and Family Relationship 

170 - 311 Child Development I 3 S.H. 

170 - 401 Marriage and Family 
Relationship 3 S.H. 

Consumer Education & Management 

170 - 403 Consumer Problems 3 S.H. 

170 - 505 Home Management 
Residence 3 S.H. 



Home Economics Education 

170 - 101 Introduction to Home 

Economics 
170 - 200 Introduction to Home 

Economics Education 
170 - 300 Program Planning in 

Home Economics 
170 - 500 Occupational Home 

Economics 
170 - 604 Seminar 



11 



1S.H. 

2 S.H. 

3 S.H. 

3 S.H. 
2 S.H. 



Department of Home Economics 73 

III. Professional Education 14 Semester Hours 

310 - 301 Philosophical and 

Sociological Foundations 

of Education 2 S.H. 

310 - 400 Psychological Foundations 

of Education — Growth and 

Development 3 S.H. 

210 - 528 Methods and Evaluation 

in Home Economics 3 S.H. 

310 - 560 Observation and Student 

Teaching 6 S.H. 

IV. Electives — Focus Areas 9-12 Semester Hours 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN FOOD SCIENCE 

The Departments of Home Economics and Animal Science offer the Bachelor 
of Science degree in Food Science in cooperation with North Carolina State 
University at Raleigh. The Food Science Program, as outlined with the offer- 
ings of the Department of Animal Science, provides an opportunity for the 
student to complete all course requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
as approved by the Institute of Food Technologists. 

The first three years of prescribed work are completed at North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University and the thirty semester hour (30) 
concentration in Food Science required during the fourth year is completed 
at North Carolina State University at Raleigh. For complete description of 
Food Science Program, see offerings of the Department of Animal Science. 



COURSES IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Undergradutate 

311. Child Development I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the Child's sequential development at different stages — concep- 
tion through late childhood. Laboratory observation required. 

312. Child Development II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A comprehensive study of the physical, mental, and psychological factors 
of development for the late childhood through adulthood. Observation re- 
quired. (Prerequisite CD 311) 

315. Introduction to Child and Family Development. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the historical background and present day philosophies of child 
development and programs for young children. Laboratory observation and 
participation required. 

414. Materials, Methods and Evaluation I. Credit 3(2-2) 

Materials, methods, and evaluations used in the development of cogni- 
tive, affective, and psychomotor behaviors. Focus areas: Language Arts, 
Creative and Dramatic Arts. Laboratory experiences required. (Prerequisite 
CD 311.) 



74 Department of Home Economics 

415. Materials, Methods and Evaluation II. Credit 3(2-2) 

Materials, methods, and evaluation used in the development of cognitive, 
affective and psychomotor behaviors. Focus areas: Mathematics, Health and 
Safety, Science and Social Studies. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisite 
CD 311.) 

416. Play Materials and Equipment for the Preschool Child. Credit3(3-0) 

The importance of play in all aspects of child development as related to 
cognitive, affective, and psychomotor behaviors. Materials, equipment, and 
their uses in a functional school environment will be explored. (Prerequisite 
CD 414, 415.) 

417. Parent Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

Parental interaction in the child's development at home, in the school, and 
in the community. The effective use of assistance and volunteers in the school 
environment. 

418. Curriculum in Preschool Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

Curriculum planning, the integrated day, scheduling, room arrangement and 
the classroom environment. (Prerequisite CD 414, 415, 416.) 

419. Practicum in Community Services. Credit 3(1-4) 

Practical field experiences in community service agencies concerned with 
all areas of child care and family development. Emphasis will be placed on 
services to young children. Field placement required. (Prerequisite CD 413.) 

420. Day Care Service. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the organization, administration, operation and licensing of day 
care services. Community personnel, services and facilities will be incorporated 
in the study of current issues related to day care. Field observation required. 
(Prerequisite CD 311.) 

519. Practicum in Nursery School. Credit 3(1-4) 

Practice teaching with a group of preschool children. Prerequisite CD 414, 
415, 416.) CD 418 may be taken concurrently. 

612. Senior Seminar. Credit 2(2-0) 

A review of recent research findings and discussions of current trends and 
information related to young children. 



Graduate 

715. Special Problems in Child Development Credit 3(3-0) 

Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups on child 
development problems of special interest. Work may represent either survey of 
a given field or intensive investigation of a particular problem. The student should 
consult the instructor before registering for this course. 



Department of Home Economics 75 

COURSES IN CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND 
FASHION MERCHANDISING— UNDERGRADUATE 

122. Clothing Study and Selection Credit 2(2-0) 

A basic study of the clothing needs of the individual and family based on 
physical and non-physical aspects with emphasis on social and psychological 
concepts. 

123. Textiles Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to the study of textiles, their sources, characteristics and pro- 
duction; the performance, use and care of fabrics. 

124. History of Costume Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the study of textiles and costume from ancient to modern 
times. 

126. Theory and Fundamental of Fashion 

Illustrations Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the theory and development of fashion sketching techniques, in- 
cluding the sources of design. 

321. Basic Clothing Construction Credit 4(1-6) 

Fundamental principles of clothing construction based on the use of the com- 
mercial pattern. Emphasis is placed on altering the commercial pattern to 
achieve good fit. Prerequisites: Home Economics 122 and 123. 

422. Dress Design and Pattern Study Credit 4(1-6) 

The application of art principles in creating dress design by the methods of 
draping and flat pattern making. Prerequisite: Home Economics 122 and 321. 

423. Advanced Clothing Construction Credit 4(1-6) 

The application of advanced construction and soft tailoring techniques toward 
the development of garments for personal use. Laboratory experiences will con- 
trast the two techniques and emphasize the use of wool and other woven 
fabrics. 

425. Aspects of Dress Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of the interaction of the social, psychological and economics 
aspects of dress. 

426. Problems in Clothing, Textiles and 

A, B, C, Fashion Merchandising Credit 3(3-0) 

Independent study of special problems in selected areas of clothing, textiles, 
or fashion merchandising. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

521. Field Experience Credit 4(0-9) 

A, B, C, 

A course designed to give the student practical experiences in one of the 
areas of clothing, textiles, fashion merchandising or retailing. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 



76 Department of Home Economics 

523. Seminar in Fashion Apparel Fundamentals Credit 4(2-4) 

Discussion of current trends in fashion apparel, fashion coordination and 
analysis of the functions of fashion merchandising, field trips to fashion centers. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

525. Fashion Marketing and Merchandising Credit 3(3-0) 

A synthesis of business knowledge and its application to fashion field. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

623. Textile Chemistry Credit 3(1-4) 

An introduction to the chemistry of the major classes of natural and man-made 
fibers, including their structure, properties, and reactions. Laboratory work 
will include consideration of chemical damage to fabrics, finishes, and dyes. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 104 and 105, Textiles 123. 

624. Advanced Textiles Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of textiles fibers and fabrics 
with emphasis on recent scientific and techniological developments. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economics 122. 

625. Experimental Clothing and Textiles Credit 3(1-4) 

Independent experimentation with new fabrics and finishes, including furs 
and leathers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

626. Tailoring Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of the principles of hard tailoring with emphasis on comparing the 
various methods and analyzing tailored garments. 



COURSES IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Undergraduate 

130. Food Preparation. Credit 4(2-4) 

The application of scientific principles to food preparation and preservation. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 102 or 105, or concurrent. 

131. Elementary Food Preparation. Credit 4(2-2) 

A course designed to create an understanding of the basic techniques used 
in food preparation and to develop skill in using these procedures in the pro- 
duction of standard products. 

133. Family Food. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the application of elementary principles of nutrition and cookery 
to the planning, preparation and serving of simple meals designed to meet 
the needs of all family members. 

236. Introduction to Food Science. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the chemical and physical properties of components of basic raw 
foods and behavior of the components during processing and storage. Prere- 
quisites: Chemistry 105, 115, or 222, 224. 



Department of Home Economics 77 

331. Meal Management. Credit 2(1-2) 

Consideration of the management of human and physical resources in the 
planning, preparing and serving of meals to meet the needs of families of 
varying sizes, incomes and ages. Prerequisite: Home Economics 130 or 131. 

332. Cultural Aspects of Food. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the influence of cultural and socio-economics factors on food 
patterns and nutritional status of selected ethnic groups. 

337. Introduction to Human Nutrition. Credit 3(3-2) 
(Also Food Science 337) 

An introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to hu- 
man requirements for food nutrients; significance and mechanism through 
which nutrients meet these biological needs during the life cycle. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 105, 115 or 222, 224 and Biology 461. 

338. Diet Therapy. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of dietary modifications necessary in the treatment of pathologic 
conditions. Prerequisite: F&N 337. 

344. Institution Organization and Management I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the organization, management and administration of food service 
establishments. 

345. Institution Organization and Management II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of IM 344 with emphasis on personnel management. 

346. Institution Purchasing. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the problems involved in the purchase of food and other expend- 
able supplies for food service establishments. 

439. Child Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to study the nutritional influence on the growth and 
development of humans through adolescence with emphasis on the interpre- 
tation of relevant research. Prerequisite: Home Economics 337. 

447. Institution Equipment. Credit 5(3-4) 

A study of the selection, care and use of equipment for quantity food pre- 
paration and service. Interpretation of blueprints and specifications will be 
considered. 

448. Quantity Cookery. Credit 4(1-6) 

The application of the principles of cookery to the preparation and service 
of food for group feeding with emphasis on menu planning, work schedules, 
cost and portion control. Prerequisite: F&N 130. 

535. Nutrition Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to assist in the development of nutrition education pro- 
grams in the school and community. 



78 Department of Home Economics 

540. Geriatric Nutrition. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the application of the principles of nutrition in relation to body 
changes in the elderly citizens. Prerequisite: Home Economics 337. 

544. Field Experience in Food Administration. Credit 3(0-6) 

Individualized experiences in off-campus food service establishments. 

549. Advanced Quantity Cookery. Credit 3(2-2) 

Continuation of FN 448. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

630. Advanced Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic 
food nutrients in human biochemical functions. Prerequisites: Home Eco- 
nomics 337 and Chemistry 251, 252 or equivalent. 

631. Advanced Food Science. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Also Food Science 631) 

Advanced discussion and experimentation with the chemical and physical 
changes of food during processing and storage. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 436 or equivalent. 

632. Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the elementary principles of nutrition and their influence on 
the growth and development of children. Special consideration is given to nu- 
trition education techniques to be used with children and parents in preschool 
centers and elementary schools. 

635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition. Credit 3(06) 

Laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutri- 
tion research. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. 

636. Food Promotion. Credit 4(1-6) 

A course which gives experiences in the development and testing of recipes. 
Opportunities will be provided for demonstrations, writing and photography 
with selected businesses. 

637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition. Credit 3(0-6) 

Individualized research on a selected problem in food or nutrition. Prere- 
quisite: Home Economics 635. 

645. Special Problems in Food Administration. Credit 2(0-4) 
Individual work on special problems in food administration. 

646. Readings in Food Administration. Credit 1(1-0) 

A study of food administration through reports and discussion of articles in 
current trade periodicals and scientific journals. 



Department of Home Economics 79 

647. Seminar in Food Administration. Credit 1(1-0) 

Discussion of problems involved in the organization and management of 
specialized food service areas. 

Graduate 

730. Nutrition in Health and Disease. Credit 5(3-4) 

Significance of nutrition in health and disease. Consideration of: (1) the 
methods of appraisal of human nutritional status to include clinical, dietary, 
biochemical, and anthropometric techniques, (2) various biochemical para- 
meters used to diagnose and treatment of the disorders, and (3) the role of diet 
as a therapeutic tool. (Prerequisite: Home Economics 630 or equivalent. 

733. Nutrition During Growth and Development. Credit 3(2-2) 

Nutritional, genetical and environmental influences on human growth and 
development. (Prerequisite: Home Economics 603 or equivalent). 

734. Nutrition Education. Credit 3(2-2) 

Interpretation of the results of nutrition research for use with lay groups. 
Preparation of teaching materials based on research for use in nutrition educa- 
tion programs. 

735. Experimental Foods. Credit 4(1-6) 

Objective and subjective evaluation of food; development and testing of 
recipes; experimentation with food. (Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition 436 or 
its equivalent.) 

736. Research Methods in Food and Nutrition. Credit 4(2-6) 

Experimental procedures in food and nutrition research; care of experi- 
mental animals; analysis of food, body fluids, animal tissues. (Prerequisites: 
Analytical Chemistry and Biochemistry.) 

738. Food Testing and Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of factors affecting the color, flavor, odor and texture of foods through 
the use of subjective and objective testing methods. (Prerequisite: H.Ec. 436 
or equivalent.) 

739. Thesis Research. Credit 3(0-6) 
Research problems in food or nutrition. 

740. Community Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Individualized work or team teaching or guest speakers) 

Application of the principles of nutrition to various community nutrition 
problems of specific groups (geriatrics, preschoolers, adolescents and expect- 
ant mothers). Evaluation of nutrition programs of public health and social 
welfare agencies at local, state, federal and international levels. 

741. Current Trends in Food Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

Recent developments in food science and their implications for teachers, 
nutritionists, extension workers, and dietitions. 



80 Department of Home Economics 

742. Cultural and Social Aspects of Food and Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

Sociological, psychological, and economical background of ethnic groups 
and their influence on food consumption patterns, and nutritional status. 

743. Food Preservation. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of current methods of preserving foods — canning, freezing, dehydra- 
tion, radiation and fermentation. (Prerequisite: H.Ec. 436 or equivalent. 

744. Seminar in Food & Nutrition. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Required of all graduates in Food and Nutrition.) 

Lecture and discussion by faculty, students, and guests. 

745. Practicum in Food or Nutrition. Credit 3(0-6) 
Field experiences with private or public agencies. 

746. Internship in Home Economics Education. Credit 6(0-12) 

Internship in Home Economics Education is required of any person who has 
not had previous teaching experience. Internship must include an extended 
period of involvement in a school's program during a regular school term. 
Internship will provide opportunity for participation in the total school pro- 
gram including, curriculum, work with teachers, administrators, students 
and parents. 



COURSES IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

236. Introduction to Food Science. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Food & Nutrition 236) 

An introductory study of the nature of raw foods and behavior of food com- 
ponents during handling and processing. The key methods and principles of 
food preservation and processing will also be discussed. 

337. Introduction to Human Nutrition Credit 3(3-2) 

(Also Food & Nutrition 337) 

An introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to hu- 
man requirements for food nutrients; significance and mechanism through 
which nutrients meet these biological needs during the life cycle. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 105, 115, or 222, 224, and Biology 461. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

631. Advanced Food Science. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Also Food & Nutrition 631) 

A study of the chemical and physical properties of components of raw foods 
and behavior of the food components during processing and storage. 



Department of Home Economics 81 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Undergraduate 

101. Introduction to Home Economics. Credit 1(1-0) 

A course designed to assist students in making personal adjustments to col- 
lege living; an introduction to the board areas of home economics; a study of 
the home economics curricula and professional opportunities in the field. 



104. The Individual and His Family. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the interrelationships of the individual and his family through- 
out the life cycle with emphasis on health as it is related to the well-being of 
the family. 

105. Social Usage. Credit 1(1-0) 

A course intended for the person who desires to enrich living with gracious- 
ness and accepted standards in our present day society. 

200. Introduction to Home Economics Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

Historical background, philosophy and objectives of education in the 
United States; educational, social and political movements affecting Voca- 
tional Education in the public schools with emphasis on the requirements of 
North Carolina. 

300. Program Planning In Home Economics K-12. Credit 3(3-0) 

Planning home economics programs for occupational education in public 
schools K-12. (Career awareness, middle school, exploratory, comprehensive 
occupational home economics, youth and adult programs.) 

301. Health and Home Nursing. Credit 2(2-0) 

Principles and attitudes in home care of the sick, the handicapped, and the 
aged; prevention of illness and promotion of health; prenatal care; prevention 
of home accidents. 

323. Home Furnishings Laboratory Credit 3(1-4) 

Construction for the home, including draperies, shades, curtains, cornices, 
valances, swags, slipcovers, lampshapes, bedspreads, etc. 

324. Fundamentals of Needle Craft Credit 3(1-4) 

Instruction in various crafts and hobbies, including crocheting, knitting, 
macrame and needlepoint. 

400. Contemporary Housing. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of problems in house planning to meet family needs. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of house designs, methods of financing and location. 

401. Marriage and Family Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the interpersonal relationships in contemporary family life; em- 
phasis on the changing nature of family adjustments, goals, values, and roles. 



82 Department of Home Economics 

403. Consumer Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic principles involved in managing personal and family finances with 
emphasis on buying and consumption practices. 

500. Occupational Home Economics. Credit 3(1-4) 

Organization and administration of occupational wage-earning programs 
at the upper high school level — methods and instructional media. Work ex- 
perience required in at least one area of a home economics occupational 
cluster. 

502. Household Equipment. Credit 2(1-2) 

The application of principles and techniques relating to selection, care and 
use of household equipment. 

503. Interior Design. Credit 2(1-2) 

A study of residential interiors with emphasis on art principles and their 
relationship to furniture styles and accessories in decorating the home. 

504. Home Furnishings. Credit 2(1-2) 

A study of the problems in home furnishings with emphasis on the selection, 
care, use and practical ways of making the home attractive. 

505. Home Management Residence. Credit 3(1-4) 

Designed to give students experiences in applying the principles of man- 
agement and interpersonal relations to group living. Prerequisites: HEc 403 
and F&N 331 or concurrent. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Adult Education in Home Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

An overview of adult homemaking education: organization, program plan- 
ning, teaching techniques and evaluation. Laboratory experience will be pro- 
vided by working with out-of-school groups. 

603. Special Problems in Home Economics I. Credit 3(1-4) 

Problems in the various areas of home economics may be chosen for in- 
dividual study. 

604. Seminar in Home Economics Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change on 
the various fields of home economics, review of research and professional 
development. 

605. Home Economics Summer Study Abroad. Credit 6(0-12) 

A course designed to provide opportunity for students and specialists to 
study historic and contemporary points of interest abroad. Exposure to cus- 
toms, cultures and industries in an international setting will provide the basis 
for broader background and experience in selected areas of home economics. 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 83 

Graduate 

706. Special Problems in Home Economics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of research and major contemporary issues with consideration of 
their impact on trends and new directions in home economics. 



DEPARTMENT OF PLANT 
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Samuel J. Dunn, Chairman 

The programs in this department are designed to give the students broad 
scientific and technical training which will enable them to take advantage of the 
many job opportunities available in the various areas of concentration. There 
is considerable flexibility in the programs to allow for a choice of electives 
which may better serve the individual needs of the students. 

The department offers program leading to the B.S. degree in Agricultural 
Science with options, Agricultural Technology with options, and the BSLA 
(Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture.) 

Majors in Agricultural Science or Agricultural Technology may elect options 
in (1) Agronomy with emphasis on Crop Science or Soil Science, (2) Horticul- 
ture, or (3) Agricultural Engineering by following the appropriate curriculum 
outlined in the catalog. In addition to the B.S. degree in Landscape Architec- 
ture the department offers an option in Earth and Environmental Science in 
order to provide instruction for the general education requirements for stu- 
dents who seek a broader understanding of their rather complex surround- 
ings. 



PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

The following options are offered in the department of Plant Science and 
Technology leading to the B.S. degree in Agricultural Technology. 

Option A — (Horticulture, Plant Science and Soil Science) 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140, 160 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Air or Military Science or (Elective) _1_ _1_ 

15 15 



84 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 2 

Plant Science 110; 

Animal Science 301 3 3 

Soil Science 338; 

Poultry Science 317 4 3 

Health Education 200; 

Air or Military Science or (Electives). . _2_ _3_ 

17 17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 
Course and Number Credit Credit 

Bacteriology 121; 

Plant Pathology 530 4 4 

Economics 301; 

Agricultural Economics 330 
Technical Physics 211, & 212 
*Electives (Major Area) 



3 


3 


4 


4 


6 


6 


17 


17 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 
Credit 


Spring Semester 
Credit 


3 


3 


; 304 ... . 3 
1 


3 
1 


10 


10 


17 


17 



Course and Number 
Plant Propagation 334; 

Geology 309 

Agricultural Engineering 303 & 304 
Plant Science Seminar 520 
* Electives (Major Area) .... 



OPTIONAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

The following options are offered in the department of Plant Science and 
Technology leading to the B.S. degree in Agricultural Science: 

A. Options in Horticulture, Plant Science, or Soil Science 

B. Option in Agricultural Engineering 

C. Option in Earth and Environmental Science 



"The 30 credits required as major electives in Plant Science and Soil Science are to be taken such that: 
12 credits are elected from supporting courses; 18 credits are elected from one of the optional areas with 
approval of the advisor. 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 85 

OPTION A - HORTICULTURE, PLANT SCIENCE, SOIL SCIENCE 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Air or Military Science or (Elective) .... _1_ __\^ 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 2 

Agricultural Engineering 113; 

Animal Science 301 3 3 

Plant Science 110; 

Poultry Science 317 3 3 

Health Education 200; 

Air 6r Military Science or (Electives). . _2_ _2_ 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 211, 212 4 4 

Chemistry 221, 222 3 3 

Soil Science 338 — 4 

Economics 301 — 3 

Electives (Major Area) 7 2 

Electives 4 2 

18 18 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 224 3 _ 

Agricultural Economics 330 3 — 

Bacteriology 121 — 4 

Electives (Major Area) _6_ Jj^ 

12 16 



86 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

Supporting Courses 

Mathematics 221, 222. 

Bacteriology 421; Botany 430, 432, 530; Chemistry 221, 222, 431, 441, 442. 
Zoology 466, 468, Agricultural Economics 332; Chemistry 222, 251. 
Economics 302, 401, 501, 415, 310. 

OPTION B — AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Freshamn Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 102 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 116, 117 5 5 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 _1_ _J_ 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 " 2 2 

Physics 221, 222 5 5 

Plant Science 110; Agric. Eng. 113 3 3 

Electives _2 _2_ 

18 18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Soil Sci. 338; Bacteriology 121 4 4 

Economics 301, Agric. Econ., 330 3 3 

Mechanical Engr. 335, 336 4 4 

Poultry Sci., 317, Animal Sci. 301 3 3 

Agric. Engr. 303, 304 _3 _3_ 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Agric. Engr. 401, 402 3 3 

Mechanical Engr. 337, 361 3 3 

Agric. Engr. 523 3 — 

Mech. Engr. 441 — 3 

Electives 7 7 

16 16 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 87 



Supporting Courses 

Agricultural Engineering 524, 600, 602; Mechanical Engineering 260, 442-560; 
Mach.300. 

OPTION C — EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Freshman Composition 100, 101 3 3 

History of World Civilization 100, 101 . . 3 3 

Math 111, 113 4 4 

Physical Ed. 101, 102 1 1 

Plant Science 110; 

Major Elective 3 3 

Botany 140; 

Zoology 160 4 4 

Air or Military Science (1) (1) 

18 18 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 2 

Soil Science 338; 

Bacteriology 121 4 4 

Geography 322; 

Math 224 3 3 

Earth Science 624, 309 _J3_ _3 

18 18 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 221, 222 3 3 

Econ. 301, 302 3 3 

Physics 225, 226 4 4 

Earth Science 330; 

Agric. Engr. 304 3 3 

Agric. Engr. 401; 

Math 240 3 3 

Plant Science 520 _1_ _J_ 

17 17 



88 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Earth Science 616, 626 3 3 

Agric. Engr. 524; 

Gen. Forestry 618 3 3 

Major Electives 8 5 

Crop Science 607 _3_ 

14 14 



PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 
Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 101, 102 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140 ; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Air or Military Science or (Elective) . . 1 1 

15 15 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

Plant Science 110; 

Soil Science 338 3 4 

Economics 301; 

Agricultural Economics 330 3 3 

Health Education 200; 

Plant Science Seminar 520 1 1 

Air or Military Science (Elective) .... 2 2 



16 



17 



Junior Year 



Course and Number 
Bacteriology 121 ; 

Plant Pathology 530 

Agricultural Economics 332; 

Agricultural Economics 334 
Soil Science 517: Geology 309 
*Electives (Major Area) 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 



Credit 



Credit 



17 



17 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 89 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 
Entomology 468; 

Plant Taxonomy 430 4 4 

Business Administration 204; 

Principles of Accounting 1 3 3 

Business Mgr. 305; 

Business Law 451 3 3 

*Electives (Major Area) 7 7 

17 17 



COURSES IN PLANT SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

110. Plant Science I. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1400) 

An introduction to the basic principles underlying the production of eco- 
nomic crops. Brief introduction to drug and medical plants. (Prerequisite 
Bot. 140) 

300. Plant Science II. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Plant Science 1420) 

History, classification, culture and utilization of economic plants; basic 
physical, economical and social conditions relating to their growth, distribution 
and improvement. (Prerequisite PI. Sc. 338.) 

520. Seminar in Plant Science and Technology. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 1460) 

Current problems in Plant Science and Technology. Designed especially 
for unifying the three major areas of the department by involving both the staff 
and junior and senior students. 

618. General Forestry. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1412) 

History, classification, culture, and utilization of native trees, with special 
emphasis on their importance as a conservation resource and the making of 
national forestry policy. (Prerequisite: Botany 140) 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Undergraduate 

113. Agricultural Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 

Lettering, use of instruments, projection drawing, auxiliaries, dimension- 
ing, isometric drawing, working drawings-structural, and graphics (charts 
& graphs). 



90 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

114. Home and Farm Maintenance. Credit 3(4-1) 

Selection, sharpening, care and correct use of shop tools and equipment; 
woodwork and simple carpentry; simple electrical repairs; sheet metal work; 
electric arc and oxyacetylene welding; pipe fitting and simple plumbing re- 
pairs. 

303. Field Machinery. Credit 3(1-4) 

Principles of operation, selection and the study of field machinery effici- 
ency. 

304. Structures and Environment. Credit 3(1-4) 

Fundamentals of building construction, applied to location, selection of 
materials, foundations, planning farm structures, and environmental con- 
siderations such as temperature, humidity, condensation and ventilation. 

401. Surveying, Drainage, and Soil Conservation. Credit 3(1-4) 

Principles of surveying (instrumentation-area computations), drainage, 
planning of soil erosion and drainage systems, based on topographical and 
soil requirements. 

402. Farm Power. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1442) 

Principles of mechanical power, use, care and adjustment of internal com- 
bustion engines. (Prerequisite Physics 225.) 

522. Dairy Engineering. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1462) 

The general engineering principles of power selection, installation and 
maintenance, refrigeration and heat transfer as they apply to equipment used 
in the dairy industry. Also plant arrangement and management for dairy 
science majors. 

523. Electric Power. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1463) 

The study of electricity, electrical wiring, and electrical devices including 
motors, with particular emphasis upon the relation of these to the home and 
farm. (Prerequisite Physics 201, 225.) 

524. Water Supply and Sanitation for Farm and Home. Credit 3(1-4) 

The planning and installation of farm water, such as source, quantity, 
quality, treatment and sanitation systems. 

525. Farm Shop Organization and Management. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1465) 

A course designed for prospective and in-service teachers of vocational 
agriculture; includes presentation of purpose, plans and equipment of shops, 
organization of course of study and methods of teaching. (Prerequisite Ag. 
Engr. 114; Ag. Ed. 501.) 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 91 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Conservation, Drainage and Irrigation. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1475) 

Improvement of soil by use and study of conservation practices, engineer- 
ing structures, and irrigation systems. (Prerequisite Ag. Engr. 401.) 

601. Advanced Farm Shop. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1476) 

Care, operation and maintenance of farm shop power equipment. (Pre- 
requisite Ag. Engr. 114.) 

602. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1477) 

Special work in Agricultural Engineering on problems of special interest 
to the student. Open to seniors in Agricultural Engineering. 



COURSES IN CROP SCIENCE 



Undergraduate 



307. Forage Crops. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1427) 

Grasses, legumes and other plants and their uses as hay, pasture, silage 
and special purpose of forages, identification of plants and seeds and study 
of quality in hay, silage and pasture population. (Prerequisite Plant Science 
110.) 

405. Determining Crop Quality. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1445) 

The recognition of high quality crop products as influenced by growth and 
maturity factors, weeds and diseases, determination of commercial quality 
through study, land use and grades; identification of crops, planning crops 
exhibits. (Prerequisite Plant Science 300.) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

603. Plant Chemicals. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1478) 

A study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used in 
the production of economic plants. (Prerequisite Chem. 102 and PI. Sc. 300.) 

604. Crop Ecology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1479) 

The physical environment and its influence on crops; geographical distribu- 
tion of crops. 



92 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

605. Breeding of Crop Plants. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1480) 

Significance of crop improvements in the maintenance of crop yields; ap- 
plication of genetic principles and techniques used in the improvement of 
crops; the place of seed certification in the maintenance of verietal purity. 

606. Special Problems in Crops. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1481) 

Designed for students who desire to study special problems in crops. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of six credits. By consent of instructor. 

607. Research Design and Analysis. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1482) 

Experimental designs, methods and techniques of experimentation; appli- 
cation of experimental design to plant and animal research; interpretation of 
experimental data. (Prerequisite Ag. Econ. 644, Math. 224.) 

COURSES IN EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

201. The Earth— Man's Environment. Credit 3(2-2) 

A study of the earth's physical environment as related to climate, natural 
resources and physiography. The interrelationship of man with the earth's 
environment as revealed in the modification of natural processes. No pre- 
requisite. 

309. Elements of Physical Geology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1429) 

Relation of geological principles in the development of a balanced concept 
of the earth and earth history; rock and mineral identification, utilization of 
geological and topography maps, geological processes, resource conservation, 
urban and environmental problems. (Prerequisite Chem. 101 or consent of in- 
structor.) 

330. Elements of Weather and Climate. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1430) 

A study of the fundamental elements of weather conditions as revealed in 
world patterns of climate types. This course surveys the types of land forms 
and makes applications to problems in engineering, military science and in 
planning for agricultural, urban and regional development projects. (Pre- 
requisite E. Sc. 309; Soil Sc. 338, or consent of instructor.) 

408. Aerial Photointerpretation. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Earth Science 343) 

The interpretation of aerial photography as an aid to the study of terrains 
of all types. This course surveys the types of land forms and makes applica- 
tions to problems in engineering, military science and in planning for agricul- 
tural, urban and regional developmental projects. (Prerequisites Ea. Sc. 1429; 
Soil Sc. 1438 or consent of instructor.) 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 93 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of traditional and innovative patterns and problems of managing and 
handling waste products of urban and rural environments, their renovation 
and reclamation. 

624. Earth Science, Geomorphology Credit 3(2-2) 

Various land forms and their evolution — the naturally envolved surface fea- 
tures of the Earth's crust and the processes responsible for their evolution, 
their relation to man's activities and as the foundation for understanding the 
environment. 

625. Earth Resources Credit 3(2-2) 

Conservation, management and use of renewable and non-renewable re- 
sources. Their impact on the social and economic quality of our environment. 

626. Aquaculture Credit 3 (2-2) 

Using water as a natural resource in the production of food, for recreation, 
and wildlife preservation, and its management as it relates to environmental 
problems affecting water quality, with emphasis on freshwater lakes and 
ponds. 

627. Strategies of Conservation Credit 3(2-2) 

An approach to the teaching of environmental conservation as an integral 
part of the general curriculum. 



COURSES IN HORTICULTURE 

Undergraduate 

118. Amateur Floriculture. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1408) 

General principles of growing flowers on a small scale in small greenhouses, 
home, school and public buildings; growing flowers outside for landscape 
effect and cutting. 

119. The Functional Usage of Plant Materials. Credit 3(0-6) 

The use of plants and related materials to enhance temporary settings with 
emphasis on the utilization of horticultural plant materials indoor and out- 
of-doors. Special attention to be given to temporary gardens, planters, interior 
scenes and designs. (No prerequisite). 

334. Plant Propagation. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1434) 

Study of types, construction, and management of propagation structures; 
fundamentals principles of propagation by seed, cuttage, budding, grafting, 
and layerage. (Prerequisite PI. Sc. 110.) 



94 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

335. Principles of Landscape Design. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1433) 

Fundamentals of design of planning the arrangement of small properties, 
such as homes, schools, small parks and playgrounds. 



514. Nursery Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1454) 

Planning, operations and methods used by wholesale, retail, and landscape 
nurseries. Emphasis on cultural practices, records and selling techniques. 
(Prerequisite Hort. 334.) 



527. Basic Floral Design. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 1467) 

Essentials of flower arrangement and plant decorations for the home, office, 
hospital, school and church. 



528. Flower Shop Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1468) 

Designing, planning, handling of merchandise, buying and selling methods, 
and general policies. 



529. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1469) 

Problems in design of land areas with emphasis on orientation, arrangement, 
and circulation. Instruction in planning, presentation, cost accounting, and 
construction. (Prerequisite Hort. 335.) 

530. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1470) 

Continuation of Hort. 530. Problems in design of larger land areas involving 
more complex features; practice in landscape model construction. (Prerequi- 
site Hort. 529.) 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

608. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1483) 

Work along special lines given largely by the project method for advanced 
undergraduate and graduate students who have the necessary preparation. 

610. Commercial Greenhouse Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1449) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse out-of-doors 
with emphasis on cut flowers and outside bedding plants. Special attention 
given to seasonal production. 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 95 

611. Commercial Greenhouse Production. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1450) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse with emphasis on pot plant 
and conservatory plants. Special attention given to seasonal production. (Pre- 
requisite Hort. 334.) 

612. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1452) 

Identification, merits, adaptability, and maintenance of shrubs, trees, and 
vines used in landscape planting trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials. 

613. Plant Materials and Planning Design. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1453) 

Continuation of Hort. 612 with added emphasis on plant combinations and 
use of plants as design elements. 



COURSES IN SOIL SCIENCE 



Undergraduate 

338. Fundamentals of Soil Science. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1438) 

The fundamental nature and properties of soils and introductory treatment 
of soil genesis, morphology, and classification and land use. 

516. Soil Pedology. Credit 3(3-4) 

A detailed examination of theories and concepts concerning the processes 
of soil formation and their relationships to various classification schemes. In 
depth study of concepts treated in Soil Sci. 338. (Prerequisites Soil Sci. 338 
and Chemistry 102.) 

517. Soil Fertility. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1457) 

General principles of soil fertility; influence of chemical, physical and mi- 
crobiological properties of soils on crop production. Application of fertility 
principles in cropping programs. Limited treatment of impact of agricultural 
pollutants on the environment. (Prerequisites Soil Sci. 338, Chem. 101 or 
consent of instructor.) 

518. Soil Fertility Laboratory. 

(Formerly 1458) 

Analytical and diagnostic procedures in studying soil fertility problems. Some 
treatment of procedures useful for examination of problems resulting from 
agricultural pollutants. (Prerequisites Chem. 102; Soil Sci. 338 and 517 or con- 
sent of instructor.) 



96 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

532. Soil Physics. Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of fundamental physical principles and laws which govern the be- 
havior of soils. Physical constitution soil water, and soil air. The relationship 
of soil physical conditions to plant growth and engineering usage. (Prerequisite: 
Soil Sci. 338, Chem. 102, and Math. 113 and consent of instructor. Spring 
terms of even numbered years.) 

533. Soil Genesis and Classification. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 1473) 

Soil genesis, morphology and classification of the major soil groups of the 
United States; techniques of making soil surveys; soil survey interpretation for 
agricultural and non-agricultural uses. Detailed treatment of the Seventh Ap- 
proximation in soil classification. (Prerequisites Soil Sci. 338 and 516.) 

534. Soil Chemistry. Credit 4(2-4) 

Application of physico-chemical principles to soil studies. Consideration 
of mineral composition, crystal structure, types of bonding, nutrient fixation 
and ion exchange. The geochemistry of soil pollution. (Prerequisite: Chem. 
102, Soil Sci. 338, and consent of instructor. Spring of odd numbered years.) 

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 

609. Special Problems in Soils. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1484) 

Research problems in soils for advanced students. (By consent of instructor.) 



GRADUATE COURSE IN CROP SCIENCE 

702. Grass Land Ecology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1491) 



GRADUATE COURSES IN EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

704. Problem Solving in Earth Science. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1493) 

705. The Physical Universe. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1494) 

706. Physical Geology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1495) 

708. Conservation of Natural Resources. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1496) 

709. Seminar In Earth Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1497) 

GRADUATE COURSE IN SOILS 

710. Soils of North Carolina. 

(Formerly Soils 1499) 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 97 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Landscape Architecture is a profession concerned with quality of land use. 
It includes analysis of environmental and social factors and recommendations 
for preservation, the design, construction and maintenance of developed land 
areas. The scale and scope of projects vary from broad regional landscape 
analysis to detailed site planning. 

This curriculum is planned to equip the student to deal with a wide range of 
environmental design problems. Sequence of required courses develops under- 
standing of landscape design theory, practice and construction techniques. Elec- 
tive and optional course offerings provide the student an opportunity to con- 
centrate in an area of individual interest. 

The student majoring in landscape architecture may select one of three op- 
tional elective tracks: (1) urban advocacy, (2) regional planning or (3) office 
practice/governmental administration. 

The curriculum is a sequence of three levels. After completing the basic 
level, a review will be scheduled for each student majoring landscape architec- 
ture. The students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in order 
to advance to next level. A Second review and recommendations will be scheduled 
after completing the intermediate level. Students who have earned an accumu- 
lative average of 3.0 or above may be excused from this review process. 

The following curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science in Landscape 
Architecture. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURAL CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

1st Semester 

English 100 (Ideas and Their Expression I) 3 

History 100 (History of World Civilization I) 3 

Math 111 (College Algebra and Trigonometry) or 110 4 

Botany 140 (General Botany) 4 

Art 220 (Graphic Presentation I) 2 

L.A. 101 (Landscape Architectural Orientation) 1 

17 

2nd Semester 

English 101 (Ideas and Their Expression II) 3 

History 101 (History of World Civilization II) 3 

Math 112 (Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors) 4 

Art 221 (Graphic Presentation II) 2 

General Chemistry 101 3 

General Chemistry I (Laboratory) 1 

16 



98 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

1st Semester 

Humanities 200 (Survey of the Humanities I) 3 

Hort. 202 (Plant Materials I) 3 

L.A. 220 (Visual Communication Workshop) 2 

Geog. 200 (Principles of Geography) 3 

Arch. Engineering 321 (Arch. Graphics I) 3 

L.A. 230 (Environmental Ecology) 3 

17 

2nd Semester 

Sociology 100 (Principles of Sociology) 3 

Humanities 201 (Survey of the Humanities II) 3 

Hort. 203 (Plant Materials II) 3 

Arch. Engineering 322 (Arch. Graphics II) 3 

Speech Comm. 250 (Speech Communication) 2 

L.A. 240 (Basic Landscape Design) 3 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

1 st Semester 

Ag. Engineering 401 (Surveying, Drainage, and Soil Conservation) ... 3 

L.A. 340 (Landscape Architectural Design I) 4 

L.A. 330 (Landscape Architectural Construction I) 4 

Soil Science 338 (Fundamentals of Soil Science) 4 

Electives _3 

18 

2nd Semester 

Geology 309 (Elements of Geology) 3 

L.A. 341 (Landscape Architectural Design II) 4 

L.A. 331 (Landscape Architectural Construction II) 4 

L.A. 310 (History of Landscape Architecture) 3 

Electives _3 

17 

SENIOR YEAR 

1 st Semester 

Economics 301 (Principles of Economics) 3 

L.A. 440 (Advanced L.A. Design I) 4 

Arch. Engineering 566 (City Planning and Urban Design) 4 

Electives 5 

16 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 99 

2nd Semester 

L.A. 441 (Advanced L.A. Design II) 4 

LA. 410 (Professional Practice) 2 

LA. 400 (Planting Design) 3 

L.A. 420 (Seminar) 2 

Electives _6 

17 

OPTIONAL ELECTIVE TRACKS: 

Students will be required to elect a minimum of 12 semester hours from one 
of the optional elective tracks. Five semester hours of free electives are pro- 
vided under the curriculum. All programs of study shall have the approval of 
the student's major advisor and the department. 

Urban/ Advocacy: 

Political Science 442 (Municipal Government) 3 (3-0) 

Political Science 643 (Urban Politics and Government) 3 (3-0) 

Business Administration 610 (Interdisciplinary Seminar In 

Urban Transportation) 3 (3-0) 

Sociology 313 (The Community) 3 (3-0) 

Sociology 505 (Seminar in Urban Studies) 3 (3-0) 

Architectural Engineering 567 (City Planning & Urban Design II) 5 (2-6) 

Regional: 

Geography 650 (Physical Geography I) 3 (3-0) 

Geography 651 (Physical Geography II) 3 (3-0) 

Earth Science 408 (Aerial Photointerpretation) 3 (1-4) 

Political Science 441 (State Government) 3 (3-0) 

Sociology 313 (The Community) 3 (3-0) 

Rural Sociology 330 (Rural Sociology, Prin's of) 3 (3-0) 

Plant Science 618 (General Forestry) 3 (2-2) 

Math 240 (Introduction to Programming Digital Computers) 3 (2-2) 

Environmental Science 625 (Earth Resources) 3 (2-2) 

Office Practice/Governmental Administration: 

Speech 251 (Public Speaking) 3 (3-0) 

Speech 636 (Persuasive Communication) 3 (3-0) 

Political Science 443 (Public Administration) 3 (3-0) 

Economics 401 (Public Finance) 3 (3-0) 

Business Administration 204 (Business Environment) 3 (3-0) 

Business Administration 305 (Principles of Management) 3 (3-0) 

Business Administration 450 (Business Communication) 3 (3-0) 

Business Administration 451 (Principles of Business Law I) 3 (3-0) 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE COURSES 

101. Landscape Architectural Orientation 1 (1-0) 

Lectures and seminars on the university and the field of Landscape Architec- 
ture. 



100 Department of Plant Science and Technology 

202. Plant Materials I 3(1-4) 

Study of plant materials as used in landscape design. Emphasis on trees, 
shrubs, ground covers, and vines, native or introduced to North Carolina. Prereq: 
Botany 140. 

203. Plant Materials II. 3(1-4) 
Continuation of Hort. 202, with different plant species. Prereq: Botany 140. 

220. Visual Communication. 2(0-4) 

Visual analysis of design elements and forms with emphasis on their func- 
tion in design; visual analysis of landscape materials, landscape architec- 
tural presentation techniques. 

230. Environmental Ecology. 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of ecology, eco-system structure and function; design-oriented 
study of the relation between natural systems and constructed systems. Field 
trips. 

240. Basic Landscape Design. 3(2-2) 

Lectures and projects which explore the design potential of the environment, 
develop processes for problem solving and presentive ideas verbally and 
visually. Design of small sites with simple variables. 

310. History of Landscape Architecture. 3(3-0) 

A study of the development of landscape architecture from antiquity to 
modern times, with emphasis on its relation to allied arts and professions. 

330. Landscape Architectural Construction I. 4(0-8) 

Lecture, exercises and projects in grading and earth volume computations, 
surface drainage techniques and construction drawings. Prereq: Admission to 
intermediate program, Math. 112 and LA. major. 

331. Landscape Architectural Construction II. 4(1-6) 

Lectures and projects on landscape structures, selection of materials, their use 
in design, and development of construction drawings. Prereq: LA. 330. 

340. Intermediate Landscape Architectural Design I. 4(0-8) 

Design problems involving private, semi-public and public area with em- 
phasis on plan analysis, detail drawing and presentation. Prereq: Admission to 
intermediate program, LA. 220 and 240. 

341. Intermediate Landscape Architectural Design II. 4(0-8) 

Continuation of LA. 340 with concentration on urban problems. Prereq: 
LA. 340. 

400. Planting Design. 3(3-0) 

Fundamentals of design as applied to the use of plant materials, with em- 
phasis on aesthetic, and functional arrangements. Problems will include prep- 
aration of planting plans, cost estimates and technical specifications. 



Department of Plant Science and Technology 101 

410. Professional Practice. 2(2-0) 

A study of the professional practice of landscape architecture, including pro- 
fessional ethics and registration laws; the preparation of proposals and con- 
tract documents; office administration; job supervision; and relationship with 
clients and contractors. Prereq: L.A. major, consent. 

420. Seminar 2(2-0) 

Individual research, group discussions, and lectures on contemporary issues 
relating to the practice of landscape architecture. Prereq: Senior L.A. major or 
consent of instructor. 

440. Advanced Landscape Design I. 4(0-8) 

In depth study of a comprehensive landscape architectural problems involv- 
ing existing situations. Research preliminary studies conferences and presen- 
tation of recommendations. Prereq: Admission to advanced program. L.A. 341. 

441. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design II. 4(0-8) 

An approved design problem requiring individual work to serve as a com- 
prehensive examination. Preparation and presentation to include a written 
and graphic analysis, detailed plans, specifications, cost estimates and model 
(or other means approved by instructor). Prereq: L.A. 440. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

601. Environmental Perception and Design Determinants. Credit 3(3-0) 

Comprehensive perception of natural forces as design determinants. An 
assissment of systems and methods of perception, classification, analysis and 
synthesis of natural forces and elements as they affect physical design and 
human use. Lecture and workshops will emphasize perception and landscape 
design. 

602. Qualitative Analysis in Landscape Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Evolution and trends of applied physical design in landscape planning. In- 
vestigation of actual hypothetical design situations; study of visual and cul- 
tural values of landscape resources in planned environments. Lectures and 
practicums of physical design, site capabilities, landscape structuring, and 
landscape values. 

603. Land-Use Planning and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods and systems of conservation, management and use of land areas. 
Lecture and field study course on land surface forming and stabilization, 
watershed use potentials and use controls, land zoning and ordinances affect- 
ing various land uses and community decisions. 

604. Factors of Physical Design. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of human behavioral responses and use patterns within physical 
environments, with emphasis on special group needs and compatability with 
landscape resource areas. Consideration of problems affecting a synthesis of 
landscape values and design forms, visual and psychological values of planned 
and unplanned environments and relationships of social functions to land- 
scape architectural forms. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Frank H. White, Dean 

The School of Arts and Sciences is concerned primarily with providing a lib- 
eral and professional education for all its students. While its orientation is 
towards the liberal arts, the school accepts its responsibility to provide instruc- 
tion in the appropriate programs in general education for all students attend- 
ing the University. The objectives of this school are: 

1. to provide courses of instruction to all students of the University in gen- 
eral or basic education; 

2. to provide formal instruction in breadth and in depth in specific curriculum 
areas; 

3. to provide experiences which seek to develop the student's ability to en- 
gage in analytical and critical thought; 

4. to provide activities which allow the student to acquire knowledge con- 
cerning the significant accomplishments in the humanities, social sciences, 
natural sciences, and mathematics; and 

5. to provide the opportunity for individual creativity and development 
through undergraduate participation in research activities and special 
problems. 

To accomplish these goals, learning experiences are provided in courses of 
study which require each student to experience a wide range of general educa- 
tion subjects. Learning experiences also are structured to allow the student to 
gain in-depth experiences in a specific discipline through major sequences. The 
school, therefore, offers degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts or the 
Bachelor of Science in Art, Biology, Chemistry, English, French, History, Mathe- 
matics, Music, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, Social 
Service, Sociology and Speech and Dramatic Arts. Many degree programs may 
be pursued jointly with Professional Education courses (offered in the School of 
Education). Graduates of these programs qualify for certification to teach in 
the secondary schools. In addition, the Physics and Mathematics Departments 
have joint degree programs with the School of Engineering in Engineering 
Physics and Engineering Mathematics. 

Requirements for achievement of a baccalaureate degree are completion of a 
minimum of 124 semester credit hours in one of the departments and the 
achievement of a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on a four point scale. To 
assist students in meeting these requirements in a four year period of time for 
full time students, a system of student advisement is provided in all departments. 
Academic advising is essential for assuring the students that the programs of 
study they are pursuing include the requirements of their particular depart- 
ments and desired degree. It assists also in helping students make maximum use 
of the learning opportunities in the University and in helping those students 
with academic problems to work out solutions to their difficulties. 

To this end, and the importance placed on academic excellence, the students 
enrolled in the School of Arts and Sciences are permitted to register for no more 
than eighteen semester hours credit in one semester without the approval of 
the department chairperson and the Dean. The recommended program of study 
is sixteen hours for students. Academic excellence is stimulated also by en- 
couraging membership in honorary societies appropriate to subject matter 
areas and in promoting activities for the recognition of academic achievement. 



106 School of Arts and Sciences 

The School of Arts and Sciences places high importance on its role as a pro- 
vider of a depository of knowledge for the University. In keeping with this 
role, it fosters special library collections, operates the University Art Gallery, 
sponsors the Center for African and Afro American Studies and sponsors experi- 
ences in the performing arts for students whose talents may be developed and 
displayed through such activities. 

While the classroom serves as an important location for learning, activities to 
stimulate and promote constructive intellectual and social maturity are con- 
ducted in the laboratory, the seminar, the internship, field instruction and the 
conference. 

Admission requirements for the School of Arts and Sciences are the same 
as those for the University. Requirements for graduation vary from depart- 
ment to department, so students must be certain to satisfy departmental re- 
quirements. 

For the students enrolled in this school, effort is made to afford them op- 
tions and flexibility in educational planning. To achieve this, the school has 
developed a set of general education requirements from which the student 
may choose sixteen (16) courses in five fields to complete these requirements. 
General education requirements are usually completed in the first two years 
in the University. 

The courses and fields from which they may be selected are listed below: 

I. English Composition 2 courses required 

II. Science (natural and physical) 4 courses required 

Chemistry, Biology, 
Mathematics, Physics, Botany, 
Zoology and Earth Science 

III. Foreign Language 2 courses required 
Spanish, French, German, 

Russian, Computer Programming 

IV. Science (Social & Behavioral) 4 courses required 
Anthropology, Economics, 

Geography, History, Political 
Science and Sociology 

V. Humanities 4 courses required 

Art, English, Humanities, 
Music, Philosophy and Speech 

Certain courses required specific prerequisites, therefore, each student 
should select courses with this fact in mind. 

Certain majors require specific courses, so each student must be knowledge- 
able about departmental requirements in selecting these courses. 

Students planning to enter teaching fields should be knowledgeable of the 
semester hour requirements. 

Students should be aware also that satisfactory advanced placement scores 
and/ or comparable experential evidence may be used to satisfy an aspect of 
these requirements. 



School of Arts and Sciences 107 

COURSE SELECTION LIST— GENERAL EDUCATION 
REQUIREMENTS 



(Sixteen courses may be selected from among the following fields within the 
limits specified) 

I. English (2 courses-required) 

English 100, Freshman Composition 
English 101, Freshman Composition 

II. Sciences (Physical, Biological, Mathematical) (4 courses) 
Chemistry 100, Physical Science 
Chemistry 101, General Chemistry I 
Chemistry 102, General Chemistry II 
Biology 100, Biological Science 
otany 140, General Botany 
Mathematics 101, Freshman Mathematics I 
Mathematics 102, Freshman Mathematics II 
Mathematics 111, College Algebra — Trigonometry 
Mathematics 113, Analytical Geometry & Calculus 
Physics 200, Introduction to Physics 
Physics 201, Survey of Physics 
Physics 221, General Physics I' 
Physics 222, General Physics II 
Physics 225, College Physics I 
Physics 226, College Physics II 
Physics 250, Introduction to Astronomy 
Zoology 160, General Zoology 
Earth Science 309, Elements of Physical Geology 
Earth Science 330, Elements of weather and climate 
Earth Science 201, The Earth Man's Environment 

III. Foreign Languages (2 courses) 
French 100, Elementary French 
French 101, Elementary French 
French 300, Intermediate French 
French 301, Intermediate French 
Spanish 104, Elementary Spanish 
Spanish 105, Elementary Spanish 
Spanish 320, Intermediate Spanish 
Spanish 321, Intermediate Spanish 

IV. Sciences (Social and Behavioral) (4 courses) 
Anthropology 200, Introduction to Anthropology 
Economics 301, Principles of Economics I 
Economics 302, Principles of Economics II 
Geography 200, Principles of Geography 
Geography 210, World Regional 

History 100, History of World Civilization 

History 101, History of World Civilization 

Political Science 200, American Government andPolitics 

Political Science 210, State and Local Government 

Sociology 100, Principles of Sociology 



108 Department of Art 

V. The Humanities (4 courses) 

Art 100, Basic Drawing & Composition 

Art 101, Lettering and Poster Design 

Art 220, Graphic Presentation I 

Art 221, Graphic Presentation II 

English 220, English Literature I 

English 221, English Literature II 

English 430, American Literature I 

English 431, American Literature II 

Humanities 200, Survey of Humanities I 

Humanities 201, Survey of Humanities II 

Music 404, History & Application of Music 

Music 405, Music of the Baroque & Romantic Periods 

Music 406, Romantic Music 

Philosophy 260, Introduction to Philosophy 

Philosophy 261, History of Philosophy 

Philosophy 262, Logic 

Speech 250, Speech Fundamentals 

Speech 251, Public Speaking 

Speech 252, Argumentation — Debate 

Speech 253, Parliamentary Procedure 

Dependent upon career choices students in the School of Arts and Sciences 
should select combination of courses during the first two years as suggested 
by the samples below. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Area Number of Courses 
English 2 

Mathematics 2 

Physical or Biological Science 2 

Social Science 2 

Physical Education 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Foreign Languages or Computer Languages 2 

Humanities 4 

Social Sciences 2 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Jr., Chairman 

The objectives of the Art Department are to guide the student through class- 
room, studio, and working experiences; to develop his aesthetic perceptivity, 
technical competency; and to broaden his general education. 

Beginning with the belief that human beings are creative; that this creative 
impulse can serve human needs, and an art curriculum can motivate and 
nourish the development of creative ability, the art curricula seek to embrace 



Department of Art 



109 



and utilize both functional and experimental approaches in the development 
of that creative ability. This philosophy is reflected in three areas of concen- 
tration — Art Education, Design, and painting. 

The four-year programs leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Art 
integrate studio major and academic courses. The fundamentals of art coupled 
with courses outside the area of art enrich and broaden the comprehension 
of creative experience and lay a foundation for the pursuit of graduate study, 
for careers as creative artists, or teachers. 

In the advanced studio courses, students may expect to purchase certain 
materials which are not supplied by the Art Department. These materials may 
cost from $5.00 to $45.00 depending on the course taken by the student. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR ART MAJORS 



DESIGN OPTION 
Major Content Courses 



Course Number 


Credit Hours 


■ Course Title 


ART 100 


3 


Basic Drawing and Composition 


ART 101 


3 


Lettering and Poster Design 


ART 222 


3 


Watercolor 


ART 224* 


2 


Art Appreciation 


ART 225* 


2 


An Introduction to the History of Art 


ART 226 


3 


Design I 


ART 227 


3 


Design II 


ART 228 


3 


Color Theory 


ART 229 


3 


Anatomy and Figure Drawing 


ART 400* 


2 


Renaissance Art 


ART 401 


3 


Ceramics 


ART 402 


3 


Basic Sculpture 


ART 405 


3 


Materials and Techniques 


ART 406 


3 


Painting Techniques 


ART 455 


3 


Fabric Design and Basic Weaving 


ART 456 


3 


Fabric Painting and Weaving 


ART 459* 


2 


Baroque and Rococo Art 


ART 520* 


2 


Modern Art 


ART 524 


3 


Introduction to Graphic Arts 


ART 525 


3 


Lithography and Serigraphy 


ART 526 


3 


Senior Project 



Other Requirements 

Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 101 3 
French or German 6 
Electives 12 



Engineering Graphics 



'Indicates art courses which can satisfy general education requirements. 



110 



Department of Art 



PAINTING OPTION 

SAME AS DESIGN EXCEPT ART 528 and 529 ARE SUBSTITUTED FOR 
ART 455 and 456. 

TEACHING OPTION 

Major Content Courses 





Credit Hours 


i Course Title 


ART 100 


3 


Basic Drawing and Composition 


ART 101 


3 


Lettering and Poster Design 


ART 224 


2 


Art Appreciation 


ART 225 


2 


An Introduction to the History of Art 


ART 226 


3 


Design I 


ART 227 


3 


Design II 


ART 229 


3 


Anatomy and Figure Drawing 


ART 400 


2 


Renaissance Art 


ART 401 


3 


Ceramics 


ART 405 


3 


Materials and Techniques 


ART 454 


3 


General Crafts 


ART 459 


2 


Baroque and Rococo Art 


ART 520 


2 


Modern Art 


ART 524 


3 


Introduction to Graphic Arts 


ART 600 


3 


Public School Art 



Other Requirements — French or German — 6 Electives — 

Satisfactory completion of general requirements specified for certification 

DESIGN OPTION 
Freshman Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art. 100 3 

Art. 224 2 

English 100 3 

Math 101 3 

Behavior Sciences 

(Elective) 3 

Personal Hygiene 200 _2 

16 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Art. 101 3 

Art. 225 2 

English 101 3 

Math 102 3 

Behavior Science 

(Elective) _3 

14 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



S.H. 

Art 226 3 

Biological Science 4 

Electives 2 

Humanities (Elective) 3 

Behavior Science 

(Elective) 3 

Humanities (Elective) _3 

18 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 

Art 222 3 

Art 227 3 

Art 229 3 

Humanities (Elective) 3 

Engineering Graphics 101 3 

Physical Science 100 3 

Physical Science Lab 110 _1 

19 



Department of Art 



111 



Junior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art 400 2 

Art 401 3 

Art 459 2 

Foreign Language 

(French or German) 3 

Behavior Science (Elective) 3 

Electives _3 

16 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Art 228 3 

Art 402 3 

Foreign Language 

(French or German) 3 

Humanitites (Elective) 3 

Electives _3 

15 



Senior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art 520 2 

Art 524 3 

Art 405 3 

Art 406 3 

Art 455 _3 

15 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Art 525 3 

Art 526 3 

Art 456 3 

Electives _3 

12 



Natural Sciences: 4 courses from Physical, Biological, Mathematical. 
Behavior Science: 4 courses; 12 Semester hours. 
Humanities: 4 courses; 12 semester hours 



PAINTING OPTION 

The Same as Design Option except Art 528 and 529 are substituted for Art 
455 and 456. 



TEACHING OPTION 



Freshman Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art 100 3 

Education 100 1 

English 100 3 

History 100 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives _2 

16 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Art 101 3 

English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

Personal Hygiene 200 2 

Electives _3 

17 



112 



Department of Art 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



S.H. 

Art 224 2 

Art 226 3 

Education 300 2 

Foreign Language 

(French or German) 3 

Humanities 200 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Physical Education _J^ 

17 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 

Art 225 2 

Art 227 3 

Education 301 2 

Foreign Language 

(German or French) 3 

Humanities 201 3 

Electives _3 

16 



Junior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art 400 2 

Art 405 3 

Physical Science 100 3 

Physical Science Lab 110 1 

Art 600 3 

Electives _3 

15 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Art 229 3 

Art 401 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Education 400 3 

Speech 250 _2 

15 



Senior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Art 454 3 

Art 459 2 

Art 520 2 

Art 524 3 

Education 436 3 

Electives _3 

16 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

Education 500 3 

Education 525 3 

Education 560 6 

Education 637 _3 

15 



COURSES IN ART 

Undergraduate 

100. Basic Drawing and Composition. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3200) 
A study of the fundamental principles of drawing as a mode of visual ex- 
pression. Selected problems involving basic consideration of line, form, space 
and composition are presented for analysis and laboratory practice. 



Department of Art 1 13 

101. Lettering and Poster Design. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3201) 

A comprehensive study of the art of lettering. Projects involving the prin- 
ciples of layout, poster construction, and general advertising. 

220. Graphic Presentation I. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 3220) 

Exercises in various sketching techniques and media, including work with 
pencil, charcoal, crayon, and ink. Individual instruction is given using forms 
in nature and still life for art and architectural presentation. Prerequisite: 
Sophomore Classification. 

221. Graphic Presentation II. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 3221) 

The theory of color mixture. Individual instruction in the techniques of 
watercolor painting for architectural presentation. Studies from nature and 
still-life. Prerequisite: Art 220. 

222. Watercolor. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3222) 

Experimental exploration of all aqueous media: watercolor, casein, gouache 
their possibilities and limitations. 

224. Art Appreciation. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3224) 

An introduction to the study of art. Basic qualities of various forms of 
artistic expression are explained. Emphasis is placed on the application of art 
principles in every day life. 

225. An Introduction to the History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3225) 

A general introduction to the history of art, beginning with an examination 
of ancient art in terms of their extant monuments and culminating with the 
analysis and comparison of representative works of today. 

226. Design I. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3226) 
An introduction to visual design based upon an analysis of the aims, ele- 
ments, principles, sources of design and their application in a variety of media. 

227. Design II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3227) 

A continuation of Art 226 with consideration given to three dimensional 
as well as two dimensional problems. Students are encouraged in the ex- 
perimental use of materials and are required to find individual and complete 
solutions to problems through various stages of research, planning, and 
presentation. Emphasis is placed on technical perfection and the develop- 
ment of professional attitudes. 



114 Department of Art 

228. Color Theory. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3228) 

Problems directed toward understanding of color through creative experi- 
ment and application of color in visual organization. Use of slides, filmstrips, 
and trips. 

229. Anatomy and Figure Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3229) 

A study of the human figure with emphasis on anatomy, body structure and 
proportions, draped figures at rest and in action. Special emphasis is given to 
detailed studies, composition, and stylization. 

400. Renaissance Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3240) 

The study of the Renaissance in Italy and in major regions of northern and 
western Europe from 1300 to 1600. 

401. Ceramics. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3241) 

Introduction to basic techniques and processes of making ceramics. The 
student is taught hand building, slip casting, one piece molds, wheel throw- 
ing, decorating, glazing, and firing. Supplementary reading is required. 

402. Basic Sculpture. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3242) 

Introduction to sculptural form with the use of clay modeling, basic plaster 
techniques, wood, and metal in relation to the production of sculpture. 

403. Jewelry and Metalwork. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3243) 

The design and technical essentials of jewelry making and metalwork. 
Prerequisites: Art 226, 227. 

405. Materials and Techniques. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3245) 

A study of the materials of the artist; supports, grounds, vehicles, binders, 
and protective covering. Exploration of the possibilities of various techniques 
of picture construction as a point of departure for individual expression. 

406. Painting Techniques. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3246) 

A continuation of 405 with further work in projects that explore the esthetic 
opportunities and problems implicit in the use of varying media. Work in 
tempera, gouache, casein, polymers and lacquers. 

450. Advertising Design I. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly 3250) 
The study of basic tools of advertising design. Students are introduced to 
lettering techniques, layout problems, and reproduction processes for adver- 
tising, illustrations, posters, and television. 



Department of Art 115 

451. Advertising Design II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3251) 

Preparation and rendering of art work for reproduction from rough idea 
layouts to finished illustration. Creative and technical class work is augmented 
by visits to commercial studios and printing companies. Prerequisite: Art 
450. 

452. Commercial Art. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3252) 

Illustration techniques. Different materials and renderings employed in 
advertising illustration, such as airbrush, colored inks, scratch board, etc. 
Attention is given to techniques of printing in as far as they effect graphic 
design. 

453. Typography. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3253) 

The study of typography in relation to lettering, advertising, and design. 
Prerequisites: Art 101 and 450. 

454. General Crafts. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3254) 

Introduction to craft processes, weaving, metalwork, leather, etc. 

455. Fabric Design and Basic Weaving. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3255) 

Basic principles of design as related to textiles and other flat surface decora- 
tion. The warping, threading, and weaving on small looms. History of fabric 
design and weaving. Prerequisites: Art 226, 227. 

456. Fabric Painting and Weaving. Credit 3(0-6) 
The emphasis is on printing techniques and designers' tools to achieve 

effective results and on the use of the large looms for creating interesting 
fabrics. Study of contemporary trends in weaving. Prerequisites: Art 226, 227, 
455. 

457. Stage Design and Marionette Production I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3257) 

Problems in scene design and stage settings with experiments in stage 
lighting. Attention is given to the designing and construction of marionettes 
for simple plays. Field trips and attendance at plays are required. 

458. Stage Design and Marionette Production II. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of 457. 

459. Baroque and Rococo Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3259) 

The study of art in Europe from 1600 to 1800. 



116 Department of Art 

520. Modern Art. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Art 3260) 
European and American Art from about 1875 to the present. 

524. Introduction to Graphic Arts. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3264) 

Introduction to printmaking processes. Production of prints in varied media: 
linoleum, woodcuts, drypoint, etchings, serigraphs, and lithographs. 

525. Lithography and Serigraphy. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3265) 

Exploration of the techniques of lithography and serigraphy as a means of 
contemporary artistic expression. Emphasis of medium determined by in- 
dividual interest. 

526. Senior Project. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3266) 

Students who have given evidence of their ability to do serious individual 
work on a professional level may plan and carry out a project of their own 
choosing, subject to approval and supervision of a faculty member. 

528. Painting I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3268) 

Creative painting in various media with emphasis on a modern approach 
and handling of medium. Research and experience in contemporary trends: 
abstracts, non-objective, and abstract expressionism. 

529. Painting II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3269) 

Development of the student as a professional artist; advance research and 
familiarization with contemporary trends, concepts, forms, and symbols. 
Emphasis on an original contemporary statement. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Public School Art. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3270) 
Study of materials, methods, and procedures in teaching art in public 
schools. Special emphasis is placed on selection and organization of materials, 
seasonal projects, lesson plan. 

602. Seminar In Art History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Art 3272) 

Investigation in depth of the background influences which condition 
stylistic changes in art forms by analyzing and interpreting works of representa- 
tive personalities. 

603. Studio Techniques. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3273) 

Demonstrations that illustrate and emphasize the technical potentials of 
varied media. These techniques are analyzed and discussed as a point of 
departure for individual expression. 



Department of Biology 1 1 V 

604. Ceramic Workshop. Credit 2(0-2) 
(Formerly Art 3274) 

Advanced studio problems and projects in ceramics with emphasis on 
independent creative work. The student is given opportunity for original 
research and is encouraged to work toward the development of a personal 
style in the perfection of technique. 

605. Printmaking. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3275) 

Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking. 
Advanced studio problems in woodcut etching, lithography, and serigraphy. 

606. Sculpture. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3276) 

Further study of sculpture with an expansion of techniques. Individual 
problems for advanced students. 

607. Project Seminar. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3277) 

Advanced specialized studies in creative painting, design, and sculpture. By 
means of discussion and suggestions, this seminar intends to solve various 
problems which might arise in each work. Prerequisite: Consent of the instruc- 
tor. 

608. Arts and Crafts. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 3278) 

Creative experimentation with a variety of materials, tools, and processes: 
projects in wood, metal, jewelry making, wood and metal construction, fabric 
design, leather craft, puppet making, and paper sculpture. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Arthur J. Hicks, Chairman 

The program of the Biology Department is designed to serve the needs of 
the University as a whole in the area of biological sciences. The undergraduate 
courses of instruction are organized to provide training necessary for speciali- 
zation in agricultural sciences, home economics, nursing, horticulture, and the 
teaching of Biology. The Department offers courses designed to meet the gen- 
eral education requirement of the university and a professional program for 
entrance into graduate, medical, dental and veterinary schools. A Master of 
Science degree in Education with concentration in Biology is also offered by 
the Biology Department. 

A student may earn the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology by pursuing 
either of the two curricula offered by the department. The professional major 
is designed to meet the needs of students planning a vocation in industry, 
dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, or further graduate studies. The 
teaching major is designed for Biology majors who desire to meet the require- 
ments for certification as secondary school teachers in North Carolina. 

The curricula of the two programs are similarly structured in the freshman 
and sophomore years. The course requirements of the upper level of these 
programs vary in that each is geared toward its specific goal. 



118 Department of Biology 

Professional Major — In the Professional Major, the student is required to 
complete a minimum of 38 semester hours of Biology. There is also a further 
requirement of 45 semester hours of supporting courses. The program requires 
a minimum of 124 semester hours for graduation. 

Teaching Major — In the Teaching Major, students are required to complete 
a minimum of 35 semester hours in Biology. Required supporting courses in 
this curriculum are 66 semester hours. This program requires a minimum of 
124 semester hours for graduation. 



REQUIRED COURSES for BIOLOGY MAJORS 
1. REQUIRED COURSES IN BIOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL MAJORS 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Course Title 


Biol. 140 


4 


General Botany 


Biol. 160 


4 


General Zoology 


Biol. 121 


4 


General Microbiology 


Biol. 260 


4 


Comparative Evolution of the 
Vertebrates 


Biol. 465, or 


4 


Histology 


Biol. 664 


3 


Histo-Chemical Technique 


Biol. 466 


3 


Principles of Genetics 


Biol. 561 


4 


Vertebrate Embryology 


Biol. 562 


4 


Introductory Cell Physiology 


Biol. 568 


1 


Seminar in Biology 


Biol. 569 


1 


Seminar in Biology 



SIX CREDIT HOURS TO BE SELECTED FROM THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Course Title 


Biol. 261 


3 


Socio-Biology 


Biol. 467 


3 


General Entomology 


Biol. 600 


3 


General Science for Elementary 
Teachers 


Biol. 640 


3 


Plant Biology 


Biol. 642 


3 


Special Problems in Botany 


Biol. 660 


3 


Special Problems in Zoology 


Biol. 661 


3 


Mammalian Biology 


Biol. 662 


3 


Biology of Sex 


Biol. 663 


3 


Cytology 


Biol. 665 


3 


Nature Study 


Biol. 666 


3 


Experimental Embryology 


Biol. 667 


3 


Animal Biology 


Biol. 668 


3 


Animal Behavior 


Biol. 669 


3 


Recent Advances in Cell Biology 



Department of Biology 



119 



2. REQUIRED COURSES IN BIOLOGY FOR TEACHING MAJORS 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Course Title 


Biol. 140 


4 


General Botany 


Biol. 160 


4 


General Zoology 


Biol. 121 


4 


General Microbiology 


Biol. 260 


4 


Comparative Evolution of 
the Vertebrates 


Biol. 400 


3 


Field Biology 


Biol. 466 


3 


Principles of Genetics 


Biol. 561 


4 


Vertebrate Embryology 


Biol. 562 


4 


Introductory Cell Physiology 


Biol. 568 


1 


Seminar in Biology 



THREE CREDIT HOURS TO BE SELECTED FROM THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 



Course No. 
Biol. 261 
Biol. 467 
Biol. 600 

Biol. 640 
Biol. 642 
Biol. 660 
Biol. 661 
Biol. 662 
Biol. 663 
Biol. 665 
Biol. 666 
Biol. 667 
Biol. 668 
Biol. 669 



Credit Hours Course Title 



3 


Socio-Biology 


3 


General Entomology 


3 


General Science for 




Elementary Teachers 


3 


Plant Biology 


3 


Special Problems in Botany 


3 


Special Problems in Zoology 


3 


Mammalian Biology 


3 


Biology of Sex 


3 


Cytology 


3 


Nature Study 


3 


Experimental Embryology 


3 


Animal Biology 


3 


Animal Behavior 


3 


Recent Advances in Cell Biology 



3. REQUIRED SUPPORTING COURSES FOR PROFESSIONAL MAJORS 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Course Title 


Chem. 106-116 


5 


General Chemistry I 


Chem. 107-117 


5 


General Chemistry II 


Chem. 221-223 


5 


Organic Chemistry I 


Chem. 222-224 


5 


Organic Chemistry II 


Phy. 225-235 


4 


College Physics I 


Phy. 226-236 


4 


College Physics II 


Math. Ill 


4 


College Algebra and Trigonometry 


Math. 113 


4 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 


Fr 100 or Gr 102 


3 


Elem. French I or Elem. German I 


Fr 101 or Gr 103 


3 


Elem. French II or Elem. German II 


Psy 320 


3 


General Psychology 



120 



Department of Biology 



4. REQUIRED SUPPORTING COURSES FOR TEACHING MAJORS 



Course No. 
Chem. 106-116 
Chem. 107-117 
Chem. 221-223 
Phy. 235-225 
Phy. 226-236 
Math. Ill 
Math. 113 
Fr 100, Gr 102, 

or Sp 104 
Fr 101, Gr 103, 

or Sp 105 
H. Ed 200 
Eng. 250 
Psy 320 
Ed 300 
Ed 301 
Ed 400 
Psy 436 
Ed 500 
Ed 535 
Ed 560 



Credit Hours 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 



Course Title 
General Chemistry I 
General Chemistry II 
Organic Chemistry I 
College Physics I 
College Physics II 
College Algebra and Trigonometry 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus 
Elem. French I, Elem. German I, or 

Elem. Spanish I 
Elem. French II, Elem. German II or 

Elem. Spanish II 
Personal Hygiene 
Speech Fundamentals 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Education 
Phil, and Soc. Found, of Education 
Psy. Found, of Education 
Tests and Measurements 
Prin. and Curricula of Sec. Schools 
Methods of Teaching Science 
Observation and Student Teaching 



COURSES IN BIOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

100. Biological Science.* Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly Biol. Sc. 1501) 
This is a general education course that stresses the objectives presented un- 
der the general education program of the School of Education and General 
Studies. It is structured to meet the needs of students who plan to teach (a) 
at the pre-school level, (b) at the elementary school level, (c) at the secondary 
level in a non-science mathematics area, and (d) in the area of music. In addi- 
tion this course is designed for freshmen who plan to concentrate in the divi- 
sions of the Humanities or the Social Sciences. 

400. Field Biology. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Biol. 1540) 
This course is designed to give a more detailed understanding of the ecologi- 
cal requirements of organisms, their distribution and their way of life. Em- 
phasis is placed on the method of collecting, classification, and preserving 
samples of organisms, where and when to find them and the sources of perti- 
nent information regarding them. 



"General Education course for non-majors. 



Department of Biology 121 

COURSES IN BACTERIOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

120. Microbiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1523) 

A survey of the principles and techniques of microbiology and immunology 
with special emphasis on their application to nursing. 

121. General Microbiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Gen. Bact. 1524) 

A general course designed to orient the student within the world of micro- 
scopic living things, including yeasts, molds, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses. 
Detailed study is given to bacteria as prototypes of all microorganisms. Rela- 
tionships among microorganisms and selected microorganisms (higher plants, 
animals, man) are emphasized. Prerequisites: Biology 160, 140; Chemistry 106- 
116 and 107-117. 

420. Dairy Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1543) 

A general course which considers some of the common organisms asso- 
ciated with normal, and abnormal fermentations of milk; the role of micro- 
organisms in the production and decomposition of various dairy products is 
also considered. Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

421. Soil Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1544) 

The role of microorganisms in soil fertility. Special emphasis is on the 
activity of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria and also those concerned in the decom- 
position of organic waste materials. Prerequisite: Biology 121. 



COURSES IN BOTANY 

Undergraduate 

140. General Botany.* Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1507) 
Plants as living organisms constituting an integrated part of man's environ- 
ment. Emphasis is placed on cellular function, plant structure and function, 
evolutionary tendencies, and living processes. 

430. Plant Taxonomy. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1527) 

Systematic botany, and taxonomic system, botanical nomenclature, and 
herbarium techniques are combined in this study of selected orders, families, 
and genera of seed plants. Prerequisite: Botany 140. 



*General Education course for majors. 



122 Department of Biology 

432. Plant Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1528) 

An elementary course designed to develop a clear understanding of the 
basic physiological process related to the structure, growth, and function of 
the seed plants. Prerequisites: Biology 140, Chemistry 106 and 107. 

530. Plant Pathology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1547) 
Basic factors governing the development of plant diseases including host- 
parasite relationships, effect of environment on disease development and the 
nature of disease resistance. Prerequisite: Botany 140. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

640. Plant Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1572) 
A presentation of fundamental botancial concepts to broaden the back- 
ground of high school biology teachers. Bacteria, fungi, and other microscopic 
plants will be considered as well as certain higher forms of plants. The course 
will consist of lectures, laboratory projects, and field trips. 

642. Special Problems in Botany. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1573) 
Open to advanced students in botany for investigation of specific problems. 
Prerequisite: Biology 140 or 640. 

COURSE IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

600. General Science for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Gen. Sci. 1570) 
This course will consider some of the fundamental principles of the life and 
physical sciences in an integrated manner in the light of present society 
needs. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

160. General Zoology.* Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1512) 
An introduction to the study of invertebrates and vertebrates with em- 
phasis on cellular physiology and the morphology, and physiology of repre- 
sentative forms. 

260. Comparative Evolution of the Vertebrates. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1531) 
A comparative study of chordate organ systems with rather detailed em- 
phasis on the evolution and organogenesis of primitive chordates, dogfish shark 
and the cat. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 



*General Education course for majors. 



Department of Biology 123 

261. Sociobiology Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory interdisciplinary course treating with the social behavior 
in non-human animals. Concentration will be made on the evolution of social 
behavior with especial emphasis on the formation, maintenance, and disrup- 
tion of social bonds. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Animal Biology. 

460. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1532) 

Comprehensive consideration of the morphology, function, phylogeny, 
classification and the life histories of representative forms of lower and higher 
invertebrate groups exclusive of insects. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

461. Human Anatomy and Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1533) 

A study of general structure and function of the human body. Not open to 
Biology majors. 

465. Histology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1551) 

The microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues and organs with special emphasis 
on histogenesis, histochemistry and histophysiology. Prerequisite: Biology 
160. 

466. Principles of Genetics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1552) 

Chromosomal mechanisms and the molecular basis of heredity; concept of 
template surfaces and the replication and genetic organization of DNA. Gene 
action at the molecular level; gene structure and function; the genetic code; 
regulation of protein synthesis; cell differentiation and development. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 160. 

467. General Entomology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1553) 

Elementary structure, description, and habits of the principal orders of in- 
sects. Laboratory work will consist of collecting, mounting, preserving, and 
classification of principal insect representatives. Recommended for general 
science and biological science majors. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

468. Economic Entomology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1554) 

Elementary structure, life histories, classification, and control of insect 
pests and related arthropods. Recommended for students majoring in one of 
the agricultural sciences. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

469. Human Anatomy. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1556) 

Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory study emphasizing basic facts 
and principles of body structure. Not open to Biology majors. 



124 Department of Biology 

560. Human Physiology. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly Zool. 1565) 

An introductory course with emphasis placed on basic principles and mech- 
anisms of physiological functioning of body cells, tissues and systems. Re- 
quired of majors in Physical Education. Not open to Biology majors. Prere- 
quisite: Biology 469. 

561. Vertebrate Embryology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1566) 

Study of the developmental stages of selected vertebrates. The materials 
are treated comparatively and consist of amphibian, bird, rodent, and refer- 
ences to other mammalian forms. Prerequisite: Biology 260. 

562. Introductory Cell Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1567) 

A treatment at the molecular level of the fundamental processes in living 
cells. The biochemistry of cellular constituents, bioenergetics, intermediary 
metabolism, and the regulatory mechanisms of the cell will be discussed. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 

568. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1568) 

A seminar on selected topic and recent advances in the field of plant and 
animal biology. This course is required of all seniors. 

569. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1569) 

A continuation of Zoology 568. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

660. Special Problems in Zoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1574) 

Open to students qualified to do research in Zoology. 

661. Mammalian Biology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1575) 

Study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation 
of representative mammals. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

662. Biology of Sex. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1576) 

Lectures on the origin and development of the germ cells and reproductive 
systems in selected animal forms. Prerequisites: Biology 140, 160, and 260. 

663. Cytology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1577) 
Study of the cell with lectures and periodic student reports on modern ad- 
vances in cellular biology. Prerequisites: Biology 140, 160 and 465. 



Department of Biology 125 

664. Histo-Chemical Technique. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1578) 

Designed to develop skills in the preparation of cells, tissues and organs for 
microscopic observation and study. Prerequisites: Biology 160 and 260. 

665. Nature Study. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1579) 

A study of diversified organisms, their habits, life histories, defenses, sex 
relationships, periodic activities and economic values designed to acquaint 
the student with fundamental knowledge that should lead to a fuller apprecia- 
tion of nature. 

666. Experimental Embryology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1580) 

A comprehensive lecture-seminar course covering the more recent litera- 
ture on experimental embryology and development physiology. Experimental 
studies treating with fish, amphibian, chick and rodent development are 
designed as laboratory projects. Prerequisite: Biology 561 or equivalent. 

667. Animal Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1581) 

A lecture-laboratory course stressing fundamental concepts and principles 
of biology with the aim of strengthening the background of high school 
teachers. Emphasis is placed on the principles of animal origin, structure, 
function, development, and ecological relationships. 

668. Animal Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the qualitative and quantitative difference between behavioral 

characteristics at different evolutionary levels, adaptiveness of differences in 
behavior and the development of behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisites: 
Biology 260, 466 and 561. 

669. Recent Advances in Cell Biology Credit 3(3-0) 
A course designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduate and 

graduate students desirous of the more recent trends concerning functions 
of organized cellular and sub-cellular systems. Current research as it relates 
to the molecular and fine structure basis of cell function, replication, and 
differentiation will be discussed. Prerequisites: Biology 466, 562, credit or 
concurrent registration in Chemistry 224. 



GRADUATE COURSES IN BOTANY 

740. Essentials of Plant Anatomy. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Botany 1585) 

741. Applied Plant Ecology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Botany 1586) 

742. Physiology of Vascular Plants. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Botany 1587) 

743. Developmental Plant Morphology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Botany 5586) 



126 



Department of Biology 



744. Plant Nutrition. 

(Formerly Botany 5587) 



Credit 3(2-2) 



GRADUATE COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

760. Projects in Biology. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 1588) 

761. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 1589) 

762. Applied Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1590) 

763. Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1591). 

764. Basic Protozoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1592) 

765. Introductory Experimental Zoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1593) 

766. Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and Secondary 

School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Zoology 1594) 

767. Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary School 

Teacher. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1595) 

768. Functional Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1596) 

769. Cellular Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 1598) 

860. Parasitology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 5585) 

861. Advanced Genetics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 5588) 

862. Research in Botany. 3 Credit Hours 
(Formerly Zoology 5592) or 

863. Research in Zoology. 3 Credit Hours 

(Formerly Zoology 5593) 



GRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGY 



703. Experimental Methods in Biology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1597) 



Credit 3(1-4) 



Department of Chemistry 127 

704. Seminar in Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Zoology 1599) 

700. Environmental Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1589) 

701. Biological Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 1590) 

702. Biological Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 1591) 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

William B. DeLauder, Chairman 
The objectives of the Department of Chemistry are: 

1. to prepare chemistry majors for graduate study in chemistry or other 
chemistry-based sciences. 

2. to prepare majors for admittance to medical, dental, and other profes- 
sional schools. 

3. to prepare majors for careers as professional chemists in industry or 
government. 

4. to prepare majors to teach chemistry at the secondary school level. 

5. to provide majors in other departments with a functional understanding 
of chemistry commensurate with the needs of the chosen field. 

6. to provide all students served by the department with insight into the 
nature of scientific investigations. 

The Department of Chemistry offers two major curricula leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree — Professional Major — Teaching Major. The cur- 
riculum of the professional major is designed to meet the needs of students 
planning to begin professional careers in chemistry upon graduation, to en- 
gage in further study in the field at the graduate level, or planning to enter 
medical, dental, or other professional schools. The student may select one or 
two options in order to complete this major. The options are: The American 
Chemical Society (ACS) Certified Program or the Pre-Health Program. The 
ACS program requires that the student complete 43 semester hours in basic 
chemistry courses and four to eight semester hours in advanced chemistry 
courses. The Pre-Health program requires the student to complete 37 semester 
hours in basic chemistry courses and 16 semester hours of basic biology 
courses. The teaching major is designed to give the student a thorough founda- 
tion in chemistry while meeting the requirements for certification as a teacher 
at the secondary school level. It requires a minimum of 37 semester hours 
credit in chemistry. This curriculum differs from the customary teaching major 
in that it provides sufficient training for a professional career in chemistry or 
in teaching at the secondary school level. One who follows this curriculum 
could subsequently do work at the graduate school level in chemistry. 



128 Department of Chemistry 

It is intended that the two curricula would be identical in the freshman 
and sophomore years so that a student need not reach a final decision regard- 
ing his choice of a profession until the beginning of the third year. The pro- 
fessional curriculum has been accredited by the American Chemical Society. 

The department offers a combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Science 
degree program. This curricula is identical in the first two years to the pro- 
fessional major's program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. It is 
designed to enable talented undergraduate students to obtain the B.S. and 
M.S. degrees, in Chemistry, during a five year period of study and research. 
Any student, who is a rising junior in chemistry, with a grade-point average of 
3.0 in chemistry and an overall average of 2.7 will be eligible for this pro- 
gram. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS 



I. Chemistry (Professional) 

A. American Chemical Society Certified Program 

1. Required Courses in Chemistry 

Chemistry 106, 107, 108, 116, 117, 221, 222, 223, 224, 231, 232, 431, 
432, 441, 442, 443, 444, 511, 545, and two advanced chemistry 
courses selected from 

Chemistry 610, 611, 621, 624, 631, 641, 643, 651, and either 503 or 
504. 

2. Required Supporting Courses 

Math. 116, 117, 300; Physics 221, 222, 231, 232; German 102, Ger- 
man 103 or Russian 106 and Russian 107; Zoology 160 and either 
Botany 140 or a biology course for which Zoology 160 is a prerequi- 
site. 

3. Other Requirements 

In addition to the above, the student must complete the university 
requirements as outlined in the bulletin. 

Pre-Health Program 

1. Required Courses in Chemistry 

Chemistry 106, 107, 108, 116, 117, 231, 232, 221, 222, 223, 224, 431 
432, 441, 442, 443, 444, 511, and 545. 

2. Required Supporting Courses 

Math. 116, 117; Physics 221, 222, 231, 232; German 102, 103 or 
Russian 106, 107; Zoology 160, 260, 561, and 562. 

3. Other Requirements 

In addition to the above, the students must complete the univer- 
sity requirements as outlined in the bulletin. 



Department of Chemistry 129 

II. Chemistry (Teaching) 

A. Required Courses in Chemistry 

Chemistry 106, 107, 108, 116, 117, 221, 222, 223, 224, 231, 232, 431, 432, 
441, 442, 443, 444, and 511. 

B. Required Supporting Courses 

Math. 116, 117, 300; Physics 221, 222, 231, 232; German 102, 103 or 
Russian 106, 107; Zoology 160 and either Botany 140 or a biology 
course for which Zoology 160 is a prerequisite. 

C. Required Education Courses 

Health Ed. 200; Education 300, 301, 400, 436, 500, 535, 560; Psychology 
320; English 250; and Earth Science 309. 

D. Other Requirements 

In addition to the above, the student must complete the university re- 
quirements as outlined in the bulletin. 

III. Bachelor of Science— Master of Science Program 

A. Required Courses in Chemistry 

Chemistry 106, 107, 108, 116, 117, 221, 222, 223, 224, 231, 232, 431, 
432, 441, 442, 443, 444, 511, 545, 611, 701, 702, 722, 732, 743 or 749, 
799, and 5 hours from among 600 and 700 level chemistry courses. 

B. Required Supporting Courses 

Math. 116, 117, 300; Physics 221, 222, 231, 232; German 102, 103 or 
Russian 106, 107; Zoology 160; Botany 140 or a biology course for which 
Zoology 160 is a prerequisite. 

C. Other Requirements 

In addition to the above, the student must complete the university 
requirements as outlined in the bulletin. 



PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM (ACS CERTIFIED) 

Suggested Schedule of Courses 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 2 

Chemistry 108 1 — 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 110, 116 4 5 

Physical Education _1_ _J_ 

17 17 



130 



Department of Chemistry 



Course and Number 
Chemistry 221, 222 
Chemistry 223, 232 

Chemistry 231 

Physics 221, 222 .. . 
Physics 231, 232 .. . 
Mathematics 117 . . 
German 102, 103 or 
Russian 106, 107 



Sophomore Year 




Fall Semester 


Spring Semester 


Credit 


Credit 


3 


3 


2 


2 




3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


5 




3 


3 






18 


16 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 



Course and Number 
Chemistry 441, 442 . 
Chemistry 224, 443 . 

Chemistry 511 

Mathematics 300 . . . 
Humanities 200, 201 

Zoology 160 

*Botany 140 

Elective 



Credit 
3 
2 

4 
3 
4 



16 



Credit 
3 

1 
3 



4 
_3_ 

17 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 431 3 

Chemistry 432 2 

Chemistry 444 1 

Chemistry 545 3 

Chemistry Electives 3-5 

Electives 3 

15-17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3-4 
9 



12-13 



*A biology course for which Zoology is a prerequisite may be substituted for Botany 140. 



Department of Chemistry 131 

PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM (PRE-HEALTH) 

Suggested Schedule of Courses 

The program is the same during the first two years as that of the ACS Certified 
Curriculum. 



Course and Number 
Chemistry 441, 442 . 
Chemistry 224, 443 . 

Chemistry 511 

Zoology 160, 260 ... . 
Humanities 200, 201 
Electives 



Junior Year 




Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 


Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 


2 


1 




3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


15 


17 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 
Credit 


Spring Semester 
Credit 



Course and Number 

Chemistry 431 3 

Chemistry 432 2 — 

Chemistry 444 1 — 

Chemistry 545 3 — 

Zoology 561 4 — 

Physiology 562 — 4 

Electives _3_ _8_ 

16 12 

TEACHING MAJOR CURRICULUM 

Suggested Schedule of Courses 

The program is the same during the first two years as that of the profes- 
sional curriculum except Personal Hygiene (P.E. 200) is required. 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 441, 442 3 3 

Chemistry 224, 443 2 1 

Chemistry 511 — 3 

Mathematics 300 4 — 

Zoology 160 4 — 

*Botany 140 — 4 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

English 250 — 2 

Humanities 200, 201 _3 _3_ 

18 18 

*A biology course for which Zoology 160 is a prerequisite may be substituted for Botany 140. 



132 Department of Chemistry 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 431 3 — 

Chemistry 432 2 — 

Chemistry 444 1 — 

Education 400, 500 3 3 

Education 436, 535 3 3 

Education 560 — 6 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Earth Science 309 _3_ J=L 

18 12 



COURSES IN CHEMISTRY 

Students are required to wear safety glasses in all laboratories. 



Undergraduate 

t*100. Physical Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Phy. Sc. 1601) 
A one semester introductory course designed to make clear the nature of 
science as an enterprise and illustrate by numerous examples how science 
really proceeds. Learning experiences are constructed so that they closely 
approximate real life situations where one has to search for clues and insights 
from a variety of sources. 

This course is not open to students who have received credit for Chemistry 
101, 102, 104, 105, 106 or 107. 

*101. General Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1611) 
Introduction to the study of chemistry, atomic structure and periodicity, 
chemical bonding, states of matter and phase transitions, solutions, and elec- 
trolytes. This course is designed for majors in engineering, and other sciences. 
Chemistry majors may register for this course with departmental approval. 

t*102. General Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1612) 
A continuation of general chemistry including an introduction to qualita- 
tive inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 

t*104. General Chemistry IV. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1615) 
Introduction to fundamental techniques and concepts in chemistry; includ- 
ing writing and interpretation of symbols, formulas, equations, atomic struc- 
ture, composition, and reactions of inorganic compounds. This course is not 
open to majors in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics and engineering. 



'Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. 
tGeneral Education courses. 



Department of Chemistry 133 

t*105. General Chemistry V. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1616) 
A study of elementary organic chemistry and the chemical changes which 
take place during life processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 104 or equivalent. 

t*106. General Chemistry VI. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1618) 
A course which emphasizes basic principles and important theoretical con- 
cepts of chemistry. Topics will include atomic structure, electronic configura- 
tion, the wave mechanical model of the atom, chemical bonding, states of mat- 
ter, chemical equilibria, systems of acids and bases, and electrochemistry. 

t*107. General Chemistry VII. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1619) 
A continuation of Chemistry 106. Includes chemistry of important metals 
and nonmetals and a rigorous treatment of qualitative inorganic analysis. 

108. Chemistry Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1617) 
A series of lectures and discussions on the nature and requirements of the 
chemical profession; the application of ehcmistry to modern living; and other 
selected topics. 

t*110. Physical Science Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to bring students into working contact with 
the essential aspects of scientific experiences. It is in this course that the stu- 
dent develops concrete ideas about the operational meaning of the scientific 
method and problem solving. Corequisite: Physical Science 100. 

This course is not open to students who have received credit for Chemistry 
111, 112, 114, 115, 116, or 117. 

t*lll. General Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

An introduction to quantitative studies of substances and chemical reactions. 
Emphasis is also placed on the development of manipulative skills. Corequi- 
site: Chemistry 101. 

t*112. General Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

Continuation of Chemistry 111 with an introduction to qualitative analysis. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 102. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. 

t*114. General Chemistry IV Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

A study of inorganic reactions and substances and their relation to life proc- 
esses. Corequisite: Chemistry 104. 

t*115. General Chemistry V Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

A study of organic reactions and substances and their relation to life proc- 
esses. Corequisite: Chemistry 105. Prerequisite: Chemistry 114. 



•Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for the course. 
tGeneral Education courses. 



134 Department of Chemistry 

t*116. General Chemistry VI Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

A course which emphasizes quantitative studies of chemical reactions such 
as acid-base studies, redox reactions, and equilibrium reactions. Emphasis is 
also placed on the development of manipulative skills in the laboratory. Co- 
requisite: Chemistry 106. 

t*117. General Chemistry VII Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

A continuation of Chemistry 116 with an introduction to qualitative analy- 
sis. Corequisite: Chemistry 107. Prerequisite: Chemistry 116. 

210. Cooperative Experience I Credit 2(2-0) 

A supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental 
chemical facility. The student's performance will be evaluated by reports 
from the supervisor of the experience and the departmental staff. The student 
must present a seminar regarding the experience upon return to the Univer- 
sity. 

t221. Organic Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1621) 
A study of the hydrocarbons (aliphatic and aromatic) and introduction to 
their derivatives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102, 105, or 107. 

*222. Organic Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1622) 

Continuation of the study of derivatives of hydrocarbons and more complex 
compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 

*223. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

This laboratory course emphasizes the study of physical and chemical 
properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Modern instrumentation 
such as gas and column chromatography, infrared and ultraviolet analyses 
are used. Corequisite: Chemistry 221. 

*224. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 

A continuation of Chemistry 223. However, more emphasis is placed on 
syntheses and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Corequisite: Chem- 
istry 222. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223. 

231. Quantitative Analysis I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 331) 

Titrimetric and gravimetric analyses including theory and calculations 
associated with acid-base equilibria, oxidation-reduction, nucleation, and pre- 
cipitation-complexation processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102 or 107. Co- 
requisite: Mathematics 116. 

*232. Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

This laboratory course emphasizes the basic principles of chemical separa- 
tions. Laboratory studies of gravimetric and titrimetric analyses are also en- 
countered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 117. Corequisite: Chemistry 231. 



'Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for the course. 
tGeneral Education courses. 



Department of Chemistry 135 

251. Elementary Biochemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1624) 
A study of fundamental cellular constituents. Emphasis is placed on physio- 
logical applications and analyses. Prerequisites: Chemistry 105 or 222. This 
course is open to non-chemistry majors only. 

*252. Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

Elementary biochemical reactions are studied with emphasis placed on ap- 
plications to biology, home economics and nursing. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
115 or 224. Corequisite: Chemistry 251. 

301. Current Trends in Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1641) 
A series of lectures and discussions on special problems in chemistry and of 
the chemical profession not covered in formal courses. 

310. Cooperative Experience II Credit 3(3-0) 

A supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental 
chemical facility. The student's performance will be evaluated by reports from 
the supervisor of the experience and the departmental staff. The student 
must present a seminar regarding the experience upon return to the Univer- 
sity. 

410. Cooperative Experience III Credit 4(4-0) 

A supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental 
chemical facility. The student's performance will be evaluated by reports 
from the supervisor of the experience and the departmental staff. The stu- 
dent must present a seminar regarding the experience upon return to the 
University. 

431. Quantitative Analysis II. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1662) 
A study of the theory and the operational features of some of the more im- 
portant instruments that are currently being used as analytical tools such as 
ultraviolet, visible-light, and infrared spectrophotometers, electroanalytical 
instruments, thermometric titrators, fluorimeters, etc. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 441. Corequisite: Chemistry 442. 

*432. Quantitative Analysis II Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 

This laboratory course features the utilization of modern instruments such 
as ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrophotometers. The student will also 
utilize electroanalytical instruments and thermometric titrators. Corequisite: 
Chemistry 431. 

441. Physical Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1663) 

A study of the fundamental laws governing matter in the gaseous state, and 
the laws of thermodynamics and their applications to chemistry; includes an 
introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Math. 117, Physics 
222, and Chemistry 231. 



*Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. 



136 Department of Chemistry 

442. Physical Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1664) 

A continuation of Chemistry 441. Studies of solid and liquid states, solutions, 
phase equilibria, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 441. 

*443. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

Thermodynamic and kinetic studies are emphasized in this course. Co- 
requisite: Chemistry 441. 

*444. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

A continuation of Chemistry 443. Corequisite: Chemistry 442. 

501. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 
An indepth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, struc- 
tures, and kinetics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 223. 

502. Intermediate Physical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 
An introduction to advanced theoretical physical chemistry. Prerequisite: 

Chemistry 442. 

503. Chemical Research. Credit 4(0-10) 
(Formerly 403) 

Makes use of the laboratory and library facilities in studying minor prob- 
lems of research. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and permission of the 
Department. 

504. Independent Study. Credit 4(0-10) 
(Formerly 404) 

Independent study or research in a particular area of chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department and advanced standing. 

511. Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

Introductory survey of structure and bonding in inorganic compounds; co- 
ordination compounds of the transition metals; donor-acceptor interactions; 
bonding theories. Prerequisite: Chem. 441; Corequisite: Chem. 442. 

545. Physical Chemistry III. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 502) 

A study of quantum chemistry and its application to studies of atomic and 
molecular structure. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

610. Inorganic Synthesis. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly 1670) 
Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of mani- 
pulative skills in the synthesis of inorganic substances. Prerequisites: One 
year of organic chemistry; one semester of quantitative analysis. 



•Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for the course. 



Department of Chemistry 137 

611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly 1671) 
A course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442. 

621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 501) 

An indepth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, struc- 
tures, and kinetics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 222. 

*624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly 1776) 
A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: 
One year of Organic Chemistry. 

631. Electroanalytical Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1781) 
A study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentiometry, 
potential sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of 
diffusion and electrode kinetics will also be discussed along with the factors 
which influence rate processes, the double layer, adsorption and catalytic 
reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 431 or equivalent. 

641. Radiochemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1782) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of nu- 
clear chemistry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and 
chemistry of the radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with suf- 
ficient background in chemistry and physics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 442 or 
Physics 406. 

642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications. Credit 2(1-3) 
(Formerly 1783) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in 
chemistry, biology, and other fields. Open to majors and non-majors. Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 102 or 105 or 107. 

643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly 1784) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems by 
means of the operator formulation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 442, and Physics 
222. Corequisite: Mathematics 300. 

651. General Biochemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly 1780) 
A study of modern biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics 
and energetics associated with biological reactions and includes a study of 
carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photo- 
synthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 442. 



"Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for the course. 



138 



Department of Chemistry 



GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for course descriptions. 



701. Seminar. 

(Formerly Chem. 1098) 

702. Chemical Research. 

(Formerly Chem. 1085, 1086 & 1087) 

711. Structural Inorganic Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1685) 

715. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1088 & 1089) 

716. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1686) 

721. Elements of Organic Chemistry 

(Formerly Chem. 1690) 

722. Advanced Organic Chemistry 

(Formerly Chem. 1691) 

723. Organic Reactions. 

(Formerly Chem. 1692) 

725. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1090 & 1091) 

726. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1693) 

727. Organic Preparations. 

(Formerly Chem. 1694) 

731. Modern Analytical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1787) 

732. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1788) 

735. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1092 & 1093) 

736. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1786) 

741. Principles of Physical Chemistry I. 

(Formerly Chem. 1789) 



Credit 1(1-0) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 3(2-3) 

Credit 4(4-0) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 
Credit 1-3(0-2 to 6) 

Credit 3(2-3) 

Credit 4(4-0) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 



Credit 4(3-3) 



N. C. A & T State University 
Greensboro, N. C. 27411 



Department of English 

742. Principles of Physical Chemistry II. 

(Formerly Chem. 1790) 

743. Chemical Thermodynamics. 

(Formerly Chem. 1791) 



139 
Credit 4(3-3) 

Credit 4(4-0) 



744. Chemical Spectroscopy. 

(Formerly Chem. 1792) 

745. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1094 & 1095) 

746. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1795) 

748. Colloid Chemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1794) 

749. Chemical Kinetics. 

(Formerly Chem. 1793) 

755. Special Problems in Biochemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1096 & 1097) 

756. Selected Topics in Biochemistry. 

(Formerly Chem. 1695) 

763. Selected Topics In Chemistry Instruction I. 

764. Selected Topics In Chemistry Instruction II. 

765. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction I. 

766. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction II. 

767. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction III. 

768. Special Problems In Chemistry Instruction IV. 
799. Thesis Research. 



Credit 3(2-3) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 4(4-0) 

Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 6(6-0) 
Credit 6(6-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Jimmy L. Williams, Chairman 

The English Department assumes four major responsibilities in the educa- 
tional program of the institution. First, by means of composition courses, in- 
troductory courses in literature, and laboratory courses, the department at- 



140 Department of English 

tempts to develop among the students the language skills required for intelli- 
gent communication. Second, the department provides the necessary information 
and training for prospective teachers of English. Third, the department offers 
the English majors a foundation of information and knowledge of techniques 
which will enable them to pursue graduate study effectively. Fourth, the depart- 
ment provides basic training for persons wishing to become journalists. 

The department offers courses in English language and literature, develop- 
mental reading, journalism, and the humanities. A major is offered in English. 
One may pursue either a teaching or a non-teaching major. A minor in English 
is also offered. No grade below "C" is acceptable in major course work. 

All English majors are required to study a foreign language through the 
intermediate courses. If a student has studied a foreign language for two years 
in high school, he may enroll in the intermediate course when he begins the 
language study at the University. Such a student would be required to complete 
only one year of foreign language study at the University. 

For information on graduate degree programs — M.S. in English-Education 
and the MA. in English and Afro-American literature — consult the Graduate 
School Bulletin. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM IN ENGLISH 

The Department of English offers a Teacher Education program to prepare 
students to teach English in the secondary schools of North Carolina. Students 
in the program are expected to take more than the minimum requirements for 
certification. The department feels that these added courses prepare the stu- 
dent for possible new State requirements and for graduate study. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR ENGLISH MAJORS 



Eng. 102 
Eng. 210 
Eng. 220 
Eng. 221 
Eng. 300 
Eng. 401 

Eng. 410 
Eng. 430 
Eng. 431 
Eng. 435 or 436 
Eng. 450 
Eng. 500 
Eng. 501 

>Eng. 510 



Credit Hours 


Course Name 


2 


Developmental Reading 


3 


Intro, to Literary Studies 


3 


English Literature I 


3 


English Literature II 


3 


Advanced Composition 


3 


Survey of Dramatic 




Literature II 


3 


Shakespeare 


3 


American Literature I 


3 


American Literature II 


3 


The Novel or Modern Poetry 


3 


Advanced English Grammar 


3 


Literary Research 


3 


Intro, to Hist, of Eng. 




Language 


2 


Reading Skills 



'Required only of teaching majors. 



Department of English 141 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR ENGLISH MINORS 

(Teaching and Non-Teaching) 

Eng. 210 3 Intro, to Literary Studies 

Eng. 220 3 English Literature I 

Eng. 221 3 English Literature II 

Eng. 300 3 Advanced Composition 

Eng. 410 3 Shakespeare 

Eng. 430 3 American Literature I 

Eng. 431 3 American Literature II 

Eng. 450 3 Advanced Grammar 



CONCENTRATION IN JOURNALISM 

A student desiring a concentration in journalism should take the courses 
listed below. To insure completion of the sequence, the student should begin 
taking these courses, in the order listed, not later than the second semester 
of the sophomore year and preferably during the first semester of the sopho- 
more year. 

Eng. 455 
Eng. 456 
Eng. 457 
Eng. 458 

Eng. 459 
Eng. 460 

Eng. 461 

Eng. 462 

Eng. 639 
Eng. 640 

Eng. 641 



More detailed course requirement sheets for each area of concentration are 
available in the office of the Department of English. 



3 


Newswriting 


3 


News Editing and Layout 


3 


Advanced Newswriting 


3 


Introduction to 




Communications Theory 


3 


Feature Writing 


3 


Writing for Science and 




Technology 


3 


History and Law of Mass 




C ommunications 


2 


Current Issues in Mass 




Communications 


6 


Media Internship 


3 


Writing and Announcing 




for TV-Radio 


3 


Public Information and 




Public Relations Techniques 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

The scope of the English major curriculum often prevents a student from 
pursuing a minor; consequently, the department recommends "strong elec- 
tives" which may pattern in some of the following concentrations: 



142 



Department of English 



French 400 
French 410 
French 415 
French 416 
French 505 



Education 410 
Education 411 
Education 412 
Education 413 
Education 414 
Education 415 



Foreign Language 

Phonetics 

Oral French 

Survey of French Literature I 

Survey of French Literature II 

Advanced Composition 

Library Science 

Organization and Administration of School Libraries 

Cataloging and Classification 

School Library Reference Materials 

Non-Book Material 

Reading Interest 

Techniques of Librarianship 



Music 216 
Music 217 
Art 224 
Art 400 



Music and Art 

Music Appreciation I 
Music Appreciation II 
Art Appreciation 
Renaissance Art 



Philosophy 260 
Philosophy 261 
Philosophy 262 
Philosophy 608 
Philosophy 609 



History 105 
History 107 
History 204 
History 205 
History 206 
History 207 
History 405 
History 416 
Sociology 200 
Sociology 204 
Sociology 306 
Sociology 314 
Political 
Science 230 



Philosophy 

Introduction to Philosophy 

History of Philosophy 

Logic 

Culture and Value 

Contemporary Philosophy 

Social Science 

History of Africa 

Religions and Civilization 

The United States from 1452-1865 

The United States Since 1865 

The Afro- American in the United States to 1865 

The Afro- American in the United States Since 1865 

History of England 

History of Black Culture in the United States 

Introduction to Anthropology 

Social Problems 

Minority Problems 

Black Experiences 

Introduction to Political Science 



Speech 251 
Speech 252 
Speech 253 
Speech 636 



Speech 

Public Speaking 
Argumentation and Debate 
Parliamentary Procedure 
Persuasive Communication 



Department of English 143 

Reading 

Education 637 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 

Education 638 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction 



COURSES IN ENGLISH 

*100. Ideas and Their Expression I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2401) 
An introduction to oral and written communication; provides, the student 
with experience in writing short compositions, outlining written materials, 
improving reading, speaking skills. 

*101. Ideas and Their Expressions II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2402) 
A continuation of English 100 which provides the student with additional 
experience in expository writing, with intensive instruction in descriptive, 
argumentative writing, narrative composition; introduces student to the 
techniques of investigative writing and to the skills of reading different literary 
genres; provides opportunities for additional experience in oral expression. 
Prerequisite: English 100. 

*102. Developmental Reading. Credit 1(2-0) 

(Formerly English 2403) 
Instruction and practice in methods of increasing rate of reading and tech- 
niques of comprehending written material; emphasis upon vocabulary 
study skills. Limited registration. 

Language and Composition 

*300. Advanced Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2440) 
A study of techniques of narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumenta- 
tive composition. Prerequisite: English 101. 

450. Advanced English Grammar. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2441) 
An intensive study of the structure of the English language with tolerance 
towards language dialects and levels as effective communication; emphasis 
placed upon a knowledge of grammar essential to teaching in the junior and 
senior high school. Prerequisite: English 101. 

455. Newswriting. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly English 2442) 

Theoretical and practical work in gathering, organizing, and writing news; 
primary attention to the development of journalistic technique. Prerequisite: 
English 101. 



•Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



144 Department of English 

456. News Editing and Layout. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of English 455, with primary emphasis on basic copyediting. 
Extensive practical work in copyreading, headline writing, principles of typog- 
raphy and makeup. Weekly outside news and feature assignments constitute 
the laboratory period. 

457. Advanced Newswriting. Credit (3-0) 

Consists of advanced training in specialized reporting. Extensive practice 
in reporting news and governmental and legislative agencies; exercises in writ- 
ing and reporting for radio and television and training in public relations, re- 
leases. Prerequisite: English 455. 

458. Introduction to Communications Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

Mass communications processes, systems and effects and introduction to 
legal aspects of the rights and responsibilities of the press, radio, television; 
basic features of the law of libel, privilege, copyrights, access to information. 
Prerequisite: English 101 or permission of instructor. 

459. Feature Writing. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive practicum of feature writing involving background research 
for an in-depth report of various topics. Prerequisites: English 455 & 456. 

460. Writing for Science and Technology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study and practice of the basic techniques of writing and editing scientific 
and technical materials for both the general audience and the specialists. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

461. History and Law of Mass Communications. Credit 3(3-0) 

The history of American mass media and the evolution of freedom of the 
press. An examination of the laws and ethics that govern the mass media, in- 
cluding defamation, libel, slander, obscenity, copyright, and the fairness doc- 
trine. Prerequisites: English 455 & 456. 

462. Current Issues in Mass Communications. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the rights, responsibilities and changing characteristics of the 
mass media and the problems therein. Extensive use of mass communications 
practitioners and guest speakers, and field trips. Prerequisites: English 455 & 
456. 

500. Literary Research and Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 

OPEN ONLY TO JUNIOR AND SENIOR ENGLISH MAJORS AND MI- 
NORS. 

Advanced study in the tools and techniques of literary research and critical 
analysis; emphasizes independent study, a study of the major schools of criti- 
cism, and culminates in the completion of a study of a problem in literature. 

501. Introduction to the History of the English Language. Credit (3-0) 
(Formerly English 2462) 

A course designed to develop the student's understanding of modern Eng- 
lish syntax, vocabulary, etymology, spelling, pronunciation, and usage and to 



Department of English 145 

increase the student's comprehension of English literature of previous cen- 
turies through a study of the history of the language. 

510. Reading Skills. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly English 2463) 

Open to senior English majors and minors. 

A course designed to orient students to the scope of higher-level reading 
skills and to the problems involved in promoting increased efficiency in read- 
ing and secondary school pupils. 

Literature 

210. Introduction to Literary Studies. Credit 3(3-0) 
Formerly English 2463) 
Required of English majors and minors in the sophomore year; open to 
others only with approval of instructor; the critical analysis, literary criticism, 
investigative and bibiographical techniques necessary to advanced study in 
English. This course is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in literature. 
Prerequisite: English 100. 

220. English Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2437) 

A survey of the literary movements and major authors of English literature 
in relation to the cultural history of England, from Beowulf to 1700. Prere- 
quisite: English 101, History 100-101. 

221. English Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2438) 

A continuation of English 220 from 1700— Present. Prerequisite: English 100, 
101. 

400. Survey of Dramatic Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2450) 

A survey course in the history, literature, criticism, and arts of the theatre 
to the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: English 210. 

401. Survey of Dramatic Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2451) 

A continuation of English 400, from the nineteenth century to the present. 
Prerequisite: English 210. 

410. Shakespeare. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2452) 
An introduction to a study of the works of William Shakespeare through a 
detailed examination of representative works selected from the major periods 
of his development as a dramatist. Prerequisite: English 210. 

425. World Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of selected major world writers from ancient times to the present. 



146 Department of English 

430. American Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2455) 

A study of the literary movements and major authors of American literature 
in relation to the cultural history of America from the Colonial Period to 1865. 
Prerequisite: English 210, Humanities 200-201. 

431. American Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2456) 

A continuation of English 430, from 1865 — Present. Prerequisite English 210, 
Humanities 200, 201. 

435. The Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2457) 

A study of the novel as an art form, with attention to significant English 
novelists from 1750 to the present. Prerequisite: English 210. 

436. Modern Poetry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2458) 

A study of the poetry as an art form, with attention to significant English 
and American poets of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: English 210. 

550. Senior Seminar. 

(Formerly English 2469) Credit 1(1-0) 

A discussion of problems in literature and composition. Prerequisite: 21 hours 
of English above English 101 and including English 210. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

603. Introduction to Folklore. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2498) 
Basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. (Cross listed as 
Anthropology 603.) 

620. Elizabethan Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2471) 

Chief Elizabethan plays, tracing the development of dramatic forms from 
early works to the close of the theaters in 1642. Prerequisite: English 210, 
220-221. 

621. Grammar and Composition for Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2472) 

A course designed to provide a review of the fundamentals of grammar and 
composition for the elementary or secondary school teacher. (Not accepted 
for credit toward undergraduate or graduate concentration in English.) 



Department of English 147 

626. Children's Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2476) 

A study of the types of literature designed especially for students in the upper 
levels of elementary school and in junior high school. (Not accepted for credit 
toward graduate concentration in English.) Prerequisite: English 101, Human- 
ities 200-201. 

627. Literature for Adolescents. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course to acquaint prospective and in-service teachers with a wide variety 
of good literature that is of interest to adolescents. Emphasis on thermatic ap- 
proach to the study of literature, bibliotherapy, continental writers, book 
selection, and motivating students to read widely and independently with depth 
and understanding. Prerequisites: English 101, 200, and 201 or graduate stand- 
ing. 

628. The American Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2478) 

A history of the American novel from Copper, to Faulkner. Melville, Twain, 
Howells, James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, and Hemingway will 
be included. Prerequisite: English 210. 

629. The Negro Writer in American Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of prose, poetry, and drama by American Authors of African 
ancestry. Their works will be studied in relation to the cultural and literary 
traditions of their times, Dunbar, Chestnutt, Johnson, Cullen, Bontemps, 
Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, and Yerby will be included. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or English 101, Humanities 200-201. 

639. Media Internship Credit 6(1-10) 
On-the-job training with local news gathering organizations; and a critical 

analysis of a contemporary communications problem. Prerequisites: English 
455 and 456 or 457. 

640. Writing and Announcing for TV-Radio. Credit 3(2-2) 
Techniques and practices of editing and preparing local and wire news copy 

for radio and television news broadcasts; laboratory practice in preparation 
of same for actual broadcasting. Prerequisites: English 455 and 456 or 457. 

641. Public Information and Credit 3(3-0) 
Public Relations Techniques. 

Publicity methods as employed by educational institutions, federal agencies 
and private industries; how to communicate through newspapers, magazines, 
radio-television stations and other media. Prerequisite: English 455 or graduate 
standing. 

650. Afro-American Folklore. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of folk tales, ballads, riddles, proverbs, superstitions and folk songs 
of black Americans. Parallels will be drawn between folklore peculiar to black 
Americans and that of Africa, the Carribean, and other nationalities. 



148 Department of English 

652. Afro-American Drama Credit 3(3-0) 

A detailed study of the dramatic theory and practice of black American 
writers against the backdrop of Continental and American trends. Special at- 
tention will be given to the works of major figures from the Harlem Renais- 
sance to the present. Works by Bontemps, Cullen, Hughes, Hansberry, Ward, 
Davis, Baldwin, Baraka (Jones), Gordone, and Bullins will be included. 

654. Afro- American Novel I. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by 
major black writers through 1940. Novelists emphasized include Dunbar, 
Chesnutt, Toomer, McKay, Larsen, Hurston, Griggs, Fauset, and Wright. 

656. Afro-American Novel II. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by 
major black writers after 1940. Novelists emphasized include Wright, Ellison, 
Baldwin, Himes, Demby, Williams, Walker, Brooks, Petry, Gaines, and May- 
field. 

658. Afro-American Poetry I. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro-American poetry from its beginning to 1940 with 
special attention given to poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Poets to be studied 
include Terry, Hammon, Wheatley, A. A. Whitman, Horton, Braithwaite, J. W. 
Johnson, Home, Fenton Johnson, Georgia Douglas Johnson, McKay, Cullen, 
Cuney, and Hughes. 

660. Afro-American Poetry II. Credit 3(3-0) 

An intensive study of Afro-American poetry from 1940 to the present with 
considerable attention given to the revolutionary poets of the sixties and 
seventies. Poets to be studied include Hughes, Walker, F. M. Davis, Brooks, 
Brown, Hayden, Tolson, Lee, Reed, Giovanni, Angelou, Jeffers, Sanchez, Red- 
mond, Fabio, Fields, and Jones. 

662. History of American Ideas. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of major ideas which have animated American thought from the 
beginning to the present. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. 

700. Literary Analysis and Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2485) 
An introduction to intensive textual analysis of poetry, prose fiction, prose 
non-fiction, and drama. A study of basic principles and practices in literary 
criticism and of the various schools of criticism from Plato to Eliot. 

702. Milton. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2486) 
A study of the works of Milton in relation to the cultural and literary trends 
of seventeenth-century England. Emphasis is placed upon Milton's poetry. 



Department of English 149 

704. Eighteenth Century English Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2487) 

A study of the major prose and poetry writers of the eighteenth century in 
relation to the cultural and literary trends. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, 
Addison, Pope, Johnson, and Blake will be included. 

710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2488) 

A course designed to provide elementary school teachers with an opportunity 
to discuss problems related to the language arts taught in the elementary 
school. (Not accepted for credit towards concentration in English.) 

720. Studies in American Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2489) 
A study of major American prose and poetry writers. 

749. Romantic Prose and Poetry of England. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2490) 

A study of nineteenth-century British authors whose works reveal character- 
istics of Romanticism, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Lamb, 
Carlyle, and De Quincey will be included. 

750. Victorian Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of nineteenth-century Victorian writing, including poetry, fiction, 
and non-fictional prose. Among the writers to be considered will be Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, Carlyle, Mill, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Thackeray, 
and Hardy. 

751. Modern British and Continental Fiction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2491) 

A study of British and European novelists from 1914 until the present. In- 
cluded in the study are Joyce, Kafka, Gide, Mann, and Camus. 

752. Restoration and 18th Century Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2492) 

A study of the theatre and drama in relation to the cultural trends of the 
period. Etherege, Farquhar, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Fielding, Gay, Steele, Gold- 
smith, and Sheridan will be included. 

753. Literary Research and Bibliography. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2493) 

An introduction to tools and techniques used in investigation of literary 
subjects. 

754. History and Structure of the English Language. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2494) 

A study of the changes in the English language-syntax, vocabulary, spelling, 
pronunciation, and usage from the fourteenth century through the twentieth 
century. 



150 Department of English 

755. Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2495) 

A course designed to provide secondary teachers of English with experi- 
ences in Linguistics applied to modern grammar and composition. 

760. Non fiction by Afro-American Writers. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of non-fiction by black writers including slave narratives, autobiog- 
raphies, biographies, essays, letters and orations. 

762. Short Fiction by Afro-American Writers. Credit 3(3-0) 

An extensive examination of short fiction by Afro-American writers. Among 
those included are Chesnutt, Dunbar, Toomer, Hurston, McKay Hughes, 
Bontemps, Wright, Clarke, Ellison, Fair, Alice Walker, Ron Milner, Julia 
Fields, Jean W. Smith, Petry, Baldwin, Kelley, and Jones. 

764. Black Aesthetics. Credit 3(3-0) 

A definition of those qualities of black American literature which distin- 
guish it from traditional American literature through an analysis of theme, form, 
and technique as they appear in a representative sample of works by black 
writers. 

766. Seminar in Afro-American Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

and Language. 

A topics course which will vary; focus will be on prominent themes and/or 
subjects treated by Afro-American writers from the beginning to the present. 
An attempt will be made to characterize systematically the idiom (modes of 
expression, style) of Afro-American Writers. 

770. Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2499) 

Prerequisite: 15 hours of graduate-level courses in English. 
Provides an opportunity for presentation and discussion of thesis, as wll as 
selected library or original research projects from non-thesis candidates. 

775. Thesis Research. Credit 3(3-0) 



COURSES IN HUMANITIES 
Undergraduate 

200. Survey of Humanities I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the interrelationship of literature, music, and the fine arts; a 
study of master works, philosophical ideas, and artistic movements of Western 
Civilization, with attention given also to non-Western culture. Will survey 
cultures from ancient times to the end of the Middle Ages. Prerequisite: 
English 101. 



Department of Foreign Languages 151 

201. Survey of Humanities II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of English 200. Will begin with the Renaissance and will in- 
clude Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, and modern modes of artistic expression. 
Prerequisites: English 101 and Humanities 200. 

420. Humanities III, Great Ideas of World Civilization. Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar devoted to the identification, analysis, and appreciation of some of 
the basic ideas or conceptions which have underlain world culture in the arts, 
religion, philosophy and social attitudes from ancient times to the present. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Waverlyn N. Rice, Chairman 

The program of the Department of Foreign Languages is based on the principle 
that ability to converse and understand people of other nations as well as a 
knowledge of one's own language, is basic to a democratic society. In view of 
this, the objectives are: 

1. To develop reasonable facility in the reading, listening, speaking, and 
writing of modern foreign languages. 

2. To develop a better knowledge of modern foreign cultures. 

3. To create a spirit of understanding that will result in proper attitudes 
toward different national groups. 

4. To prepare students as teachers of foreign languages for employment in 
secondary schools. 

5. To encourage students who manifest linguistic ability to continue further 
study and research. 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses in French, Spanish, 
Russian, and German. A major is given in French (Teaching and Professional). 

Teaching major — The curriculum in this area requires that a student, first 
of all, complete all courses and regulations as outlined by the Department of 
Education for certification at the secondary school level. In addition, a stu- 
dent is required to complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of French beyond 
the elementary level. Courses to be taken are as follows: 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FRENCH MAJORS 

Course No. Credit Hours Course Name 

*French 300 3 Intermediate French I 

*French 301 3 Intermediate French II 

French 400 3 French Phonetics 

French 410 3 Intermediate Oral French 

French 411 3 Advanced Oral French 

French 415 3 Survey of French Literature I 

French 416 3 Survey of French Literature II 

French 508 3 French Civilization 



•Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



152 Department of Foreign Languages 

French majors are to select a minimum of twelve (12) hours from the following 
courses to complete requirements. 

Credit 

Course No. Hours Course Name 

French 505 3 Advanced French Composition 

French 506 3 Advanced French Grammar and Composition 

Rrench 607 3 French Literature of the Seventeenth Century 

French 608 3 French Literature of the Eighteenth Century 

French 609 ■ 3 French Literature of the Nineteenth Century 

French 610 3 The French Theatre 

French 612 3 The French Novel 

French 614 3 French Syntax 

French 616 3 Contemporary French Literature 

Professional major — This curriculum requires the student to complete the 
same number of hours as for the teaching program. In addition he is to take 
as many hours as possible in the other foreign languages offered by the De- 
partment. This curriculum is especially recommended for students who wish 
to follow a career as translators and interpreters as well as advanced ROTC 
students in Army or Air Intelligence. 

A minor may be achieved in French and Spanish by students who complete 
a minimum of 21 semester hours in Spanish and 24 hours in French. 

Students who have completed one unit of high school language or who have 
no knowledge of a language are to enroll in an elementary language course. 
For those students presenting two units or more of high school credits, French 
300, and French 301, or Spanish 320 and Spanish 321 are required. 

COURSES IN FRENCH 

Undergraduate 

*100. Elementary French I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 101, 102, 2500) 
A course for beginners which emphasizes the four language skills — reading, 
writing, speaking, listening. Prerequisite: none. 

*101. Elementary French II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 102, 103, 2501) 
A continuation of French 100 with further emphasis placed on the oral- 
aural approach. Prerequisite: French 100, or equivalent. 

*300. Intermediate French I Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 201, 2520) 
A course which consists of a brief review of pronunciation. Grammar is 
stressed with emphasis on easy cultural reading. Prerequisite: French 100 
and 101, or two units of high school French. 

*301. Intermediate French II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 202, 2521) 
This course is a continuation of French 300. Stress is placed on grammar, 
cultural reading and conversation. Prerequisite: French 300, or equivalent. 



•Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



Department of Foreign Languages 153 

400. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 203, 2522) 
A course in French sounds and diction. Required of all students majoring 
and minoring in French. Recommended for those who wish to improve pro- 
nunciation. Prerequisite: French 300 and 301. 

410. Intermediate Oral French. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 204, 2523) 

Intermediate oral French Course which prepares students for French 2524. 
It is designed to enable students to understand lectures and conversations of 
average tempo. Prerequisite: French 300 and 301. 

411. Advanced Oral French. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 205, 2524) 

A course' which offers to students intensive training in self-expression and 
an opportunity to improve pronunciation, diction, reading and speaking. 

415. Survey of French Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 301, 2540) 

A general introduction to the study of French literature. This course gives a 
clear idea of the great periods and main tendencies in history of French 
thought and letters from 842 to the 18th century. 

416. Survey of French Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 301, 2541) 

A continuation of French literature from the 18th century to the present. 

505. Advanced French Composition. 

(Formerly French 401, 2560) 
Advanced course in oral and written self expression in French. Special 
attention to vocabulary building, free composition and conversation, prepared 
and improvised, covering the many phases of everyday activities. 

506. Advanced French Grammar and Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 402, 2561) 

Course designed to give the students practical training in the use of ad- 
vanced French grammar and reading. Conducted largely in French. 

508. French Civilization. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 404, 2562) 
A general survey of the history of France, with emphasis on the social, 
political and economic development designed to give the students an under- 
standing of present conditions and events. A detailed study of such French 
institutions as art, music, and education. Course is also offered in conjunc- 
tion with reports of collateral readings. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Problems and Trends in Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 501, 2571) 

Problems encountered by teachers given consideration. Place and purpose 
of foreign language in the curriculum today. 



154 Department of Foreign Languages 

603. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 502) 
Designed for teachers of foreign languages to improve pronunciation and 
spelling. 

606. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 503, 2573 

Open to students who are interested in undertaking the study of a special 
problem in the teaching of a foreign language. 

607. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 302, 2574) 

Course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, 
Moliere and other authors of the "Golden Period" in French letters. 

608. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 303, 2575) 
To study in particular the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, 
and the Encyclopedists. 

609. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 304, 2576) 

Study of the great literary currents of the Nineteenth century Romanticism 
and Realism. 

610. The French Theatre. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 504, 2577) 

A thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the present. 

612. The French Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 505, 2578) 
A study of the novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present. 

614. French Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 506, 2579) 
Designed to teach grammar on the more advanced level. 

616. Contemporary French Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 305 and 2542, 2580) 
Course deals with the chief writers and literary currents from 1900 to the 
present. 



FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

For descriptions of these courses, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

720. Advanced Reading and Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 601 and 2580, 2585) 



Department of Foreign Languages 155 

722. Romantic Movement in France (1820-1848). Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 602 and 2581, 2586) 

724. Seminar in Foreign Languages. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 603 and 2582, 2587) 

726. Contemporary Literary Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 604 and 2583, 2588) 

728. Independent Study in Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2584, 2589) 



COURSES IN SPANISH 



Undergraduate 

*104. Elementary Spanish I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 101, 102, 2504) 
A course for beginners which consists of grammar, composition, transla- 
tion, practice in pronunciation and use of the spoken language. 

*105. elementary Spanish II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 102, 103, 2505) 
Continuation of Elementary Spanish 104. Attention is given to advanced 
grammar. Prerequisite: Spanish 2504 or equivalent. 

*320. Intermediate Spanish I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 201, 2530) 
Review of grammar, composition and conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish 
105 or two years of high school Spanish. 

*321. Intermediate Spanish II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 202, 2531) 
Continuation of Spanish 320. Prerequisite: Spanish 2530 or equivalent. 

440. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 202, 2532) 

A systematic analysis of speech sounds, and the operation of phonetic laws. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. 

441. Intermediate Conversation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 204, 2533) 

Practice and drill in oral Spanish based principally on topics of current in- 
terest. Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. 



'Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



156 Department of Foreign Languages 

422. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 250, 2534) 

Readings of representative authors of Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or 
equivalent. 

450. La Cultura Hispanica. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 301, 2543) 

A course which covers the basically significant elements of Hispanic Civili- 
zation: geography, history, literature, and economics of the Spanish people. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. 

451. Survey of Spanish Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 302. 2544) 

A survey of Spanish literature from the Cid through the golden age with 
assigned readings and reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. 

452. Survey of Spanish Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 303, 2545) 

A survey of Spanish literature from the seventeenth century to the present. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. 

455. Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 304, 2546) 

Systematic study of Spanish grammar with conversational and other ex- 
ercises based on contemporary authors. Prerequisite: Spanish 320. 

COURSES IN GERMAN 

*102. Elementary German I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 101, 102, 2502) 
Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar. Attention given to prepared 
and sight translations and vocabulary building. 

*103. Elementary German II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 102, 103, 2503) 
Continuation of emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, prepared and 
sight translations. Maximum attention given to graded readings in German 
prose and drama. 

420. Conversational German. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 201, 2526) 
Intensive practice in everyday German is provided. Prerequisites are Ger- 
man 102, 103, or approval of instructor. 

422. Intermediate German I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 202, 2527) 
This course is open to students who have completed German 102 and 103. 
The students read a cross-section of the simpler writings in German literature 
and German newspapers. 



•Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



Department of History 157 

423. Intermediate German II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 203, 2528) 
The students continue simple readings from German literature and read 
also a significant, simplified novel. 

425. Intermediate Scientific German. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 205, 206, 2529) 
Works in science on the second-year level. 

427. Survey of German Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 2530) 
A general introduction to the study of German literature. This course is in- 
tended to give an over-all picture of German literature and an opportunity to 
read outstanding works not offered in other German courses. 

COURSES IN RUSSIAN 

*106. Elementary Russian I. 

(Formerly Russian 2506) 
An elementary course for beginners which consists of grammar, transla- 
tion, practice in pronunciation and limited use of the spoken language. 
Prerequisite: None. 

*107. Elementary Russian II. 

(Formerly Russian 2507) 
Continuation of Elementary Russian 2506. Attention is given to more ad- 
vanced grammar. Reading in Russian is stressed. 
Prerequisite: Russian 106. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Robert J. Cannon, Acting Chairman 

The Department is organized to help students develop the abilities for analysis 
and critical judgment in dealing with matters of an historical nature. It aims 
further to encourage students to express themselves in constructive and mean- 
ingful ways as members of the society in which they live. 

To achieve these goals for all students the department: 1) contributes to the 
general education of students by providing an historical, geographical, and 
philosophical background for the study of the arts, sciences and technical 
studies; 2) provides historical content for students preparing for careers in 
fields such as education, law, religion, social service, journalism, history, and 
government service; 3) provides a course of study leading to the Baccalaureate 
degree in history and/ or social sciences; 4) provides a course of study leading 
to the Master of Science degree in education with a concentration in history or 
social sciences, and provides graduate education for career historians for en- 
trance into doctoral programs. 



•Courses may be taken to satisfy General Education requirements. 



158 Department of History 

A system of student advisement is available to all students in the Department. 
It is imperative that all students make use of the assistance of the faculty ad- 
visors especially in planning their educational program. 



Major Programs 

The Department offers preparation leading to the Baccalaureate degree in: 
1) History; 2) Teaching Major in History; 3) Teaching Major in Social Sciences; 
and 4) the Master of Education degree with concentrations in History and/ or 
Social Sciences.* The program for history majors is designed to provide basic 
educational preparation for students interested in careers as historians or in 
related fields. These students are prepared to continue in graduate and pro- 
fessional school programs. 

The programs for teacher preparation are designed for those students who 
desire careers as teachers in history or social sciences in secondary schools. 



HISTORY MAJOR 

The major in history must complete 124 semester hours of University courses. 
Included in the 124 semester hours are thirty hours of history in courses at the 
200 level or above. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in these courses. 

Course Requirements 

Credit Hours 

Biological Science 100 and 8 

Physical Science 100 8 

History 100, 101 (General Education courses) 6 

English 100, 101, 102 8 

Mathematics 101, 102 6 

Physical Education or Health Education 2 

History 150, 204, 205, 303, 304, 250 16 
Economics 301, 302 
Political Science 200 

Anthropology 200 15 
Geography 200 or 210 
Sociology 

Economics 305 or Sociology 302 (Statistics) 3 

Foreign Language 12 

Philosophy 261 or 262 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Humanities 200, 201 6 

Speech 250 2 

History electives (200 or above) 15 

Minor 18 

Electives 1 

124 



*See the Bulletin of the Graduate School 



Department of History 159 



TEACHING MAJOR IN HISTORY 



The teaching major in history must complete a minimum of 124 semester 
hours of University courses. Included in these 124 hours are thirty semester 
hours of history courses at the 200 level or above with grades of "C" or better. 



Course Requirements 

Credit Hours 
Biological Science 100 and 

Physical Science 100 8 

English 100, 101, 102 8 

Physical Education or Health Education 2 

Mathematics 101, 102 6 

Psychology 320 3 

Speech 250 2 

History 100, 101 (General Education courses) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Humanities 200, 201 6 

History 150, 204, 205, 303, 304, 250 16 
Economics 301, 302 
Political Science 200 or 210 
Geography 200 or 210 

Sociology 18 
Sociology 
Anthropology 
Social Science elective 

Philosophy 261 or 262 3 
Education 300, 301, 400, 436, 500 

536, 560, 637 25 

History electives (200 or above) 15 

124 



TEACHING MAJOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The teaching major in social sciences is an interdisciplinary sequence of 
study. Students pursuing this program must complete 124 semester hours of 
University courses. Included in the 124 hours are forty-five hours in the social 
sciences with a grade of "C" or better. 



160 Department of History 

Course Requirements 

Credit Hours 
Biological Science 100 and 

Physical Science 100 8 

English 100, 101, 102 8 

Mathematics 101, 102 6 

Physical Education or Health Education 2 

Speech 250 2 

Humanities 200, 201 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 100, 101 (General Education courses) 6 

Psychology 320 3 

History 150, 204, 205, 303, 304, 250 16 

History electives (200 or above) 9 
Political Science 200 or 210 or 333 or 

440 or 542 
Economics 301, 302 

Geography 200 or 210 15 
Sociology 
Anthropology 200 
Education 300, 301, 400, 436, 500, 

536, 560, 637 25 

Social Science electives 12 

124 



The Minor in History 

Students desiring to minor in history must complete eighteen semester hours 
in history at the 200 level or above including History 204, 205, 303 and 304. 



COURSES IN HISTORY 

Undergraduate 

* 100. History of World Civilizations-Part I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A general view of the development of the social, political, economic, religious, 
and cultural life in world civilizations. Part I treats the period from the Ancient 
World through the 17th century. 

*101. History of World Civilization— Part II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural life 
in world civilizations from the Age of Enlightenment to the present. 

107. Religions and Civilization. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course that surveys the origin and development of the traditional religions 
of India and China and the three "Religions of the Book": Judaism, Chris- 
tianity, and Islam. 



'General Education courses 



Department of History 161 

150. Freshman Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

For departmental majors in their entering semester. An orientation and ad- 
visement program, including curricula, careers, study methods, and the use 
of library facilities for reference and research. 

204. United States from 1492-1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey of the origin and development of the American nation to 1865. 

205. United States Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of History 204. 

208. History of North Carolina. Credit 3(3-0) 

A general survey of North Carolina from colonial times to the present. 

215. History of Africa to 1800. Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey history of Africa to 1800. 

216. History of Africa Since 1800. Credit 3(3-0) 
(A continuation of History 215) 

A survey history of Africa since 1800. 

250. The Nature, Study, and Writing of History. Credit 3(3-0) 

The course includes material and presentations leading to an understanding 
of the basic nature of history, how to study it, methods and techniques in re- 
searching and writing it, various aspects and components of general history, 
and more summarily, with historiography and philosophies of history. 

300. Ancient History. Credit 3(3-0) 

A history of the civilizations from the beginnings through the Roman Em- 
pire. 

301. Medieval History. Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey of major developments in Medieval Europe. 

303. Early Modern Europe: Renaissance to 1815. Credit 3(3-0p 

A survey of major trends in the development of early modern Europe. Topics 
to be discussed include: Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, En- 
lightenment, Absolutism, and the French Revolution. 

304. Modern Europe Since 1815. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey emphasizing main trends in European development; political and 
social impact of the French Revolution; Industrial Revolution; authoritarianism 
vs. liberalism; church vs. state; nationalism; imperalism; World Wars I and II; 
Communism, Nazism, present-day Europe. 

305. Socialism Since Karl Marx. Credit 1(1-0) 

This course will trace and analyze the transformation of socialism from a 
critique of industrial capitalism into a theory of economic growth for develop- 
ing nations. Special emphasis will be placed on the writings and practices of 
Marx, Lenin, and Mao. 



162 Department of History 

306. History of Women Since 1800. Credit 1(1-0) 

This course will trace the changes in female self-images and roles since the 
early 19th century in Europe and the United States. It will concentrate upon 
the growth of new educational and occupational opportunities for women, 
changing concepts of motherhood, and the rise of female protest move- 
ments. 

307. The Historical Origins of Environmental Crises. Credit 1(1-0) 

This course will deal with man's changing philosophical and technological 
relationship with his natural environment since the start of the Industrial 
Revolution. 

310. The Afro-American in the United States to 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the history of the Negroes in the United States from the African 
background through the emancipation. Emphasis is on American slavery, 
abolition movement, and the Free Negro community. 

311. The Afro-American in the United States Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of History 310. Particular emphasis is placed upon the strug- 
gle for equality. 

325. Colonial Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey dealing with exploration and settlement, and political, economic, 
and social development of Latin America beginning with the ethnic backbround 
of the peoples and concluding with the wars for independence. 

326. History of Republican Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of History 325, covering Latin American history from in- 
dependence to the present time. 

330. History of the Far East, I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the history and culture of the Chinese and Japanese peoples from 
the classical civilizations to the arrival of the European nations. 

331. History of the Far East, II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the modern history of the Far East, an analysis of the reaction of 
China, Japan, and Korea to the western powers and the growth of these nations 
into modern powers. 

334. Honors in History. Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive reading and study or research in the field of history for depart- 
mental majors with a 3.0 average. 

402. The Rise of Christianity. Credit 3(3-0) 

A historical study of the origins and development of the Christian Church 
from its beginnings to the end of the ancient world (around 476 A.D.) The po- 
litical, social, economic, intellectual, and religious environment will be con- 
sidered equally along with the internal development of Christian institutions, 
beliefs, and practices. 



Department of History 163 

403. The Renaissance and the Reformation. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the background, causes, and progress of the intellectual and cul- 
tural movements in Europe in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth cen- 
turies. 

405. History of England. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course concentrates on English history since 1688. Special attention is 
given to the following topics: Glorious Revolution, industrialization, imperialism, 
decolonization, Victorianism, Ireland, and the current crisis in English society. 

407. American Diplomatic History. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the relations of the United States with other nations in the 20th 
century, with special reference to the development and use of the economic, 
political, military, and naval power necessary to give support to policy. 

410. American Constitutional History. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the constitutional development of the United States from the 
adoption of the Constitution to the present time. 

412. Modernization in Africa from 1920 to the Present. Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of African development since World War I and how traditional 
ideas have been lost, regained, or compromised with new conflicting ideas. 

416. History of Black Culture in the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

Focus on early cultural developments, folk culture, and religion in ante- 
bellum America; social and cultural trends in the twentieth century; the 
"Harlem Renaissance"; urban life. 

420. Seminar: Urban America. Credit 3(3-0) 

Special topics in the rise of the American city and the development of urban 
patterns of life, concentration on such themes as population shifts to cities, the 
development of slums and ghettos, growth of municipal institutions and 
services, and the relationship of government with city residents. (Prerequisite: 
205 and consent of the instructor.) 

430. Topics in Twentieth Century American History. Credit3(3-0) 

In depth analysis of selected topics since the late nineteenth century, with 
special emphasis on written historical communication. Prerequisite: six hours 
of American history (204 and 205) and the consent of the instructor. 

440. Russia to 1917. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of Russian history from earliest times to the downfall of the Romanov 
dynasty in 1917. Emphasis is on those characteristics which contribute to the 
understanding of contemporary Russia. 

441. Russia in the Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of Imperial Russia from 1900 to 1917, followed by a survey of 
the Soviet Union from 1917 to the present. 



164 Department of History 

450. Modernization in Historical Perspective. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course concentrates on an analysis of the various paths of modernity 
taken by several advanced societies, notably England, France, Germany, Rus- 
sia, Japan, and the United States. In particular, attention will be devoted to 
the causes and effects of: industrialization, the formation of new social classes 
and attitudes, urbanization and demographic growth, bureaucratization, 
changes in family structure, intellectual responses to rapid change, and the 
development of the modern state. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution. Credit 3(3-0) 
Intensive analysis of special problems in Colonial and Revolutionary America. 

603. The Civil War and Reconstruction. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with a summary of the Civil War, then treats the his- 
toriography of the Reconstruction Period, the Reconstruction of the South, 
and the restoration of the Union. 

604. Contemporary History of the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

The United States from the Great Depression of the 1930's to the present, 
including problems of contemporary America. 

605. Seminar on the Soviet Union. Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar course on the Soviet Union including extensive reading and 
discussion and a major research paper. 

615. Seminar in the History of Black America. Credit 3(3-0) 

A reading, research, and discussion course which concentrates attention on 
various aspects of the life and history of Afro-Americans. 

616. Seminar in African History. Credit 3(3-0) 
Research, writing and discussion on selected topics in African history. 

617. Readings in African History. Credit 3(3-0) 
By arrangement with instructor. 

620. American Social and Cultural Forces to 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the social and cultural forces in the development of American 
society up to 1865. 

621. American Social and Cultural Forces Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of History 620, which is also open to those who wish to take 
the course separately. 

625. Seminar in Historiography and Historical Method. Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of the writing of history as well as training in research methodology 
and communication. 



Department of History 165 

626. The French Revolution and Napoleon. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of causes, course, and consequences of the Revolutionary Period, 
plus evaluation of the theories of Revolution in light of the French experi- 
ence. 

630. Studies in European History, 1815-1914. Credit 3(3-0) 
Intensive study of selected topics in Nineteenth-Century European History. 

631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, Credit 3(3-0) 

1914 to the Present. 

Reading courses in contemporary European history since 1914. 



Courses for Graduates Only 
701. Recent United States Diplomatic History. Credit 3(3-0) 

704. United States in the Early Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 

706. Independent Study in History. Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement. 

712. The Black American in the Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 

730. Seminar in History. Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor. 

740. History, Social Sciences, and Contemporary Credit 3(3-0) 

World Problems. 

Readings, discussions, and reports on the relationships between history and 
the social sciences as a whole as well as their combined role in dealing with 
contemporary world problems. 

750. Thesis in History. Credit 3-6 

Thesis work will be done with the appropriate instructor in accordance with 
field of interest. 

PHILOSOPHY 

260. Introduction to Philosophy. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory course covering such topics as theories of reality, the na- 
ture of mind and knowledge, and the higher values of life. 

261. History of Philosophy. Credit 3(3-0) 

The history of philosophic thought is traced from ancient Greek philosophers 
to modern philosophers through Hegel. 

262. Logic. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory course designed to give a critical analysis of the principles, 
problems and fallacies in reasoning. 



166 Department of History 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

608. Culture and Value. Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical study of the nature and justification of basic ethical concepts in 
light of historical thought. 

609. Contemporary Philosophy. Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical investigation of some contemporary movements in philosophy with 
special emphasis on existentialism, pragmatism, and positivism. 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY 

Undergraduate 
*200. Principles of Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the principles of geography. 

*210. World Regional Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the geographic character of the major culture regions of the world. 
Contemporary cultural characteristics are examined within the framework of 
both environmental relationsiips and historical development. 

319. Regional Geography of Anglo-America. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of geographic regions of the United States and Canada. 

321. Political Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

Theories of political geography; territorial changes and their political 
significance; problems in political unification, centralization and federation. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 230 or 330 or 200 or 210 

322. Economic Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

A geographical survey of major economic activities as agriculture, forestry, 
fishing, mining, manufacturing, and commerce. Emphasis is placed upon 
areal patterns of production and exchange. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

640. Topics in Geography of AngloAmerica. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada are 
studied intensively. Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and research 
and upon group discussion. 

641. Topics in World Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in geography are studied intensively. Concern is for cultural 
characteristics and their interrelationships with each other and with habitat. 
Emphasis is upon reading, research, and discussion. 



•General Education Courses 



Department of Mathematics 167 

650. Physical Geography I. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the surface of the earth, including means of representation of 
the earth's surface, earth-sun relationships, and processes of landform shap- 
ing. 

651. Physical Geography II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Physical Geography I concentrating on climate and weather, 
natural vegetation and animal life, soils and association of physical landscape 
attributes. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Wendell P. Jones, Chairman 

PURPOSE 

In conjunction with the overall purpose and philosophy of the University, 
the Department of Mathematics believes that its program should be geared to 
provide training in mathematics that will prepare the student for living and 
will meet the demands of a democratic and complex society. Its graduates 
can emerge as capable, well adjusted citizens with a high degree of achieve- 
ment and intellectual curiosity to cope with the dynamics of any mathe- 
matical environment into which they are placed. 

PROGRAMS AND OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Mathematics offers three programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree, namely, a program in engineering mathematics, 
one in mathematics and one in mathematics education. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 

1. To prepare the student to do graduate study in applied mathematics. 

2. To prepare the student for service in industry and government. 

3. To prepare the student for independent investigations in the areas of 
science and mathematics. 

4. To inspire the student with the desire for continued growth in areas of 
mathematical inquiry. 

OBJECTIVES OF MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 

1. To prepare the student to do graduate work in the area of mathematics. 

2. To prepare the student for independent investigation in the area of 
mathematics. 

3. To inspire the student with the desire for continued growth in areas of 
mathematical inquiry. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 
(TEACHER EDUCATION) 

1. To prepare the student for graduate study in the area of mathematics and 
professional education. 



168 Department of Mathematics 

2. To prepare the teacher of mathematics to present mathematics in a 
modern, meaningful, stimulating manner at the secondary level. 

3. To prepare the teacher with sufficient quantity and quality of mathematics 
to provide competent counseling in the several opportunities available 
in mathematics. 

4. To develop in the teacher an appreciation for mathematical rigor, and 
an appreciation of mathematics as an art as well as a tool. 

5. To develop in the teacher an understanding of and an appreciation for 
the development of mathematics from antiquity to the present. 

6. To inspire in the prospective teacher a desire for continued growth in 
areas of mathematical inquiry. 



THE ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS PROGRAM* 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 116. 117 5 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 .... 2 2 

Electives or Air or Military Science . . . _J_ 1_ 

15 15 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 4 

Mathematics 240, 440 3 3 

Physics 221, 222 5 5 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Electives or Air or Military Science . . . _2_ _2^ 

17 17 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 511, 512 3 3 

Mathematics 507, 508 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering 441, 442 .... 3 3 

English 250 2 — 

Physics 406 — 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Health Education 200 — 2 

Electives __3_ __3_ 

17 20 



'Offered in cooperation with the School of Engineering. 



Department of Mathematics 



169 



Course and Number 

Physics 400, 600 

Mathematics 224, Elective 


Senior 


Yeai 


Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
_3 

18 


Spr 


ing Sem 
Credit 
3 
3 


Mathematics 350, 520 . . . 






3 


Economics 301, 302" .... 






3 


Foreign Language 

(French or German) . . . 






3 


Electives 






3 








18 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR MATHEMATICS MAJORS 



The 16 courses required for General Education 



Course No. 

Ed. 100 

Phy. Ed. 200 
*Physics 221 
♦Physics 222 

Physics 406 

Math. Ill 

Math. 113 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 



Course Title 

Orientation 

Personal Hygiene 

General Physics I 

General Physics II 

Introduction to Modern Physics 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

College Geometry 

Linear Albegra and Matrix Theory I 

Seminar in Mathematics 

Intermediate Analysis I 

Abstract Algebra I 

Math. (15 hours beyond Math. 507. Must include Math. 508 

or Math. 512). 

Electives 



221 
222 

242 
350 
505 
507 
511 



Credit Hours 
1 
2 
5 
5 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

15 
22 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR MATHEMATICS MAJORS 
(TEACHER EDUCATION) 

The 16 courses required for General Education 



Course No. 
Phy. Ed. 200 
Ed. 100 
Ed. 300 
Ed. 301 

Ed. 400 

Ed. 500 

Ed. 529 
Ed. 560 



Course Title Credit Hours 

Personal Hygiene 2 

Orientation 1 

Introduction to Education 2 

Philosophical and Sociological Founda- 
tions of Education 2 
Psychological Foundations of Education — 

Growth and Development 3 

Principles and Curricula of Secondary 

Schools 
Methods of Teaching Mathematics 
Observation and Student Teaching 12 



•Offered in cooperation with the School of Engineering. 



170 



Department of Mathematics 



♦Physics 225 
*Physics 226 

Psychology 320 

Psychology 436 
*Foreign language 

Math. Ill 

Math. 113 

Math. 221 

Math. 222 

Math. 224 

Math. 240 

Math. 242 
Math. 350 
Math. 505 
Math. 507 
Math. 511 
Math. 



College Physics I 4 

College Physics II 4 

General Psychology 3 

Tests and Measurements 3 

(French or German) 6 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3 

Introduction to the Programming 3 

of Digital Computers 

College Geometry 3 

Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory I 3 

Seminar in Mathematics 1 

Intermediate Analysis I 3 

Abstract Algebra I 3 

(3 hours beyond Math. 507) 3 



COURSES IN MATHEMATICS 

Undergraduate 

100. Intermediate Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3600) 
Elementary properties of the real number system, basic algebra through 
quadratics. Required of students who fail the mathematics entrance exami- 
nation. 



*101. Freshman Mathematics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3601) 
Axiomatic systems, algebraic structure of the real number system, basic 
algebra and trigonometry, introduction to analytic geometry and calculus. A 
passing score on the mathematics entrance examination. 



102. Freshman Mathematics II. 

(Formerly Math. 3602) 
Continuation of Mathematics 101. Prerequisite: Math. 



101. 



Credit 3(3-0) 



Credit 4(4-2) 



110. Preparatory Engineering Mathematics. 

(Formerly Math. 3610) 
Algebraic properties of the number systems, fundamental operations, ex- 
ponents and radicals, functions and graphs, solutions of equations and systems 
of equations, trigonometric functions and identities, inequalities logarithms, 
progressions, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, permutations and 
combination and determinants. Prerequisites: 1 unit of high school algebra 
and 1 unit of high school geometry. 



'General Education courses. 



Department of Mathematics 171 

*111. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3611) 
Elementary logic and the abstract nature of mathematics; structure of the 
real number system, polynomials and rational functions; linear systems and 
matrices, inequalities; sets, relations functions; trigonometric, logarithmic, 
expontential functions. Prerequisites: 1 Unit Plan Geometry and 2 Units of 
High School Algebra. 

112. Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors. Credit 4(4-0) 

Basic ideas and concepts of calculus. Methods and techniques in differential 
and integral calculus. Applications of calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102, 
110 or 111. No credit towards a degree in mathematics. 

*113. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3613) 
Analytic geometry of lines and circles; functions, limits and derivatives 
and applications, integrals and applications, infinite series, general analytic 
geometry of two and three dimension, functions of several variables, multi- 
ple integration, line and surface integral. Prerequisite: Math. Ill or Math. 
110. 



115. Mathematics of Business and Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 

.(Formerly Math. 3615) 
Simple interest, discount, partial payments, payroll, wages and commission 
accounts, discounts and mark-ups, retailing, taxes, distribution of ownership, 
transactions in corporate securities, insurance, compound interest, annuities, 
amortization and sinking funds. Prerequisites: Math. Ill or Math. 101, or 
Math. 110. 



116. Engineering Mathematics I. Credit 5(4-2) 

(Formerly Math. 3616) 
A review of the basic principles of preparatory engineering mathematics, 
analytic geometry of two and three space, differentiation coordinates, in- 
finite sequences and series, partial differentiation and multiple integrals. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 110 or two units algebra, one unit geometry, one- 
half unit trigonometry and a passing score on the placement examination. 



117. Engineering Mathematics II. Credit 5(4-2) 

(Formerly Math. 3617) 
Continuation of Math. 116. Prerequisite: Math. 116. 

221. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3621) 
Continuation of Math. 113. Prerequisite: 113. 



* General Education courses. 



172 Department of Mathematics 

222. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3622) 
Continuation of Math. 221. Prerequisite: 221. 



224. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3624) 

A general course covering fundamentals of statistics, central tendencies, 
variabilities, graphic methods, frequency distributions, correlations, reliability 
of measures, theory and methods of sampling, and the descriptive and analyti- 
cal measures of statistics. Prerequisites: Math. 111. 

240. Introduction to the Programming of Digital Computers. Credit3(2-2) 
(Formerly Math. 3641) 
Flow charts, machine language, eg., FORTRAN, preparation of cards and 
tapes, number systems, typical programs for solution on standard computers. 
Mathematical essentials for computer programming; e.g. approximation 
methods, error functions, iteration schemes, and numerical solutions of 
equations. Prerequisite: Math. Ill or 102, 110. 

242. College Geometry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3643) 
Postulational Systems. Euclid's Parallel Postulate. A brief study of non- 
Euclidean geometries. Euclidean Geometry as a special case of other geo- 
metries. Defects of Euclid's system. Prerequisite: High School Geometry and 
Math. 113 or Math. 116. 

300. Ordinary Differential Equations. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3645) 
Solution of linear n'th order equations, matrices and linear algebra, systems 
of linear differential equations, applications to mechanical vibrations and 
electrical circuits, power series solutions. Prerequisite: Math. 117 or Math. 
222. 

350. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3667) 
The algebra of matrices and its applications to the solution of systems of equa- 
tions. Vector spaces. The span of a family of vectors. Basis for a vector space. 
Changes of basis. Determinants and their applications. Different ways of eval- 
uating determinants. 

420. History of Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3620) 
A survey of the development of mathematics by chronological periods, with 
biographical references, illustrations of national and racial achievements, 
and discussion of the evolution of certain important topics of elementary 
mathematics. Prerequisite: Math. 221. 



Department of Mathematics 173 

423. Theory of Equations. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3623) 
Methods of solving cubics, quartics and other higher algebraic equations. 
Methods of approximating roots, systems of equations, elements of determi- 
nations. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

440. Numerical Methods. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Math. 3642) 
Study of numerical methods as related to programming techniques cover- 
ing the following topics, interpolation and extrapolation, approximate 
solutions of algebraic and transcendental equations, simultaneous linear 
equations initial-value, characteristic-value, and boundary-value problems, 
partial differential equations of the hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic types. 
Corequisite: Math. 240. 

500. Introduction to Applied Mathematics. Credit 4(4-0) 

Introduction to applied mathematics, Fourier series, Laplace transforms, 
line and surface integrals, introduction to partial differential equations, com- 
plex variables. Prerequisite: Math. 300. 

505. Seminar in Mathematics. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3660) 
Methods of preparing and presenting seminars, presentation of seminars 
in current developments in mathematics and/or topics of interest which are 
not included in formal courses. Required of mathematics majors. Prerequisite: 
Math. 507 or 511. 

507. Intermediate Analysis I Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3662) 

A rigorous treatment of the fundamental principles of analysis, limits, con- 
tinuity, sequences, series, differentiability and integrability and functions of 
several variables. Prerequisite: Math. 117 or Math. 222. 

508. Intermediate Analysis II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3663) 

Continuation of Math. 507. Prerequisite: Math. 507. 

511. Abstract Algebra I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3664) 

Elementary properties of sets, Peano axioms and the construction of the 
natural number system, properties of the integers, integral domains, groups, 
rings, fields, vector spaces, lattices and partially ordered sets. Prerequisite: 
Twenty hours of college mathematics. 

512. Abstract Algebra II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3665) 

Continuation of Math. 511. Prerequisite: Math. 511. 

520. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3668) 
Prerequisite: Math. 350. 



174 Department of Mathematics 

550. Vector Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3669) 
A study of the processes of vector analysis, with a treatment of the vector 
functions and operations as applied in theoretical work. Prerequisite: Math 
500. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary 

School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3670) 

Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and postulational systems, 
nature and methods of mathematical proofs, structure of the real number 
system. Open only to inservice teachers, or by permission of Department of 
Mathematics. 

601. Algebraic Equations for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3671) 

Algebra of sets, algebraic equations, systems of equations, matrices and 
determinants with applications and the elements of vector spaces. Prerequisite: 
Math. 600 or the consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

602. Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3672) 

Sets and mappings, properties of binary operations, groups, rings, integral 
domains, vector spaces and fields. Prerequisite: Math. 600 or the consent of 
the Department of Mathematics. 

603. Modern Analysis for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3673) 

Properties of the real number system, function, limits, sequencies, con- 
tinuity, differentiation and differentiability, integration and integrability. 
Prerequisite: Math. 600 or the consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3674) 

Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the 
Hilbert axioms, introduction to projective geometry, other non-euclidean 
geometries. Prerequisite: Math. 600 or the consent of the Department of 
Mathematics. 

606. Mathematics for Chemists. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3676) 

This course will review those principles of mathematics which are involved 
in chemical computations and derivations from general through physical 
chemistry. It will include a study of significant figures, methods of expressing 
large and small numbers, algebraic operations, trigonometric functions, and 
an introduction to calculus. 

607. Theory of Numbers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3677) 

Divisibility properties of the integers, Euclid algorithm, congruences, dio- 
phantine equations, number-theoretic functions, and continued fractions. 
Prerequisite: Twenty hours of college mathematics. 



Department of Mathematics 175 

608. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3678) 
Probability, mortality table, life insurance, annuities, endowments, computa- 
tion of net premiums, evaluation of policies, construction and use of tables. 
Prerequisite: Math. 224. 

620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3682) 
Operations on sets, relations, correspondences, comparison of sets, func- 
tions, ordered sets, general topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, con- 
nectivity, compactness, hormeomorphic spaces, general properties of T- 
spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

623. Advanced Probability and Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3683) 

Introduction to probability, distribution functions and movement-generating 
functions, frequency distribution of two variables, development of chisquare, 
student's "t" and "F" distributions. Prerequisite: Math. 224 and 117 or 222. 

624. Methods of Applied Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3684) 

Presents the bases of various statistical procedures. Applications of normal, 
binomial, Poisson, Chi-square, student's "t" and "F" distributions. Tests of 
hypotheses, power of tests, statistical inference, regression and correlation 
analysis and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Math. 224. 

625. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3685) 

This course provides background in number and counting concepts, bases, 
fundamental processes and a variety of applications to problem solving. This 
course cannot be sued to obtain credit toward a degree in mathematics. 

626. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Math. 625. Prerequisite: Math. 625. 

631. Linear and Non-Linear Programming. Credit 3(3-0) 

Optimization Subject to Linear Constraints; Transportation Problems; Sim- 
plex Method, Network Flows, Applications of Linear Programming to Industrial 
Problems and Economic Theory. Introduction to Non-Linear Programming. 
Prerequisite: Math 350 and consent of the instructor. 

632. Games and Queue Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

General Introduction to Game Theory; Two-Person-Zero-Sum-Games; 
Two-Person-Non-Zero-Sum-Non-Cooperative Games; Two-Person Co-Opera- 
tive Games; Reasonable Out-comes and Values; The minimax Theorem. In- 
troduction to Queuing Theory; Single Server Queuing Processes; Many Server 
Queuing Processes; Applications to economics and business. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 222 or Mathematics 117, Mathematics 224. 

651. Methods in Applied Mathematics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, transform 
calculus (Fourier, Laplace, Hankel, Mellin, etc. Transforms), higher order 
partial differential equations governing various physical phenomena, non- 
homogeneous boundary value problems, orthogonal expansions, Green's 
functions and variational principles. Prerequisite: Mathematics 300. 



176 



Department of Music 



652. Methods in Applied Mathematics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to integral equations and conversion of differential problems 
into integral equations of Volterra and Fredholm types, solution by iteration and 
other methods, existence theory, eigenvalue problems, Hibert-Schmidt theory 
of symmetric kernels and topics in the calculus of variation, including opti- 
mization of integrals involving functions of more than one variable, Hamilton's 
principles, Sturm-Liouville theory, Rayleigh-Ritz methods, etc. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 300. 



Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of them, 
see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

700. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3690) 

701. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3691) 

710. Theory of Functions of A Complex Variable I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3692) 

711. Theory of Functions of A Complex Variable II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3693) 

715. Projective Geometry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3694) 

717. Special Topics in Algebra. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3695) 

720. Special Topics in Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3696) 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



William T. McDaniel, Chairman 

The general objectives of the department of music are: (1) to enhance the 
cultural and aesthetic life of the university student through personal experi- 
ences in a well-directed program of education in music; (2) to provide the stu- 
dent with basic skills, techniques, pedagogical concepts, and perspective for a 
career as an artist and as a teacher of music on the elementary and secondary 
school levels; and (3) to interpret, create, and maintain the highest level in 
individual and group performance in music. The department of music currently 
offers two degree programs. One of these is a liberal arts curriculum leading 
to the bachelor of arts degree with a major in music. This degree program is 



Department of Music 177 

designed to accomodate students who wish to enter some area of music other 
than teaching. The other is a teacher-education curriculum leading to the 
bachelor of arts degree in music education. Students intending to teach in the 
public schools are strongly urged to follow this curriculum in order that they 
may meet certification requirements. 

Upon entrance into the music education program, each student must choose 
either an instrumental or a choral concentration. Those whose principal ap- 
plied music subject is either voice or piano should select the choral concen- 
tration; and those whose principal applied subject is an orchestral instrument 
should select the instrumental concentration. However, a student is not fully 
admitted to the teacher-education program until the end of the sophomore 
year. At this time his academic work and general prospects as a teacher are ex- 
amined by his department and the Teacher-Education Council. This is accom- 
plished in part through special inventories and tests of achievement. Upon 
acceptance, the student is permitted to enroll in upper level professional educa- 
tion courses. 

At the end of the four years, the student is again evaluated by his depart- 
ment and the Teacher Education Council to determine whether he has developed 
the competencies required of a teacher in his discipline. If the student is 
able to satisfy all exit criteria, he is then recommended for a teaching certifi- 
cate. More detailed information concerning entrance and exit requirements and 
procedures for the teacher-education program is available from the academic 
advisor. 

ACADEMIC COUNSELING 

Each student is assigned to a faculty member for counseling in matters of 
curriculum and related or personal problems as are appropriate. Students 
should consult regularly with the advisors to gain the benefits from their experi- 
ence. 

ADMISSION— RETENTION-EVALUATION 

For certified admission to the study of music as a major, the prospective 
music student must stand in a satisfactory manner: 

1. Auditions set by the faculty panel in his principal applied music area. 

2. Standardized tests consisting of the Wat kins- Far num. Performance Scale, 
the Seashore Tests of Musicality, and the entrance level Aliferis Test of 
Musical Achievement. 

To continue in the department of music, students must maintain a "C" 
average in all music courses. At the end of the sophomore year, the mid-point 
level Aliferis Test of Musical Achievement is administered and must be 
stood satisfactorily. 

Seniors are subjected to the Undergraduate Record, the Graduate Record, 
and the National Teacher Examinations to build a data base for evaluation 
of the music program. 



PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES 

Each student with a major in music is required to maintain continuous 
membership in an ensemble related to his principal performing medium. The 
student may elect the ensemble of his choice with no other restrictions. Par- 



178 Department of Music 

ticipation in more than a single ensemble is possible and encouraged as long 
as there are no schedule conflicts or violations of University policy concerning 
student course load. 



INSTRUMENTS AND PRACTICE FACILITIES 

Several small practice rooms are provided as practice facilities for students. 
Each room contains a piano which is tuned regularly and kept in good repair. 

With the exception of piano students, each music major or minor is re- 
quired to furnish an instrument for his personal use. University-owned instru- 
ments are primarily for the use of non-major student who serve in the instru- 
mental ensembles to complete the necessary instrumentation as need dictates. 
In as great a quantity as is possible, University-owned instruments will be 
provided for the instruction of music majors and minors in music education 
classes. 

RECITALS 

At least one solo performance on a regularly scheduled student recital is re- 
quired of all music majors during each semester in which the student is en- 
rolled in applied music. Such performances need not be given from memory. 
However, memory work is encouraged since the full public recital during the 
senior year must be performed from memory. Additional solo or chamber en- 
semble performances may be required by the applied music teacher as 
needed. 

The assignment of recital literature is done by the instructor. However, the 
student may make suggestions which may or may not be approved by the 
teacher. The student is required to purchase any and all music for recital pur- 
poses that may be specified by the instructor. 

All students should expect that the study of applied music will include the 
regular use of chamber music as well as solo literature. The department expects 
that all literature used for recital performance will be representative of the fin- 
est for the performing medium and that contemporary as well as older composi- 
tions will be included. 

Appearances for performance on recitals must be carried through on the 
date assigned. Postponement of a scheduled appearance is allowable only in 
emergencies and with the concurrance of both the instructor and the depart- 
ment chairman. Any postponed performance must be made up on a regularly 
scheduled student recital. Failure to appear will result in a failing grade for the 
recital performance which may have a seriously adverse effect on the grade for 
the course. 

Each performer is responsible for the selection and acquisition of an ac- 
companist who may be another student, a faculty member, or anyone com- 
petent to play the part. He is further responsible for arranging and maintaining 
a rehearsal schedule with the accompanist. Difficulty in finding an accom- 
panist should be brought to the attention of the department chairman as 
early as possible. 

Music majors are required to attend all recitals, concerts, and other music 
productions that are held on campus under the auspices of the music depart- 
ment or the university lyceum seris. A systemetic method for the checking and 
recording of attendance will be employed. Students, whether performers or 
spectators may not leave a performance prior to the conclusion of the program. 



Department of Music 179 

Concurrent with the last semester of applied music study and prior to the 
final examination period, each music major must perform a satisfactory public 
recital. The program of this performance should consist of the compositions 
studied during the previous semesters of applied music courses and must be 
performed entirely from memory. Each recital performance must be pre- 
viewed in its entirety and approved by the music faculty at least two weeks in 
advance of the proposed performance date. The performer is responsible for 
supplying printed programs, posters and/ or other advertisement for his recital. 
He is further responsible for the attendance of a representative audience at 
the performance. 

Since stage presence is also a part of the criteria on which all recital perform- 
ances are evaluated, the following points should be observed. 

1. Each performing student should plan to arrive one-half hour before recital 
time in order to tune his instrument, warm-up, or attend to details. Tune 
the instrument before the recital, not on stage. 

2. The recital is a dress-up occasion and should be reflected in the attire of 
each performer. 

3. In the absence of a printed program, each participant must announce 
titles and composers of selections in a loud, well-modulated voice and 
must give signal to the accompanist, by nodding of the head, when ready to 
perform. 

4. The correct posture and position of body and instrument must be ob- 
served at all times. The instructor should be consulted as to the best 
position for standing in relation to the piano. 

6. In bowing, wait for applause from the audience, then bow slowly from 
the waist in a relaxed manner. 

A failing grade on a recital does not necessarily mean a failing grade for the 
course, provided a performance was presented. More detailed information re- 
garding recitals is available from the applied music instructor. 

APPLIED MUSIC JURY EXAMINATIONS: 

An examination by a faculty committee of "Jury" is required of every stu- 
dent upon the completion of each semester of applied music. At these examina- 
tions, the student must display such competencies, skills, techniques, facility, 
musicianship, and repertoire as is required for his level. These requirements will 
have been made known to the student and submitted, in writing, to the de- 
partment at the beginning of the semester. More concise statements of these 
course requirements may be found in the Uqiversity bulletin in the section 
which describes the course offerings of the music department. 

A minimum level for an acceptable performance which has been previously 
established by the instructor must be attained to receive a passing grade on 
the examination. Jury examinations will be given either immediately before 
or during the regular final examination period. Attendance at these examina- 
tions will be subject to the same regulations as all other university finals. A 
failing grade will seriously jepoardize the successful completion of the course. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE APPLIED MUSIC JURY EXAMINATION ARE: 

(1) To serve as a final examination for each semester of study on the princi- 
pal instrument. 

(2) To safe-guard the integrity of the teacher and the interests of the stu- 
dent due to the highly subjective nature of the evaluation process. 



180 Department of Music 

(3) To insure that a satisfactory standard of performance is maintained. 

(4) To provide data that will aid in the counseling and guidance of stu- 
dents who have academic problems in the study of music. 

Such examinations are given individually to each student either during or 
immediately prior to the official period established for final examinations. The 
entire faculty of the department of music will sit as the jury for each student. 
Evaluations are made on a standardized rating sheet designed for each 
medium of performance. A record of each examination to which a student is 
subjected will be placed on file in his departmental folder. 

The jury will be concerned with the knowledge, understanding, skills, abil- 
ities, and attitudes as they relate to performance technique, musical inter- 
pretation, and general musicianship indicated in the teaching outlines for each 
course level. Evaluations are made on each student's performance of repre- 
sentative literature that he has studied during the current semester which ex- 
hibits his satisfaction of the objectives sought at that course level. The selec- 
tion of literature is critical since the performance in isolation of scales, 
arpeggios, ornaments, technical exercises, etc. is neither musical nor a credit- 
able basis for evaluation and thereby unsuitable for examination materials. 

he result of the jury examination will be weighed as one-fourth of the 
final grade. The remaining components of the final grade which are the recital 
performance and the weekly recitation during lessons will be weighed at one- 
fourth and one-half respectively. Each member of the faculty will tabulate the 
final grade for his applied music students. 

In keeping with university policy, the department of music seeks to avoid 
penalizing the promising student for faulty pre-college preparation due to the 
lack of opportunity. Upon the recommendation, of the teacher, a student who 
shows substantial progress and promise but who does not completely satisfy 
the objectives for a course level may pass the jury examination and the course 
with the stipulation that he repeat that level for more than the required num- 
ber of times. If however, a student is unable to matriculate in applied music at 
a normal rate by the end of the sophomore year, the department will request 
that he change to another discipline in which hev can enjoy greater success. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Choral Concentration 

I. Applied Music — 21 Semester Hours: 

100, (Diction)* 113, 213, 413, 513 (Principal Subject) 
114, 214 (Secondary Subject); 614 Choral Conducting 

II. Music Theory — 21 Semester Hours: 

101, 102, 200, 201, 400, 401, 402, 501 

III. Music History and Literature — 9 Semester Hours: 
403, 404, and 405 or 406 

IV. Music Education — 12 Semester Hours: 
424, 425, 426, Education 530, 531, 637 

V. Music Performance — 16 Semester Hours: 

301 (Eight Semesters); 307 Student Recital (Eight Semesters) 
Total Hours Required: 79 Semester Hours 



Department of Music 181 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Instrumental Concentration 

I. Applied Music — 21 Semester Hours: 

113, 213, 413, 513 (Principal Subject) 

114, 214 (Secondary Subject) 503 

II. Music Theory — 21 Semester Hours: 
101, 102, 200, 201, 400, 401, 402, 501 

III. Music History and Literature — 9 Semester Hours: 
403, 404, and 405 or 406 

IV. Music Education — 13 Semester Hours: 

424, 425, 426, 431, and Education 530, 532, 637 

V. Performance Organizations — 16 Semester Hours: 
300 (Eight Semesters), 307 (Eight Semesters) 

Total Number of Required Hours: 79 Semester Hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Applied Music Concentration 

I. Applied Music — 31 Semester Hours: 

113, 213, 413, 513, Principal Subject; and 114, 214 minor Subject; 503 
Score Reading and Conducting; 100 (Voice Students Only) 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Applied Music Concentration 

I. Applied Music — 31 Semester Hours: 

113, 213, 413, 513, Principal Subject; and 114, 214 minor Subject; 503 
Score Reading and Conducting; 100 (Voice Students On/ 
II. Music Theory — 23 Semester Hours: 
101, 102, 200, 201, 400, 401, 402, 501 

III. Music History and Literature — 10 Semester Hours: 

403, 404, 408, 412, (Wind and Percussion Students only) 409, 412 
(Piano Students only) 

IV. Music Performance — 20 Semester Hours: 
307 (Student Recital— Eight Semesters) 
Wind and Percussion: 

300 (Eight Semesters); and either 302, 303 or 304 (Four Semesters). 
Voice and Piano 

301(Six semesters); and either 305, 306, or 500 (four Semesters) 
V. Other — 3 Semester Hours 
618 Psychology of Music 
Total Required Hours — 84 Semester Hours 



"Instead of Music Diction, piano students should take 560— Accompanying during the junior year. 



182 Department of Music 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 
HISTORY AND LITERATURE CONCENTRATION 

I. Applied Music — 23 Semester Hours: 

113, 213, 413, 513 Principal Subject; 114, 214 Secondary Subject; 100 
(Voice Students Only); 503, Score Reading and Conducting; 450 (Ac- 
companying — piano Students only). 
II. Music Theory — 23 Semester Hours: 

101, 102, 119, 200, 201, 400, 401, 402, 501 

III. Music History and Literature — 18 Semester Hours: 
403, 404, 405, 406, 408, 410 and either 409, 411, or 412 

IV. 307 (Student Recital — Eight Semesters) 
V. Other — Eight Semesters Hours: 

618— Psychology of Music; English 210 and English 500 
Total Required Hours — 88 Semester Hours 



COURSES IN MUSIC THEORY 

101, 102. Theory I, II. Credit 3(2-2) Each Semester 

Review of the fundamentals of music, including the rudiments of music 
theory; construction and function of scales; intervals, triads and dominant 
seventh chords in root position and inversions; use of non harmonic tones; 
correlated analysis, rhythmic, melodic, harmonic, and key board drill. 

1 19. Sight Singing and Ear Training Credit 1(0-2) 

Fundamentals of musicianship; corrected rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic 
drills. 

201, 202. Theory III, IV. Credit 3(2-2) Each Semester 

Modulation, construction and function of seventh, ninth, eleventh, and thir- 
teenth chords in root position and inversions; chromatic harmony; advanced 
modulation; trends of the twnetieth century; corrected analysis, sightsinging, 
ear training, dictation, and keyboard drill. Prerequisites: 101, 102. 

400, 401. Counterpoint I, II. Credit 2(2-0) Each Semester 

Strict counterpoint in two or more parts; imitation; two and three-part in- 
ventions; canon; forms based on the chorale; invertible counterpoint; the 
fugue. Prerequisites: 200, 201. 

402. Form Analysis. Credit 2(1-2) 

Harmonic and melodic structure of the phrase; phrases in combination; the 
analytical methods; theme and variation, ternary, rondo, binary, sonata, con- 
certo and unique forms; the fugue and related genres. Prerequisites: 202, 400. 

501. Arranging Credit 3(2-2) 

Scoring for chorus, band, orchestra, vocal and instrumental chamber en- 
sembles. Prerequisites: 400, 401. 



Department of Music 183 

COURSES IN MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

216. Music Appreciation I. Credit 3(3-0) Each Semester 

A study of melody, harmony, rhythm, simple forms, vocal music, texture and 
the orchestra. Designed for the general student to provide an introductory 
survey to the art of music. 

217. Music Appreciation II. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the literature and styles of the several periods of music history 
from antiquity through the present. Designed for the general student as a 
continuation of Music Appreciation I. Prerequisite: Music 216. 

218. Introduction to Music Literature. Credit 2(2-0) 

Familiarization of student with large body of musical material from all 
branches of musical writing; for vocal and instrumental, solo and ensemble, 
symphonic and choral groups. Special attention is given to style and struc- 
tural procedures by principal composers. Designed for students with some 
musical background. 

403. History and Literature of Music I. Credit 3(2-2) 

Analysis of main works of music literature presented in historical order; form, 
harmonic, and contrapuntal devices, orchestration, and other stylistic fea- 
tures investigated against the background of historic artistic and cultural 
developments; Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Pre- 
requisites: 101, 102. 

404. History and Literature of Music II. Credit 3(2-2) 

Analysis of main works of music literature presented in historical order; 
form, harmonic and contrapuntal devices, orchestration, and other stylistic fea- 
tures investigated against the background of historic, artistic, and cultural 
development; Classical, romantic, Postromantic and contemporary periods. 
Prerequisite: 403. 

405. Music of the Baroque Period. Credit 2(1-2) 

Analysis of the main works of the principal composers of the early, middle, 
and late Baroque periods culminating with a more detailed study of the works 
of Handel and J.S. Bach; vocal, keyboard and other instrumental forms in- 
cluded; emphasis on stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: 403 

406. Music of the Romantic Period. Credit 2(1-2) 

Intensive study of the works of the principal composers of the Romantic 
era; emphasis on general and individual stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: 

404. 

407. Modern Music from 1890 to the Present Credit 2(1-2) 

Music of the so-called Viennese school of the twentieth century against the 
background of late German romanticism and French impressionism; the dissolu- 



184 Department of Music 

tion of the tonal system and the development of the serial principle; the music 
of Bartok, Stravinsky and others in the light of nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
tury investigations of folk or national materials and their influence upon seri- 
ous artists; the relationship of Bartok and Stravinsky to traditional harmonic 
principles and to the formal structures of the past; other trends in the twentieth 
century. Prerequisites: 201, 404. 

408. The Symphony Credit 2(1-2) 

The formulation of classical principles of construction by Josef Haydn, with 
reference to the contributions of Gluck, C.P.E. Bach and the Manheim school; 
the fulfillment of the classical ideal of the works of Mozart and Beethoven; 
changing concepts of the symphony after Beethoven; the Romanticists apprach 
to form; study of the major Romantic symphonies by composers from Shubert 
to Mahler. Prerequisites: 201, 404. 

409. Keyboard Music. Credit 2(1-2) 

Techniques, musicianship, and stylistic aspects of interpretation; from pre- 
Bach to the present; intellectual, emotional, and imaginative aspects of per- 
formance as exemplified by works from leading composers including Bach, 
Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy, and Moussorgsky; all lec- 
tures illustrated at the piano. Prerequisite: 404. 

410. Opera. Credit 2(1-2) 

Establishment of the opera as a feasible musico-dramatic genre and the 
various solutions to problems of the opera as suggested by composers from the 
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries; special emphasis on the works of 
Monteverdi, Scarlatti, Gluck, Mozart, Wagner, and Verdi. Prerequisites: 201, 
404. 

411. The Art Song. Credit 2(1-2) 

Survey of the art song from seventeenth century Italy to present, with spe- 
cial emphasis on the song literatures of Germany, France, and contemporary 
America; practice in interpretation with particular attention to style and dic- 
tion. Prerequisite. 404. 

412. Chamber Music. Credit 2(1-2) 

Analysis of masterworks of chamber literature for instrumental and vocal 
ensembles by the main composers for each of the several periods in music 
history; interpretation. Prerequisite: 404. 



COURSES IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

424. Percussion Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

Playing of percussion instruments; basic techniques of snare drum, timpani, 
xylophone, bells, chimes, and other percussion instruments are presented and 
precticed. 

425. Woodwind Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

Playing of woodwind instruments; basic techniques for clarinet, flute, oboe, 
saxophone, and bassoon are presented and practiced. 



Department of Music 185 

426. Brasswind Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

Playing of brasswind instruments; basic techniques for trumpet, French 
horn, Trombone, Euphonium and Tuba are presented and practiced. 

427. Voice Class Credit 1(0-2) 

Use of the singing voice; basic principles of singing, interpretation and 
musicianship; physiology, breathing; tone production, resonance and diction; 
application of basic principles to singing voice; pronunciation, articulation, in- 
tonation, attack, legato, sostenuto, flexibility and dynamics; ensemble sing- 
ing; techniques for producing choral tone in accompanied and unaccompanied 
styles, choral procedure and repertoire. 



PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS 

The total numbers of semester hours to be earned through performance or- 
ganization courses is specified in the outlines of major curricula. Every music 
major is required to perform in one of the two major organizations (band or 
choir). If the principal applied subject is a wind or percussion instrument, the 
student must elect band; if the principal applied subject is voice or piano, the 
student must elect choir. The organization elected must be repeated each 
semester as specified until the required number of semester hours has been 
earned. Other performance organization courses are elected as required by the 
several curricula and similarly repeated for credit until the necessary semester 
hours have been earned. 

300. University Band. Credit 2(0-5) 

The University Marching Band is organized in the fall of the year (first semes- 
ter) and plays for all football games. It is open to all qualified students, both 
men and women. The Symphony Band functions after the bootball season and 
continues for the rest of the year. Membership in both the Symphony and 
Marching Bands through audition with the Director of Bands. May be repeated 
for credit each semester. 

301. University Choir. Credit 2(0-4) 

An organization designed to perform a wide range of compositions written 
for mixed voices representing various musical styles and periods. Numerous 
appearances throughout the year on campus and for various churches and civic 
organizations. Tours are planned annually for the southeastern, eastern, and 
midwestern regions of the country. Membership is open to all qualified stu- 
dents, both men and women through audition with the director. May be re- 
peated for credit each semester. 

302. Brass Ensemble. Credit 1(0-2) 

The study and performance of literature for brass instrument chamber groups 
from all periods of music history and in all styles. Frequent public concerts. 
Membership is open to all qualified students, both men and women through 
audition with the director. May be repeated for credit each semester. 



186 Department of Music 

303. Woodwind Ensemble. Credit 1(0-2) 

The study and performance of literature for woodwind chamber music his- 
tory and in all styles. Frequent public concerts. Membership is open to all quali- 
fied students, both men and women through audition with the director. May 
be repeated for credit each semester. 

304. Percussion Ensemble Credit 1(0-2) 

The study and performance of literature for percussion chamber groups re- 
presenting a wide variety of styles. Designed to develop skill in ensemble per- 
formance on all of the instruments of percussion used in this growing modern 
repertoire, membership is open to all qualified students, both men and women 
through audition with the director. Frequent public concerts. May be re- 
peated for credit each semester. 

305. Opera Workshop. Credit 1(0-2) 

Musical and dramatic group study and performance of excerpts from the 
operatic repertoire. Includes an annual production of a standard opera and/ or 
contemporary chamber work, with staging, costumes, and scenery. Students 
must secure the approval of their university voice instructor before enrolling. 
May be repeated for credit each semester. 

306. Male Singers. Credit 1(0-2) 

A choral organization designed to perform a wide range of compositions 
written for men's voices and representing various musical styles and periods. 
Frequent public concerts. Membership is open to all qualified male students 
through audition with the director. May be repeated for credit each semester. 

307. Student Recital. Credit 0(0-1) 

A weekly assembly of music students with members of the faculty, provid- 
ing opportunity for experience in public performance before an audience, lec- 
ture and discussion of problems in the general area of performance includ- 
ing ensemble playing and singing, conducting, accompanying, stage depart- 
ment, also performance. (Required of all music majors during each semester 
of residence; a grade of pass (P) or fail (F) will be assigned on the basis of 
participation and attendance). 



APPLIED MUSIC 

503. Score Reading and Conducting Credit 2(1-2) 

Fundamental conducting beat patterns, size of beats, and use of each hand; 
discussion and study of musical terminology; conducting experience with 
laboratory group. Transposition; characteristics and ranges of instruments; 
study of tempos and dynamics; continued conducting experience with both 
choral and instrumental laboratory groups. 

Individual instruction is available in the following branches of applied 
music at both principal and secondary areas of study. 



Piano 


Flute 


Bassoon 


Trombone 


Voice 


Oboe 


French Horn 


Baritone Horn 


Percussion 


Clarinet 


Trumpet 


Tuba 



Department of Music 187 

In the principal area of performance, each student receives a one hour in- 
dividual lesson each week and must practice for at least (2) hours each day 
to earn two semester hours credit. To earn three semester hours credit, the 
student must practice a minimum of three hours each day in addition to his 
lesson. In the secondary area of performance, each student receives a one 
hour lesson each week and is required to practice a minimum of one hour each 
day to earn one semester hour credit. To earn two semester hours credit each 
student must practice a minimum of two hours each day in addition to his lesson. 

Music 114. Applied Music Secondary. Credit 1(0-1) 

Semi-private or class study on a secondary instrument. Students whose 
principal performing medium is voice or one of the orchestral instruments are 
required to study the piano as the secondary instrument. Students whose prin- 
ciple performing medium is the piano may choose either voice or an orchestral 
instrument as the secondary instrument. Piano students pursuing the music 
education curriculum with a choral concentration must study voice as the 
secondary applied area. Emphasis is placed on the development of sound basic 
performance technique. May be repeated for credit. Two semesters are required. 

Music 214. Applied Music Secondary. Credit 1(0-1) 

Continued development of basic performance skills that were began in 
music 114. Attention will be given to preparation for the comprehensive ex- 
amination on the secondary instrument required of all students. 

PIANO 

Requirements for Admission — The applicants who elect piano as their prin- 
cipal instrument should be able to play all major and minor scales and arpeggi 
at a moderate tempo. They should play with technical ease and musical under- 
standing, compositions equivalent in difficulty to the following: Clementi, 
Sonatina, Op. 36, No. 6: Mozart. Fantasie in D. Minor, Bach, Little Preludes, or 
Burgmuller, Studies, Op. 100. 

113. A three-part invention by Bach. A movement of a Sonata by Haydn, 
Mozart, or Beethoven. Work of moderate difficulty by a Romantic composer. 
Scales and arpeggios in parallel or contrary motion at a moderately rapid 
tempo. Sight reading. 

213. A prelude and fugue from the Well-Tempered Calavier by Bach, Comple- 
tion of the Sonata started in 113. A work from the Romantic school. A work 
written since 1900. Scales and arpeggios at rapid tempo. Sight reading. 

413. Dance forms from French suites or parties by Bach. A sonata by Haydn, 
Mozart or Beethoven, one movement memorized. A work from the Romantic 
School. A contemporary work. Sight reading. 

513. A prelude and fugue from the Well-Tempered Calavier by Bach, a sonata 
by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven, one movement memorized. 

560. Credit 2(0-4) 

Analysis and practice in piano accompanying of singers and instrumentalists; 
sight reading and transposition; discussion of style and performance; experi- 
ence in public performance. May be repeated for credit each semester. Pre- 
requisite: Consent of instructor. 



188 Department of Music 

VOICE 

Requirements for Admission — The applicant should give evidence of ability 
to sing simple standard or classic art songs adequate tone quality and intona- 
tion. Some knowledge of piano is highly desirable. 

100. Diction for Singers. Credit 1(0-2) 

A course designed to familiarize students with the pronunciation of English, 
Italian, German, and French through the study and use of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. 

113. 1) Competencies: Correct posture, breathing habits, phrasing, various 
five-note scales, diction. 

2) Studies: Simple English and Italian art songs, folk songs, spirituals. 

3) Solos: Six songs in English and Italian to be memorized each semester. 
Representative composers: Scarlatti, Handel, Purcell. 

213. 1) Comptencies: Correct posture, breathing habits, phrasing, diction, 
scales and arpeggios. 

2) Studies: English and Italian art songs, German art songs, folk songs, 
spirituals. 

3) Solos: Eight songs in English, Italian, and German to be memorized each 
semester. Representative composers: Durante, Scarlatti, Schumann. 

413. 1) Competencies: Continuation of 213. 

2) Studies: English and Italian art songs, German songs, French art songs, 
folk songs and spirituals. 

3) Solos: Nine songs in English, Italian, German, and French to be memor- 
ized each semester. Representative composers: Schumann, Schubert, 
Strauss, Faure, Britten, Mozart. 

513. 1) Competencies: Continuation of 413 with emphasis on preparation for 
senior recital. 

2) Studies: Continuation of 413 with more intricate scales and arpeggios. 

3) Solos: 10 songs in English, German, Italian and French to be memorized. 
Representative composers: Wolf, Schumann, Faure, Verdi, Britten, Han- 
del, Debussy. 

427. Voice Class. Credit 1(0-2) 

Use of the singing voice; basic principles of singing, interpretation and musi- 
cianship; psychology, breathing; tone production, resonance and diction; appli- 
cation of basic principles to singing voice; pronunciation, articulation, intona- 
tion, attack, legato, sostenuto, flexibility and dynamics; ensemble singing; 
technique for producing choral tone in accompanied and unaccompanied 
styles; choral procedure and repertoire. 

PERCUSSION 

Requirements for Admission: The candidate shall demonstrate satisfactory 
performing ability in at least one of the following areas of percussion. 

Performance: Snare drum, Xylophone, marimba and timpani. These com- 
petencies will include: 

1. The ability to perform a solo. 

2. The ability to perform an excerpt from a book in which the applicant has 
studied that will demonstrate musicianship and technical skill. 

3. The ability to play at sight representative literature which is characteris- 
tic of the instrument. 



Department of Music 189 

4. Previous ensemble experience in band and/or orchestra. Additional com- 
petencies for snare drum: 

1. Basic knowledge of rudiments. 

2. The performance of a Sawa march or the equivalent. 

Additional competencies for xylophone marimba: 

The ability to play major scales through 4 flats and 4 sharps in one octave. 

Additional competencies for timpani: 

1. Basic knowledge of timpani techniques. 

2. A thorough knowledge of range of each timpano. 

113,213. Competencies: (a) Snare Drum; Fundamentals, military techniques, 
reading and control. 

Mallets: Fundamentals, reading technique — musical orientation. 

Studies: Price, Beginning Snare Drum; Goldenberg, Mallet In- 
struments; Stone, Stack Control; Bower, Drum Method; Gardner, 
Modern Method, Book I, Stone, Mallet Control. 

Solos: Wilcaxon, Rudimental Solos; Price, Exhibition Drum Solo; 
Colgrass, Advanced Snare Drum Solo; Brever Easy — Medium Mallet 
Solos; Stone, Military Drum Beats. 

413, 513. Competencies: (a) Snare Drum; Fine control, orchestra techniques, 
(b) Mallets; Reading, advanced techniques, tambourine, castanets, 
brass drum, and cymbals, (c) Timpani: Kettle technique, tuning ex- 
ercises and control, (d) Latin-American Instruments.: (e) Percussion, 
"Trap" techniques, tambourine, castanets, brass drum, and cym- 
bals. Basic skills on each. 

Studies: Price, Techniques and Exercises for Triangle, Tambourine 
and Castanets; Brewer, Daily Studies; Goldenberg, Mallet Instru- 
ments. Goodman, Timpani Method; Fresia, Timpani Method; Tourte, 
Snare Drum Technique; Gardner, Modern Method, Book II, Mallets; 
Chopin, Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer. 

Solos: McKenzie, Graded Timpani Solos; Britton, Timpani Solo; 
Hart, Timpani Solos; Price, Unaccompanied Timpani Solos; Brewer, 
3 and 4 Mallet Solos, Quick 3 and 4 Mallet Solos; Stone Rudimental 
Drum Solos; Duets and Quintets. 

WIND INSTRUMENTS 

Requirements for Admission: The candidate shall show evidence: 

1. Basic development in embouchure and articulation. 

2. Knowledge of fingering and alternates. 

3. Satisfactory tone quality and control. 

4. Ability to play major scales through 4 flats and 4 sharps, in eight notes 
(M.M.d-72) and the chromatic scale both slurred and articulated. 

5. Minimum — Two octave range. 

6. Ability to play a simple song demonstrating musicianship which includes 
phrasing and expression. 

7. Previous study in the equivalent of the Rubank Advanced Method. 

8. Previous ensemble experience in band and/ or orchestra. 

9. Ability to play at sight representative literature which is characteristic of 
the instrument. 



190 Department of Music 

TRUMPET 

113, 213. Competencies: Breathing; elementary embrouchure and tone pro- 
duction; tonguing as applied to various instruments; coordination 
of tone production habits through progressive major and minor 
scales; practical problems of artistic performance. 

Studies: Cornet and Trumpet — Complete teaching for cornet — Beeler, 
Walter Boosey and Hawkins; 1952, Second Book of Practical Studies 
for Cornet and Trumpet — Robert Getchell; Hovey, Nilo, Belwin, 
Inc. 1948. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC — Music Educator's National Con- 
ference. 

413, 513. Competencies: Intonation; embouchure techniques; breath control 
and tone quality; articulation; reading; style; performance tech- 
niques. 

Studies: Ruband Advance Method: 

Literature: Selected from NIMCA — Music Educator's National 
Conference. 

FRENCH HORN 

113, 213. Competencies: Breathing, embouchure and tone production; ton- 
guing; progressive major and minor scale technique; practical 
problems of artistic performance. 

Studies: Rubank, Intermediate Method for French Horn; Modern 
Pares Foundation. 

Studies: Whistler, Daily Exercises for French Horn, Pottag. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC — Music Educator's National Con- 
ference. 

413, 513. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques, breath control 
and tone quality; articulations; reading; style; performance tech- 
niques. 

Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for French Horn. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC — Music Educator's National Con- 
ference. 

TROMBONE— BARITONE 

1 13, 213. Competencies: Breathing, elementary embouchure and tone produc- 
tion; tonguing as applied to various instruments; coordination of 
tone production habits through progressive major and minor scales; 
practical problems of artistic performances. 

Studies: Trombone and Baritone 

Arbans-Prescott Method for Trombone-Baritone — Carl Fisher, Inc. 
Rubank Intermediate Method for Trombone-Baritone. Skornicka and 
Boltz, Rubank, Rubank, Inc. Modern Pares Foundation. Studies for 
Trombone and Baritone — Whistler. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC — Music Educator's National Con- 
ference. 



Department of Music 191 

413, 513. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques; breath control 
and tone quality; articulations, reading; style; performance tech- 
niques. 

Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for Trombone and Baritone. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC — Music Educator's National Con- 
ference. 



TUBA 

113, 213. Competencies: Breathing, elementary embouchure and tone produc- 
tion; tonguing as applied to various instruments; coordination of 
tone production habits through progressive major and minor 
scales; practical problems of artistic performances. 

Studies: Tuba 

Rubank Intermediate Method for Brass — Skornicka and Boltz. Ru- 
bank, Inc. First Book of Practical Studies for Tuba — Hovey N. Bel- 
win, Inc. Vandercook Etudes for Bass — Rubank, Inc. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC list Music Educator's National 
Conference. 

413, 513. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques; breath control 
and tone quality; articulation; reading; style; performance tech- 
niques. 

Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for Tuba. 

Literature: Selected from NIMAC list— Music Educator's Nationa; 
Conference. 

FLUTE 

113. Level I: Competencies: Major and Minor Scales through 5 sharps and 5 
flats. Emphasis on fingering and tonal development. 

Studies: Soussmann, Complete Method for Flute; Anderson, 24 Pro- 
gressive Studies, Op. 33. 

Literature: Bizet, Minuet; Mozart, Adagio. 

213. Level II: Competencies: All Major and Minor Scales throughout the 
practical performing range. Emphasis on sight reading. 

Studies: Caually, Melodious and Progressive Studies for Flute 
Soussmann. 

Literature: Bach, Suite in B. Minor; Handel, Sonatas. 

413. Level III: Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on perform- 
ing literature. 

Studies: Soussman — Moyse, Flute Studies. 

Literature: Bach, Sonatas; Debussy, Syrinx. 

513. Level IV: Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. 

Studies: Schmitd, Orchestral Studies. 

Literature: Chaminade, Concertino, Hindemith, Sonata. 



192 Department of Music 

OBOE 

113. Competencies: Major and Minor Scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. 

EEmphasis on fingering and tonal development. 

Studies: Ferling, 144 Preludes and Studies; Barrett, Complete Method 
for Oboe. 

Literature: Franck, Piece V; Piece in G. Minor. 

213. Competencies: All Major and Minor Scales throughout the prac- 

tical performing range. Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjust- 
ment. 

Studies: Barret, Method: Tustin, Technical Studies. 

Literature: Schumann, Three Romances: Telemann; Concerto in 

F Minor. 

413. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing 

literature. Reed Making. 

Studies: Tustin, Studies; Prestin. 

Literature: Handel, Sonata in G. Minor. Goosens, Concerto. 

513. Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. 

Studies: Orchestral Literature. 

CLARINET 

113. Competencies: Major and Minor Scales through 5 sharps and 5 

flats. Emphasis on fingerings and tonal development. 

Studies: Klose Celebrated Method for Clarinet and Rose 32 Etudes. 

Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature for the Clarinet, Vol. II. 

213. Competencies: All Major and Minor Scales throughout the practical 

performing range. Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment. 

Studies: Klose, Rose 40 Etudes. 

Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature, Vols. I and II. 

413. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing 

literature. 

Studies: Baermann, Method for Clarinet; Jean Jean, 18 Etudes de 
Perfectionnemen. 

Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature, Vol III (The Concertos) 

513. Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. 

Studies: Baermann; Jean Jean; Orchestral Studies. 

Literature: Bernstein, Sonata; Debussy, Rapsodie. 

SAXOPHONE 

113. Competencies: Major and Minor Scales through 5 sharps and 5 

flats. Emphasis on fingerings and tonal development. 

Studies: DeVille, Universal Method; Endrejen, Supplementary 
Studies. 

Literature: Benson, Cantilena; Gretchaninof, Phantasme. 



Department of Music 193 

213. Competencies: All Major and Minor Scales through the practical 

performing range. Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment. 

Studies: DeVille; Rascher, Top Tones for Saxophone. 

Literature: Bozza, Aria, Casadesus, Romance. 

413. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing 

literature. Introduction to jazz improvising. 

Studies: DeVille; Rascher, 158 Saxophone Exercises. 

Literature: Creston, Sonata; Debussy, Rapsodie, Fasch, Sonata; 
Music Minus one Saxophone. 

513. Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. 

Studies: Traler-Lazarus, Virtuoso Studies. 

Literature: Bozza, Scaramouche. 

BASSOON 

113. Competencies: Major and Minor Scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. 

Emphasis on fingerings and tonal development. 

Studies: McDowell, Practical Studies, Bk. I; Kovar, 24 Daily Ex- 
ercises; Wessenborn, Practical Method Bassoon. 

Literature: Bakalenikoff, Three Pieces; Weinberger, Sonatine. 

213. Competencies: All Major and Minor Scales throughout the prac- 

tical playing range. Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment 
and making. 

Studies: Wesseborn, Method for Bassoon; Kovar, 24 Daily Exercises; 
McDowell, Practical Studies, Bk. II. 

Rep. Literature: Telemann, Sonata in F Minor, Weber, Concerto in F 
(Slow Movement). 

413. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing 

literature. 

Studies: Pierne, Concert Piece; Galliard, Sonatas; Mozart, Con- 
certo. 

510. Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. Or- 

chestral Studies. 

Studies: Orchestra Passages 

Literature: Hindemith, Sonata 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

609. Music in Early Childhood. Credit 3(2-2) 

A conceptual approach to the understanding of musical elements; and under- 
standing of the basic activities in music in early childhood; modern trends in 
music education; Kodaly and Orff methods. 



194 Department of Physics 

610. Music in Elementary School Today. Credit 3(2-2) 

Music in the elementary school curriculum; creating a musical environment 
in the classroom; child voice in singing, selection and presentation of rote 
songs; development of rhythmic and melodic expressions; directed listening; 
experimentation with percussion and simple melodic instruments; criteria for 
utilization of notational elements; analysis of instrumental materials. 

611. Music in The Secondary School Today Credit 3(3-0) 

Techniques of vocal and instrumental music instruction in the junior and 
senior high schools; the general music class; the organization, administra- 
tion and supervision of music programs, as well as music in the humanities. 
This course includes the adolescent's voice and its care; the testing and classi- 
fication of voices; operetta production; the instrumental program; and train- 
ing glee clubs, choirs, bands, and instrumental ensembles. 

614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups. Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal techniques; balance, blend and relationship of parts to the total 
ensemble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in 
school at all levels of ability; conducting experience with laboratory group. 

616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups. Credit 2(0-4) 

Rehearsal techniques; balance, blend and relationship of parts to the total 
ensemble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in 
school groups at all levels of ability; conducting experience with laboratory 
group. 

618. Psychology of Music. Credit 3(2-2) 

The study of the physical and psychological properties fo musical sounds and 
the responses of the human organism to musical stimuli. The principles devel- 
oped are applied to various field of applied psychology such as the learning of 
musical skills, Therapeutic uses of music, and the use of music in industry to 
improve production. 

620. Advanced Music Appriciation. Credit 3(2-2) 

Analytic studies of larger forms from all branches of music writing; Special 
emphasis on style and structural procedures by principal composers; works 
taken from all periods in music history. Designed for students with previous 
study of music appreciation. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Jason Gilchrist, Chairman 
The specific objectives of the department are as follows: 

1. To prepare majors for graduate study and careers in Physics, medicine 
and other professional fields. 

2. To pepare majors for work in research and development laboratories. 



Department of Physics 195 

3. To prepare majors to teach physics and mathematics in high school, and to 
also have conpetency in chemistry and biology. 

4. To provide majors in other departments with a clear understanding of 
the laws of physics and their applications. 

5. To provide all students with the ability to make meaningful observations, 
to convert these observations into mathematical language, and to reach 
logical conclusions. 

Three options in physics are provided for our majors. The professional option 
is designed to prepare students for further study in physics or careers in areas 
such as business, dentistry, environmental science, law, medicine, or science 
writing for which a basic background in physics may be desired. The engineer- 
ing option is for students who plan to begin work with a bachelors degree. 
The teaching option is designed for students who plan to teach in high school. 



Professional Option Program 

The required physics courses in the professional option curriculum are: 
Physics 221, 222, 231, 232, 400, 401, 402, 403, 406, 420, 421, 555, 556, 600, 603, 
604, 605, 606. 

Other required courses include chemistry 101, 102, 111, and 112; mathe- 
matics 116, 117, 240, 300, 500. Two semesters of French, German or Russian 
are also required. 

A student can complete requirements for a professional physics degree and 
also fulfill requirements for admission to medical school by taking the follow- 
ing courses as electives; biology 160, 140, 260, and chemistry 221, 222. Many 
medical schools will also accept students after the completion of the third year 
of study. 



Engineering Physics Option Program 

The required physics courses in the engineering physics curriculum are: 
physics 221, 222, 231, 232, 400, 402, 403, 406, 420, 421, 555, 556. Two addi- 
tional physics courses are also required. 

Other required courses include chemistry 101, 102, 111, 112; mathematics 116, 
117, 240, 300, 500; mechanical engineering 101, 200, 335, 337, 361; electrical 
engineering 337, 452. 



Teaching Option Program 

The required physics courses in the teaching option curriculum are: physics 
221, 222, 231, 400, 403, 406, 420, 421, 557. Two additional elective physics 
courses are also required. 

Other required courses include chemistry 101, 102, 111, 112; mathematics 
111, 113, 221, 222, 240, 300; biology 140, 160. 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 


Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 




2 


1 




3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


2 




14 
Sophomore Year 


16 



196 Department of Physics 

ENGINEERING PHYSICS OPTION 
Suggested Schedule of Courses 



Course and Number 

Physics 221 

Physics 231 

Physics 102 

English 100, 101 

Mathematics 116, 117 

History 100, 101 

Engineering Graphics 101 

« 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 4 

Physics 222 3 — 

Physics 232 2 — 

Mathematics 240 — 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 3 3 

Chemistry 111 Lab, 112 Lab 1 1 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

M.E. 200 ^ _3_ 

16 17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 400, 402 3 3 

Physics 403 — 3 

Humanities — social studies 3 — 

M.E. 335, 337 3 3 

Physics 406 3 — 

Electives in physics — 3 

E.E. 337, 452 _J_ _4_ 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Electives, free 3 6 

Physics 555, 556 3 3 

Physics 420, 421 1 1 

M.E. 361 — 2 

Electives in physics 3 — 

Electives in engineering 4 3 

Humanities — social studies 3 — 

17 15 



Department of Physics 



197 



PROFESSIONAL OPTION 



Suggested Schedule of Courses 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Physics 102 1 

English 102 1 

English 100, 101 3 

Physics 221, 222 3 

Physics 231, 232 2 

Math 116, 117 5 

History 100 — 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
3 
2 
5 
_3 
16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

History 101 3 — 

Humanities 200 — 3 

Math 300, 500 4 4 

Physics 406 — 3 

Math 240 3 — 

Chemistry 101, 102 3 3 

Chemistry 111, 112 1 1 

Physics 400, 600 _3_ _3 

17 17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 201 3 

Physics 555, 556 3 

Physics 403, 603 3 

Physics 420, 421 1 

Physics 401 3 

Electives _3_ 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
5 

1 

_6_ 
15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 605, 606 3 3 

French, German or Russian 3 3 

Physics 402 3 — 

Electives __6_ _7_ 

15 13 



198 Department of Physics 

TEACHING OPTION 
Suggested Schedule of Courses 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 3 3 

Chemistry 111 Lab, 112 Lab 1 1 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Physics 102 _J_ —_ 

17 16 



Course and Number 

Psychology 320 

Education 300 

Humanities 200, 201 . 
Mathematics 221, 222 

Physics 221, 222 

Physics 231, 232 

English 250 

Health Education 200 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 


Spa 


ng Semester 
Credit 




2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 






2 


17 


16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 300 4 — 

Physics 400, 403 3 3 

Physics 406 3 — 

Physics 420, 421 1 1 

Education 301, 400 2 3 

Biology 140 — 4 

Electives — 6 

Biology 160 _4 — 

17 17 



Department of Physics 



199 



Course and Number 
Education 560 . . . 
Education 500 . . . 

Physics 557 

Education 436 . . . 
Education 535 . . . 
Physics electives 
Mathematics 240 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 


Spri 


ng Semester 
Credit 
6 




3 


3 




3 






3 


6 




3 




15 


12 



COURSES IN PHYSICS 

*101. Introduction To Astronomy. Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamentals of astronomy with emphasis on methods of observation and 
the solar system. Astronomical instruments, including optical and radio tele- 
scopes. The nature of the sun, moon, planets and other objects of the solar 
system. 

102. Physics Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

Lectures, seminars and laboratory demonstrations. Orientation to the Physics 
Department. Presentation of selected topics, student participation and dis- 
cussions. 

*200. Introductory Physics. Credit 2(2-0) 

A non-laboratory course involving the study of mechanics, heat, electricity, 
wave motion, and atomic and nuclear phenomena. Recommended for students 
with poor high school preparation in physics who should prepare for College 
Physics or General Physics. 

201. Survey of Physics. Credit 3(2-2) 

A one-semester study of selected topics in physics including simple ma- 
chines, heat, sound, electricity, and light. Prerequisite: Math 111 or 102. 



"211. Technical Physics I. 



Credit 3(4-0) 



A study of basic principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. 
Emphasis is placed on applications of physics in modern technology. Pre- 
requisites: Math 111. Corequisite: Math 112, and Physics 216. 

212. Technical Physics II. Credit 3(4-0) 

A continuation of Physics 211. Magnetism, electricity, light, and modern 
physics. Prerequisite: Physics 211, corequisite: Physics 217. 

216. Technical Physics I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 

A qualitative and quantitative study of certain physics systems; critical 
observations and codification of data are emphasized. Corequisite: Physics 
211. 



200 Department of Physics 

217. Technical Physics II Laboratory. Credits 1(0-2) 

A continuation of Physics 216. Corequisite: Physics 212. 

*221. General Physics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3821) 

A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics, heat, electromagnetism, 
wave motion, sound, light and modern physics. Calculus used. Corequisite: 
Math 117 or 221, Physics 231. 

*222. General Physics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3822) 

A continuation of Physics 221. Prerequisite: Physics 221, Corequisite: 
Physics 232. 

*225. College Physics I. Credits 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3822) 

A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics, properties of motion, 
heat and thermometry, electromagnetism, wave motion, sound, light, and 
modern physics. Calculus is not used, however, a knowledge of analytical 
geometry is required. Prerequisite: Math 113 or 116. 

*226. College Physics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3826) 

A continuation of Physics 225. Prerequisite: Physics 225, Corequisite: 
Physics 236. 

231. General Physics I Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 

Resource material will be provided for self-study and special projects. A 
selected group of experiments will be performed to verify and demonstrate 
certain physical phenomena. Corequisite: Physics 221. 

232. General Physics II Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 
A continuation of Physics 231. Corequisite: Physics 222. 

235. College Physics I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 

A course which will emphasize the importance of experimentation and 
observation in the development of a physical science. A selected group of 
experiments will be undertaken. Corequisite: Physics 225. 

236. College Physics II Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 
A continuation of Physics 235. Corequisite: Physics 226. 

400. Physical Mechanics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3840) 

An application of mathematical methods to motion of a particle, damped 
harmonic oscillator, central field motion, rotating coordinate systems, Fourier 
series, Lagrange's equations. Vector methods used. Prerequisite: Physics 222. 
Corequisite: Math 300. 



'These courses may be used to satisfy the general education science requirement. 



Department of Physics 201 

401. Mathematical Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Applications of mathematics to solution of physical problems. Selected topics 
in vector analysis, differential equations, special functions, calculus of varia- 
tions, eigen-values and functions, matrices. Prerequisite: Math 500. 

402. Thermodynamics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3842) 

Includes equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, entropy, fluid flow, 
heat transfer, single and two-phase mixtures, and statistical mechanics. 
Prerequisite: Physics 222. Corequisite: Math 300. 

403. Electromagnetism I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3843) 

Includes DC and AC circuitry theory, Gauss' Law, Poisson and Laplace equa- 
tions, dielectric and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: 
Physics 222, Math 300. 

404. Physical Optics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3844) 

Emphasis on wave phenomena. Includes propagation, relection, refraction of 
light, lenses and optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polarization, 
line spectra, thermal radiation. Prerequisites: Physics 222, Math 117 or 222. 

405. X-Ray Diffraction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3845) 

An introductory course with emphasis upon the power method, including 
x-ray sources, crystal shapes, and determination of unit cell parameters and 
atomic positions. Prerequisite: Physics 406 or special permission. 

406. Introduction to Modern Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3846) 

Quantization of mass, charge, radiation, atomic structure, relativity, theory 
on solids, natural and artificial radioactivity. Prerequisites: Physics 222 or 226, 
Math 222 or 117. 

408. Solid State Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3848) 

Structure and imperfections in crystals and metals, energy levels of metals, 
semi-conductors and their applications, insulators. Prerequisite: Physics 222 
and preferably 406. 

410. Introduction to Special Relativity. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the relativistic concepts of space and time. Relativistic kinemat- 
ics, dynamics, and electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: Physics 406. 

420. Physics Seminar I. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3851) 

A study of current developments in physics. 



202 Department of Physics 

421 Physics Seminar II Credits 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3851) 

A study of current developments in physics. 

430. Physics Research I. Variable 1-3 
(Formerly Physics 3853) 

Involves student participation in research conducted by staff. Prerequisite: 
Consent of staff. 

431. Physics Research II. Variable 1-3 

(Formerly Physics 3854) 

Involves student participation in research conducted by staff. Prerequisite: 
Consent of staff. 

555. Advanced Laboratory I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Physics 3865) 

A junior-senior level course with groups of experiments involving vacuum 
systems, magnetic resonance, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy and quantization 
of charge. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Physics 406, 403. 

556. Advanced Laboratory II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Physics 3866) 

A continuation of Advanced Laboratory I. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

557. Advanced Laboratory III. Credit 3(0-6) 

A junior-senior level course involving the study and careful performance of 
a group of experiments in electronic devices as applied to physics. Prerequisite: 
Junior Classification. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Physical Mechanics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3841) 

A continuation of Physics 400. Prerequisites: Physics 400, Math 500. 

602. Electromagnetism II. Credits 5(5-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3872) 

A continuation of Physics 403. Prerequisites: Physics 403, Math 500. 

605. Quantum Mechanics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3874) 

Postulates of wave mechanics and Schrondinger equation. Solutions of the 
Schrodinger equation for the harmonic oscillator, the square well, and the 
hydrogen atom. Concepts of spin and angular momentum. Approximate solu- 
tions of the Schrodinger equation, perturbation theory. Stark and Zeeman 
affects. Prerequisites: Physics 406 and Math 500. 



Department of Political Science 203 

606. Nuclear Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3875) 

Nuclear structure, nuclear interactions, radioactive decay, reactions and 
crosssections, nuclear forces, and scattering theory. Prerequisites: Physics 406, 
Math 500. 

615. Quantum Mechanics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

The problem of one and two electron atoms. Hydrogen atom and the alkalis. 
The hydrogen molecule and the molecular bond. The deutron problem in 
nuclear physics. Alpha decay. Scattering theory and the nature of the nuclear 
force. The motion of a partical in a periodic potential and the role of Quantum 
Mechanics in solids. Operator formalism. Prerequisite: Physics 605. 

705. General Physics for Science Teachers I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3885) 

For persons engaged in teaching. Includes two hours of lecture demonstration 
and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Emphasis is placed upon un- 
derstanding the basic principles of physics. Both courses may be com- 
bined during a single semester for double credit. For teachers only. Prerequisite: 
College Physics. 

706. General Physics for Science Teachers II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3886) 

A continuation of Physics 705. 

707. Electricity for Science Teachers. Credits 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3887) 

Includes electric fields, potentials, direct current circuits, chemical and 
thermal emfs, electric meters, and alternating currents. For teachers. Pre- 
requisite: College Physics. 

708. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I. Credits 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3888) 

An introductory course covering the usual areas of modern physics. Both 
courses may be combined during a single semester for double credit. For 
teachers only. Prerequisite: College Physics. 

709. Modern Physics for Science Teachers II. Credits 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3889) 

A continuation of Physics 708. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

In keeping with the objectives of the University, and the political science 
profession, all study within the department has the following aims: 

1. To develop a basic understanding of the operation of government at vari- 
ous levels. 

2. To develop a basic understanding of the individual as a political entity. 



204 Department of Political Science 

3. To develop competence in the language and skills of the discipline. 

4. To develop a sense of tolerance for miniority views, divergent views and 
unpopular beliefs. 

5. To encourage students to engage in constructive criticism of the political 
and social problems. 

6. To prepare students for advanced study. 

The Department offers a major requiring 30 semester hours of course work 
in political science plus 12 hours of study in a cognate area. Eighteen credit 
hours are required for a minor in political science. 

THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

A student may major in the general subject of political science or pursue a 
more concentrated program appropriate to his or her personal interests, career 
objectives and plans for graduate study. Fields of concentration are listed be- 
low with the careers for which they provide necessary preparation. 

1. American Politics: graduate study in political science and certain govern- 
mental careers. 

2. Public Policy and Administration: careers in public service and adminis- 
tration, urban planning and policy evaluation; and certain business oc- 
cupations. 

3. Pre-Law: legal and para-legal careers. 

4. International Affairs and Comparative Politics: graduate study in political 
science and international affairs, and careers in the foreign service, in- 
ternational governmental and business organizations. 

The student's departmental advisor will suggest elective course work with- 
in each area of concentration. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJORS 

Course Title 
American Government and Politics 
State and Local Government 
Political Theory 
Public Administration 

A minimum of eighteen hours must be selected from the following list to com- 
plete the major requirements: 

Course Title 
Blacks in the American Political System 
Introduction to Political Research 
Mass Political Attitudes and Behavior 
International Relations 
Problems of Contemporary Africa 
Politics of Black African Revolution 
Contemporary American Political Thought 
Politics of Transportation 
Independent Study 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Pol. Sc. 200 


3 


Pol. Sc. 210 


3 


Pol. Sc. 440 


3 


Pol. Sc. 443 


3 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Pol. Sc. 220 


3 


Pol. Sc. 333 


3 


Pol. Sc. 400 


3 


Pol. Sc. 444 


3 


Pol. Sc. 445 


3 


Pol. Sc. 446 


3 


Pol. Sc. 447 


3 


Pol. Sc. 448 


3 


Pol. Sc. 504 


3 



Department of Political Science 



205 



Pol. Sc. 505 


3 


Pol. Sc. 540 


3 


Pol. Sc. 541 


3 


Pol. Sc. 542 


3 


Pol. Sc. 544 


3 


Pol. Sc. 640 


3 


Pol. Sc. 641 


3 


Pol. Sc. 642 


3 


Pol. Sc. 643 


3 


Pol. Sc. 644 


3 


Pol. Sc. 645 


3 


Pol. Sc. 646 


3 


Pol. Sc. 647 


3 


Pol. Sc. 653 


3 



Honors Seminar in Political Science 

American Foreign Policy 

Party Politics and Pressure Groups 

American Constitutional Law 

International Organization 

Federal Government 

Seminar in State Political Problems 

Modern Political Theory 

Urban Politics and Government 

International Law 

American Foreign Policy — 1945 to present 

The Politics of Developing Nations 

Research and Current Problems 

Urban Problems 



MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History (See Below) 3 

Physical Science 100 — 

Biological Science 100 4 

Education 100 1 

Physical Education 101, 102 1 

Health Education 200 2 

Political Science 200 — 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
4 



_3_ 

17 



The following History courses may be elected by Freshmen students 
to satisfy the core requirements: 100, 101, 105, 107. 



Sophomore Year 



Course and Number 
French 100, 101 or 
German 102, 103 or 
Spanish 104, 105 

Speech 250 

Political Science 210 
History 204, 205 
Humanities 200, -201 
Political Science 220 

Psychology 320 

*Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



3 

3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 

3 

3 

3 
_3_ 
18 



206 Department of Political Science 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Pol. Sc. 440, Sociology 302 3 3 

Elective Political Science 3 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 3 

Philosophy 260 or 261 or 262 — 3 

*Electives _3 _3_ 

15 18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Elective Political Science 3 3 

Elective Political Science 3 3 

*Electives 3 3 

*Electives _2 _2_ 

11 11 



COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

200. American Government and Politics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to the operation of the American political system. Includes con- 
stitutional organization, governmental institutions, political participation and 
leadership, individual rights and public policy issues. 

210. State and Local Government. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the structure and functions of state and local government in the 
United States and their relationship within the federal system. Special con- 
sideration is given to contemporary problems. 

220. Blacks in the American Political System. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed primarily to facilitate the development of a frame of 
reference which will make it possible for students to organize and interpret 
political phenomena involving Black people living in the United States. Spe- 
cial emphasis is placed on understanding the Black predicament in this coun- 
try, causes and changes. 

333. Introduction to Political Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2815) 

Introduces students to fundamental methods and procedures in the collecting 
and analyzing of political data. Research on a specific political subject is re- 
quired. 



*Electives should be chosen from the following areas: English, History, Economics, Transportation, 
Business Administration and Sociology. For suggested courses, see your advisor. 



Department of Political Science 207 

400. Mass Political Attitudes and Behavior. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of mass political attitudes and their expression in various forms of 
political activity. Topics include opinion and democratic theory; social, psy- 
chological and institutional influences on political behavior; opinion measure- 
ment and mass movements. 

440. Political Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2940) 

An in-depth treatment of the growth and development of this area of Poli- 
tical Science and its relevance to the field. The approach considers ancient and 
medieval thought as a unit and modern political thought as a separate unit. 

443. Public Administration. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2944) 

Emphasis is devoted to basic principles of organization, location of authority, 
fiscal management, personnel management, forms of administrative action 
in the public service, technological and managerial advancements. Prere- 
quisite: 200, 210. 

444. International Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2945) 

A comprehensive treatment of the policies and politics of nations; imperial- 
ism, colonialism, balance of power, international morality, treaties, sovereignty, 
diplomacy, tariff, war and other arrangements. Prerequisite: Pol. Sc. 200. 

445. Problems of Contemporary Africa. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2815) 

Consideration of liberation struggles, decolonization and the emerging of 
independent states, and efforts toward Pan-Africanism since World War II. 

446. Politics of the Black African Revolution. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2912) 

A look at the development of resistance to white colonialism, neo-colonial- 
ism, and general international relations. 

447. Contemporary American Political Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2917) 

A study of contemporary American political theories and ideas ranging from 
William Buckley to Herbert Marcus and Stokely Carmichael to Martin Luther 
King. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding, studying, evaluating, 
and meaningful alternative to our present government. 

448. Politics of Transportation. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of political roots of various transportation problems such as highway 
location issues, mass transit bond issues, and politics of transportation innova- 
tion. The working mechanisms of federal, state and local transportation related 
units will also be considered. Case studies of local, regional and national issues 
will be included. Prerequisite: Junior status. 



208 Department of Political Science 

504. Independent Study. Credit 3(3-0) 

Senior Political Science majors who have exhibited facility for independent 
study and attained a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in their major may 
arrange to investigate an area not covered in the regular curriculum. 

Permission of the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson 
is required. 

505. Honors Seminar in Political Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2816) 

For superior students (seniors). A thorough examination of selected political 
works, primarily paperbacks. A treatment of selected political philosophies 
and ideas for informal discussion. Several critical reviews will be required. 

540. American Foreign Policy. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2964) 

An analysis of principles and problems of American Foreign Policy from 1789 
to the present. Prerequisite: Pol. Sc. 200. 

541. Party Politics and Pressure Groups. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2965) 

This course deals with modern political parties in the United States as in- 
struments of popular government. Special emphasis is placed upon party 
structure, functions and operations as it relates to the Negro. Prerequisite: 
Pol. Sc. 200. 

542. American Constitutional Law. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2966) 

A case study of major Supreme Court Decisions, the Judiciary, the Congress, 
the President, the Federal System, the First Amendment Freedoms and Due 
Process Rights. 

544. International Organization. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2968) 

This course analyzes the role of the international organization in world poli- 
tics. Particular emphasis is given to the various approaches of international 
organizations in fostering peace and economic and social cooperation. Some 
attention will be given to the United Nations system as well as such defense, 
political, and economic arrangements as NATO, OAS, SEATO and the European 
Communities. 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

640. Federal Government Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 

After a brief review of the structure and functions of the federal government, 
this course concerns itself with special areas of federal government: problems 
of national defense, the government as a promoter, the government as regu- 
lator, etc. Students will engage in in-depth study in one of the specific areas 
under consideration. 



Department of Political Science 209 

641. Seminar in State Political Problems Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2977) 

An in-depth study of special problems connected with operations of state and 
local governments. 

642. Modern Political Theory Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5973) 

Includes selected political works for adherence to modern conceptions of the 
state, political institutions as well as the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, 
Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and Dewey. 

643. Urban Politics and Government Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5975) 

A detailed analysis of the urban political arena including political machinery, 
economic forces and political structures of local governmental units. 

644. International Law Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 543) 

A study of the majors principles and practices in the development of the Law 
of Nations, utilizing significant cases for purposes of clarification. Prerequi- 
sites: Pol. 200, 444. 

645. American Foreign Policy— 1945 to present Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, Yalta, 
and World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were 
formulated, why they were formulated, the consequences of their formulation, 
and the alternative policies that may have come about. Prerequisites: Survey 
course in American history, American Diplomatic History, and consent of in- 
structor. 

646. The Politics of Developing Nations Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5974) 

Political structures and administrative practices of selected countries in Afri- 
ca, Latin America, Asia, analysis of particular cultural, social and economic 
variables peculiar to the nations. 

647. Research and Current Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of selected problems of current importance with an emphasis on the 
application of scientific methods of research and analysis. 

653. Urban Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of some of the major problems in contemporary urban America. The 
course includes an examination of their causes, effects and possible solutions. 

Courses For Graduates Only 

(For descriptions see Bulletin of the Graduate School). 

730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2896) 



210 Department of Psychology 

740. Government Finance Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2898) 

741. Comparative Government Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2899) 

742. Research and Current Problems Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2980) 

743. Readings in Political Science Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5985) 

Pre- Law Students 

Students often ask, what course of study is best if one desires to enter law 
school upon graduation. The University of Denver Bulletin, College of Law, 
makes the following comment: 

"In the College of Law, as in most law schools, there is no course of study pre- 
scribed to precede admission to the study of law. A desirable prelegal course is 
one which prepares the student to think analytically, to reason logically, to con- 
centrate effectively, to study purposefully and to express himself clearly in writ- 
ing and speaking. In general, the prelaw student should acquire a broad liberal 
education. So far as possible, choice of courses should be made in accordance 
with the individual student's interest and needs. However, the student is strong- 
ly urged to obtain a broad background in the English language, including read- 
ing, writing and speaking." 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Emory Sadler, Chairman 
The Department of Psychology offers curricula leading to the following: 

1. B.A. degree in Psychology 

2. B.A. degree in Psychology with a Concentration in Manpower 

3. A.A. or B.A. in Psychology with a Concentration in Community Mental 

Health 

The Manpower Concentration and Community Mental Health Programs 
are designed to prepare majors for immediate employment following gradua- 
tion and for graduate study. The curriculum for the B.A. degree in Psychology 
is designed to prepare students for graduate study in the field of psychology. 

The Major in Psychology 

The major program is designed for the student whose occupational goal, 
following pre-professional undergraduate and professional graduate train- 
ing, is in the general field in psychology. Samples of specific positions for 
which these two levels of training prepare the individual are: college pro- 
fessor, experimental psychologist, social psychologist, public opinion analyst, 
test designer, clinical psychologist, industrial psychologist, management con- 
sultant, school psychologist, rehabilitation worker, vocational counselor, and 
psychometrist. 



Department of Psychology 211 

Students with majors in psychology must first satisfy general education 
requirements prescribed by the School of Arts and Sciences with respect to 
English, foreign languages, health and physical education, and humanities. 
The mathematics requirements for psychology majors include Analytic 
Geometry and Calculus; the science requirements include one course in 
Biological Science, one course in Human Anatomy and Physiology, and one 
course in Physical Science; and the social science requirements include 
Western Civilization I and II and one course in Principals of Sociology. 
Psychology majors will preferably complete Elementary Psychology rather 
than the course in General Psychology which represents a general education 
course for non-psychology majors. 

Requirements in the area of specialization, including Elementary Psychology, 
are completion of sixteen (16) courses provided by the Department of 
Psychology with a minimum cumulative grade point average equaling or ex- 
ceeding the overall minimum cumulative grade point average required by the 
University for graduation. Thirteen of the courses are prescribed. The addi- 
tional three courses are departmental electives and should be selected with the 
approval of the student's advisor from among those listed below as Require- 
ments for a B.A. in Psychology. 

The Minor in Psychology 

The minor program in psychology is designed for the student who desires 
training in the discipline beyond the level of an introductory course but 
whose occupational objectives are in fields other than psychology. These 
include law, medicine, education, social welfare, business administration, and 
the like. Such students will normally pursue those general education courses 
and major courses which are prescribed by the departments in which they 
are registered during the first two years of college work. 

In addition, during their sophomore year, they should take Psychology 
320, General Psychology and Psychology 322, Statistical Methods (or an equiv- 
alent first course in statistics). During the junior and senior years, the psychol- 
ogy minor will pursue an additional eighteen semester hours in psychology 
selected from among other course offerings of the department, the only re- 
striction being that the selection is limited to those courses whose prerequisites 
have been previously met. 

Requirements for a B.A. in Psychology 

General Education Requirements (54 hours) 

Biology 100, Biological Science/Lab 4 

English 100, 101, Ideas and Their Expression I and II 6 

History 100, 101, World Civilization I and II 6 

Sociology 100, Principles of Sociology 3 

Physical Science 100, 110, Physical Science/Lab 4 

Foreign Language 6 
either 100, 101, Elementary French I and II or 

102, 103, Elementary German I and II or 

104, 105, Elementary Spanish I and II 

Physical Education 101, 102, Fundamentals 2 

Mathematics 101, 102, Freshman Mathematics I and II 6 

Health Education 200, Personal Hygiene 2 

Humanities 200, 201, Survey of Humanities I and II 6 



2 1 2 Department of Psychology 

Speech 250, Speech Fundamentals 2 

Zoology 461, Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab 4 

Humanities Elective (Art, English, Humanities, Music, 3 
Philosophy, or Speech) 

Departmental Requirements (37 hours) 

Psychology 100, Orientation to Psychology 1 

Psychology 321, Elementary Psychology 3 

Psychology 322, Statistical Methods 3 

Psychology 324, Developmental Psychology I 3 

Psychology 325, Developmental Psychology II 3 

Psychology 420, Social Psychology 3 

Psychology 434, Abnormal Psychology 3 

Psychology 439, Theories of Personality 3 

Psychology 440, Introduction to Psychological Research 3 

Two of the following: " 

Psychology 441, Information Processing 3 

Psychology 540, Physiological Psychology 3 

Psychology 541, Psychology of Learning 3 

Psychology 542, Seminar in Psychology 3 

Psychology 544, Psychological Testing 3 

Departmental Electives (9 hours) 

Three of the following: 9 

Psychology 437, Mental Hygiene 3 

Psychology 441, Information Processing* 3 

Psychology 444, Applied Psychology 3 

Psychology 445, Industrial Psychology 3 

Psychology 540, Physiological Psychology* 3 

Psychology 541, Psychology of Learning 3 

Psychology 545, History and Systems in Psychology 3 

Psychology 645, Behavior Modification 3 

Free Electives (24 hours) 2(1 
* Whichever is not used to satisfy the departmental requirements above. 



The Major in Psychology with a Concentration in Manpower 

The Department of Psychology offers a Manpower Concentration which pro- 
vides an understanding of manpower planning, manpower program evaluation, 
and manpower administration. In this concentration, students gain expertise 
in coping with problems of employment and additional skills for careers in 
state, city, and county government, federal agencies, private industry, and com- 
munity manpower agencies. 

Psychology majors with a concentration in Manpower should substitute Psy. 
444, 445, and 610 (Manpower Internship) for Psy. 434, 439, and 542 which may 
be used as departmental electives. They should also take Sociology 405, Busi- 
ness Administration 569, Economics 602 and 603 with 12 hours remaining as 
free electives. 



Department of Psychology 213 

COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY 



100. Orientation to Psychology Credit 1(1-0) 

A personal orientation to the department and an initial exposure to the 
major area of study. For example, an introduction to the departmental re- 
quirements, faculty interests, professional opportunities, and their implica- 
tions for behavioral careers. 

320. General Psychology. Credit 3 (3-0) 
An introduction to psychology as a life science especially designed for the 

major in areas other than psychology. Topics given major consideration 
include maturation and development; motivation, emotion, and personality; 
mental health; intelligence and aptitude; perception and attention; learning, 
forgetting, language, and thinking; social influences, attitudes, and beliefs, 
and vocational adjustment. 

321. Elementary Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 
An introduction to psychology as a behavioral science required of the 

major in psychology with enrollment restricted to such majors. Major 
areas of consideration include maturation and development; nervous system 
and internal environment; physiological basis of behavior; motivation, emo- 
tion, and personality; and, psychological testing. 

322. Statistical Methods Credit 3(3-0) 
Analysis and interpretation of research data. Descriptive statistics (frequency 

distributions, centrality, variability and correlation of measures), introduction 
to statistical inferences (normal curve sampling theory, chi-square tests of 
statistical hypotheses, t-tests, analysis of variance, Scheffe test ratio). 

324. Developmental Psychology I Credit 3(3-0) 

A comprehensive study of the physical, social, emotional personality, lan- 
guage and intellectual development of the child from birth through early child- 
hood. 

325. Developmental Psychology II Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of Child Development with emphasis on the periods of mid- 
dle childhood through adolescence. 

420. Social Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the study of the behavior of the individual in relation 
to factors in his social environment. Socialization, enculturation, attitude for- 
mation and modification, social influence on perceptual and conceptual 
processes, and social interaction. (Prerequisites: Psy. 324, 325) 

434. Abnormal Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

Behavior deviations and psychological disorders occurring during the 
several developmental stages; basic concepts employed in psycho-pathology, 
mental hygiene, and psychiatry. 



214 Department of Psychology 

437. Mental Hygiene Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of basic principles of adjustment and mental hygiene. 

439. Theories of Personality Credit 3(3-0) 
Contemporary theoretical formulations of the structure and development 

of personality and their empirical bases. 

440. Introduction to Psychological Research Credit 3(2-2) 
A survey of various research methods with an emphasis on experimental 

design, instrumentation, and the collection, analysis, interpretation, and re- 
porting of research data. (Prerequisite: Psy. 322, Statistical Methods or equiv- 
alent) 

441. Information Processing Credit 3(3-0) 
Sensation and perception including classical psychophysics, signal detec- 
tion, decision theory, information theory, and adaptation-level theory. 

444. Applied Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 
The utilization of psychological principles in five areas of American culture; 

effectively training new generations; maintaining mental health; adminis- 
trating justice; promoting economic progress; and facilitating efficient pro- 
duction. 

445. Industrial Psychology Credit 3(2-2) 
A consideration of the significance of individual differences in industry; 

employee selection and training; reduction of monotony and fatigue and the 
promotions of efficiency; accident prevention; psychological factors in employee 
turnover. 

540. Physiological Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the physiological and chemical processes (and their anatomi- 
cal substrates) that intervene between the arrival of sensory impulses in the 
central nervous system and the elaboration of responses to them. (Prerequisite: 
Zoo. 461) 

541. Psychology of Learning Credit 3(3-0) 
A general survey of those changes in performance as a function of practice 

subsumed under the label "learning." Consideration is given to the basic con- 
trolling variables; individual responses; such interactions of learned responses 
as chaining and transfer of training; and processes under the control if implicit 
and mediating activity such as retention and problem solving. 

542. Seminar in Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of selected major systematic views and theoretical issues in psy- 
chology. Each student participates in supervised research in psychological 
journals and other materials leading to an oral presentation and written paper 
on a substantive view or issue in psychology. 



Department of Psychology 215 

544. Psychological Testing Credit 3(2-2) 
Emphasizes the principles of measurement of psychological attributes: an 

examination of factors essential for a reliable and valid measuring instru- 
ment with an emphasis on the important role they play in producing their ef- 
fects. There will be discussion and preclinical experiences with the more valid 
tests available in the areas of personality, aptitude, attitude, interests, and 
intelligence testing. (Prerequisite: Psy. 322, Statistical Methods) 

545. History and Systems of Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 
A survey of the philosophical and scientific origins of contemporary theories 

of behavior including consideration of the schools and systems of thought 
which have emerged. 

610. Manpower Internship Credit 3(3-0) 
Off-campus cooperative assignments monitored and coordinated by Uni- 
versity and Departmental personnel. Concentration in Manpower-Seniors 
only. 

645. Behavior Modification Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of relevant research and techniques making use of either learning 
theory or behavior principles in the treatment of deviant behavior. Special 
emphasis is placed on the use of operant conditioning procedures in the pre- 
vention and treatment of abnormal behavior. 



AN INTERDISCIPLINARY TRAINING PROGRAM 

FOR PARAPROFESSIONALS IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH 

"A BEHAVIORAL DISCIPLINE; 

AN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY; 

A COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY" 

Hattye H. Liston, Director 

A PEOPLE/COMMUNITY/ACADEMIC DEGREE/HUMAN SCIENCE/ 
ECOLOGICAL-ORIENTED CURRICULUM. 

The interdisciplinary program curriculum to train paraprofessionals in 
community mental health offers the Associate in Arts degree and/ or the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. This program is an applied counterpart curriculum — 
a community psychology, differing from the traditional two and four year 
programs. It is a new and innovative program which provides the possibility 
of earning an Associate degree within one year or the Bachelor degree with- 
in two years. 

Academic and general educational training is provided within the scope of 
a curriculum designed to meet the University's as well as the State of North 
Carolina's requirements for the awarding of an Associate or Bachelor degree. 

The community mental health concentration is a part of the School of Arts 
and Sciences here at the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University. The program approach is an interdisciplinary one, in accord with 
the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education's special report — "Less Time, 
More Options: Education Beyond the High School." 



216 Department of Psychology 

The interdisciplinary curriculum synthesizes psychology, guidance, socio- 
logy, social welfare, physical education, health and recreation into core 
courses. It is structured to provide a generalist training with emphasis in the 
areas of emotional disturbances, mental retardation, social gerontology, cor- 
rections (adult and juvenile offenders), individual assessing of intelligence 
and mental ability, counseling, recreational therapy, drug and alcohol rehabi- 
litation and education. 

For .admission to the Program, each applicant should have: 

(1) A high school diploma or its equivalent; 

(2) Proof of some working or service experience; 

(3) A commitment to becoming a community mental health paraprofes- 
sional; and 

(4) A sensitivity for the training necessary to the acquisition of skills 
enabling one to perform a variety of tasks and roles in community 
mental health — A Human Resource Service/An Applied Psychology/ 
A Behavioral Science/A Community Psychology. 

Also it is preferable that applicants have some academic training and/ or 
working experience beyond high school. However, this is not required. Priority 
for student selection is given to persons referred to the program by com- 
munity agencies, veterans, licensed practical nurses, graduates of community 
colleges, housewives, and other mature individuals. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE 



Requirements Semester Credit Hours/ Percentage 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

English-Symbolic Comm. I 8 30% 

220-295 

Chemistry-Human Ecology I 4 

220-290 

English-Great Ideas and 6 

Movements I 

220-195 

OR Existing University courses 
MAJOR CORE 

Psychology 10 32% 

220-391, 220-392 

Psychology 10 

220-393, 220-394 
PRACTICUM I and II 

Community Mental Health 6 19% 

220-491 (Practicum I) 

Community Mental Health 6 

220-492 (Practicum II) 

♦Practice experiences should include a minimum of 200 contact hours. 



ELECTIVES from existing University courses 12 



TOTALS 62 100% 



Department of Psychology 



217 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR DEGREE 

Requirements Semester Credit Hours/ Percentage 

GENERAL EDUCATION 
Block I— English 

English-Symbolic Comm. I 8 30% 

220-295 

English-Symbolic Comm. II 8 

220-296 

OR Existing University courses 
Block II — Natural Sciences 

Chemistry-Human Ecology 4 

220-290 

Chemistry-Human Ecology 4 

220-291 

OR Existing University courses 
Block III — Humanities 

English-Great Ideas and 6 

Movements I 

220-195 

English-Great Ideas and 6 

Movements II 

220-196 

OR Existing University courses 
MAJOR CORE 

Community Mental Health I and II 10 

220-391, 220-392 

Community Mental Health III and IV 10 

220-39% 220-394 

Community Mental Health V and VI 10 

220-395, 220-395 

Community Mental Health VII and VIII 10 

220-397, 220-398 
PRACTICUM 

Community Mental Health-Practicum I 6 

220-491 

Community Mental Health-Practicum II 6 

220-492 

Community Mental Health-Practicum III 6 

220-493 

Community Mental Health-Practicum rV 6 

220-494 

*A maximum of 18 semester hours of credit; 24 may be allowed for previous 
work experience. At least 6 hours of Practicum must be taken while the 
student is enrolled in the Program. The number of Practicum hours earned 
should equal a minimum of 500 contact hours. 



ELECTIVES from existing University courses 

Courses offered in the University 24 

may be selected according to the 
students' needs and interests. ___ 

TOTALS 124 



19% 



100% 



218 Department of Psychology 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOLLOW: 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

English-Symbolic Communications I 220-295 

Fundamentals of communication skills. Includes reading, composition, 
speaking, logic mathematics, theories of information mass communications, 
creative projects. 

English Symbolic Communications II 220-296 

Advanced communication skills. Uses the problems approach to the pro- 
duction of communications, messages, including audiovisual media, and 
mathematical skills. 

Chemistry-Human Ecology I 220-290 

The integration of natural and physical sciences in a consideration of the 
relationships between organisms and their environment. Emphasis is on the 
development of man and his geographical, physiological, and sociological 
adjustments. 

Chemistry-Human Ecology II 220-291 

Continuation of 290. Examination of mass behavior in adjusting to the eco- 
system and the impact of ecology on mass behavior within a near environment. 

English-Great Ideas and Movements I 220-195 

A thematic approach and synthesis of literature, art, history, religion, and 
music. Critical analysis and judgment in aesthetic experiences. Individual 
projects and differentiated readings. 

English-Great Ideas and Movement II 220-196 
Continuation of 195. 



MAJOR CORE IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH 

Psychology-Community Mental Health I 220-391 

Introduction to the field of community mental health — its role and function, 
community organization, including an analysis of social needs, resources, and 
their relationships with the community's major social problems in American 
society. Field experiences and observations. 

Psychology -Community Mental Health II 220-392 

Continuation of 391. The urban society, social functioning and human be- 
havior, mental deficiency and abnormal behavior, fundamentals of physical 
education. Field experiences and observation. 

Psychology-Community Metal Health III 290-393 

Interviewing and counseling techniques and their use in mental health 
agencies, utilization of audiovisual media for communication, observation 
and data collection, introduction of psychological testing and measures. In- 
dividual projects, demonstrations, and observations. 



Department of Sociology and Social Service 219 

Psychology-Community Mental Health IV 220-394 

Continuation of 393. Survey of various methods of assessment of intelli- 
gence, personality, and the measurement of special aptitudes and educational 
achievement. Group encounter and sensitivity techniques. Individual projects, 
demonstrations, and observations. 

Psychology-Community Mental Health V 220-395 

Child development and adolescent development and the interrelationships 
with social behavior, including the contemporary family and society. Geriatrics 
and social gerontology. Consultants, field trips, observations, and activity 
therapies. 

Psychology-Community Mental Health VI 220-397 

Continuation of 395. Personality development, criminology, correction and 
parole guidance, alcoholism and drug addiction, rehabilitation for the of- 
fender/ex-offender. Consultants, field trips, observations, and activity 
therapies. 

Psychology-Community Mental Health VII 220-397 

Individual assessing of intelligence and mental abilities, therapeutic and 
rehabilitative recreation. Individual projects, observations, and field prac- 
tice. 

Psychology-Community Mental Health VIII 220-398 

Continuation of 397. Continued learning experiences in individual assessing. 
Release therapy, individual projects, observations and field practice. 

PRACTICUM 

Community Mental Health-Practicum I 220-491 

Supervised work experience in an institution or agency setting. 

Community Mental Health-Practicum II 220-492 

Supervised work experience in an institution or agency setting. 

Community Mental Health-Practicum III 220-493 

Supervised work experience in an institution or agency setting. 

Community Mental Health Practicum IV 220-494 

Supervised work experience in an institution or agency setting. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Frances Logan, Chairman 

The Department of Sociology and Social Service places emphasis on the or- 
ganization of its educational programs so that its graduates become contribut- 
ing members of our society. Attainment of this goal requires the provision of 
learning experiences which not only prepare students to pursue their career 



220 Department of Sociology and Social Service 

goals in the work world and in graduate programs but also prepare them to ac- 
cept their responsibility to become leaders in activities designed to alleviate 
social suffering and promote positive social conditions for all members of the 
society. 

The Department, therefore, offers curricula leading to the following degrees: 

1. Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

2. Bachelor of Science in Social Service 

The degree program in Sociology is designed primarily for those students who 
intend to pursue graduate study in Sociology. It offers preparation also for 
graduate study in related fields such as Urban Studies, Law and Criminal 
Justice, and Social Planning. Majors who have graduate education as a goal 
should be aware that admission to such programs is dependent upon demon- 
stration of academic achievement in undergraduate programs. It is necessary, 
therefore, for such students to strive to achieve and maintain a minimum cumula- 
tive grade point average of 3.00 on a four point scale, particularly in the junior 
and senior years. 

The degree program in Social Service is nationally accredited by the Council 
on Social Work Education and has as its primary objective the preparation of 
students for immediate employment in Social Work. In addition, it provides 
excellent preparation for graduate study. While preparation for practive is 
emphasized strongly in the junior and senior years, introduction to social work 
as a profession and learning experiences for testing motivative for such prac- 
tice are designed for students in their freshman and sophomore years. The 
program is designed also to make it possible for persons employed in social 
agencies and/ or persons desiring to complete requirements for the degree on a 
part-time basis to do so. The program for students attending school on a part- 
time basis includes all of the enriching learning experiences provided for full- 
time students. There is planned opportunity for interaction between both 
groups of students, in the classroom and in other educationally designed ex- 
periences. 

Recognizing the need for career options, the Department of Sociology and 
Social Service makes it possible for students to complete their major require- 
ments and to concentrate in Manpower, Transportation, or in the Cooperative 
Education Program. These programs are designed so that students are pre- 
pared for immediate employment following graduation with a Bachelor's degree. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CONCENTRATION IN MANPOWER 

Required Courses 

Economics 602 Manpower Problems & Prospects 

Economics 703 Manpower Planning 

Business Administration 569 Human Resource Management 

Sociology 302, Social Statistics 

Economics 305, or Elementary Statistics 

Psychology 322 Statistical Methods 

Psychology 445 Industrial Psychology 

Sociology 318 Practicum in Community 

Sociology 600 Seminar in Social Planning 



Department of Sociology and Social Service 221 

Electives 

Economics 604 Evaluation Methods 

Psychology 544 Psychological Testing 

Psychology 444 Applied Psychology 

Sociology 601 Seminar in Urban Studies 

Psychology 600 Introduction to Guidance 

Psychology 645 Behavior Modification 

Sociology 309 Disability and Employment 

A system of student advisement is available to all students in the Depart- 
ment. It is imperative that all students make use of the assistance of these 
advisors especially in planning their educational programs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN SOCIOLOGY 

During the FRESHMAN and SOPHOMORE years, the following courses 
should be completed: 

Biology and/ or Zoology 8 credits 

English 100, 101 6 credits 

Speech 2 credits 

Foreign Language 6 credits 

Health or Physical Education 2 credits 

Humanities 200, 201 6 credits 

Math 111, 113, 240 11 credits 

Philosophy 6 credits 

Sociology 100, 302, 204* 9 credits 

Political Science, Economics, or Psychology* 9 credits 

65 credits 



During the JUNIOR and SENIOR years, the following courses should be 
completed: 

Cognate area* 9 credits 

Foreign Language 6 credits 

Sociology 301, 402, 403, 303, 671* 15 credits 

Sociology electives* 6 credits 

English 7 credits 

Free Electives 16 credits 

59 credits 

*Must be completed with grade "C" or better. Total 124 credits. 

NOTE: Recommended cognate areas are Mathematics, Economics, Political 
Science, Psychology. 

Interested Students might explore the possibilities of the Manpower Pro- 
gram. 



222 Department of Sociology and Social Service 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN SOCIAL SERVICE 

During the FRESHMAN and SOPHOMORE years the following courses 
should be completed: 

Political Science or Economics 9 credits 

Psychology or Anthropology 6 credits 
Biology or Zoology or Earth 

Science 201 (Any 2 courses) 7-8 credits 

Mathematics 111, 112 8 credits 

Foreign Language 6 credits 

English 100, 101 6 credits 

Speech 2 credits 

Health or Physical Education 2 credits 

♦Social Service 133 3 credits 

♦Sociology 100, 302, 204 9 credits 

Social Service Elective 3 credits 

Typing 2 credits 

63-64 credits 



During the JUNIOR and SENIOR years, the following courses should be 
completed: 

Math 240 8 credits 

English (2 courses) 6 credits 
♦Social Service 306, 307, 333, 

334, 520, 571 21 credits 

♦Sociology 301, 303, 402, 403 12 credits 

Social Service Electives 3 credits 
Philosophy 3 credits 

Free Electives to equal 124 hours 13-14 credits 

61-62 credits 

♦Must be completed with grade "C" or better. 

NOTE: Mathematics 112— Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors Earth Science 
201— The Earth-Man's Environment. 



COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 

100. Principles of Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts and principles in Sociology as they are used to examine 
patterned and recurrent forms of social behavior. 

101. Basic Quantitative Analysis in Sociology. Credit 1(0-3) 

A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with S100, Principles of Soci- 
ology. It is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the de- 
scriptive and summary techniques utilized to analyze Sociological Data. 

200. Introduction to Anthropology. Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis and comparison of primitive cultures; further comparisons with 
modern cultures. 



Department of Sociology and Social Service 223 

204. Social Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

Major social problems in American society and their relationship to social 
structures. Prerequisite: Sociology 100, concurrent, Statistics. 

300. Topics in Cultural Anthropology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in language, culture, mythology, and religion designed to 
acquaint students with analyzing cultural patterning in this and other cultures. 

301. Origins of Social Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of the major historical sources, nature and growth of social thought. 
An introduction to the emergence of Sociological Theory in Europe and America 
in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

302. Social Statistics I. Credit 3(3-2) 

An introduction to elementary statistical reasoning. Prerequisite or con- 
current: Sociology 100. 

303. Social Statistics II. Credit 3(3-2) 

An introduction to elementary statistical reasoning. Prerequisite or concur- 
rent: Sociology 100. 

305. Reading for Honors in Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive and extensive library research on topics in Sociology. Prerequisite: 
"B" average. 

308. The Family. Credit 3(3-0) 

The family as a social institution, and family types in cross cultural perspec- 
tive. 

313. The Community. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the social areas commonly defined as communities, and analyses 
of the social processes that occur within their boundaries. 

402. Social Theories. Credit 3(3-0) 

Social thought and theory in its development from Comte to the present. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 302. 

403. Research Methods I. Credit 3(3-0) 
Techniques used in social research. Prerequisite or concurrent, Sociology 301. 

406. Criminology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Genesis and origin of crime and an analysis of theories of criminal behavior. 
Prerequisite: Six (6) hours of Sociology and/ or Social Servide. 

408. Independent Study I. Credit 3(0-9) 

Independent research on a specific topic or a delineated area in Sociology. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (May be used in place of Sociology 403.) 



224 Department of Sociology and Social Service 

501. Social Stratification. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of social inequalities and differentiation as related to social struc- 
tures and social systems. Prerequisite: Sociology 302. 

671. Research Methods II. Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of 403. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; minimum of 
6 to 9 credits in statistics and research. 

672. Selected Issues in Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

701. Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communications. Credit 3(3-0) 

Course is designed both to sensitize the student to the importance of cul- 
tural factors in non-verbal and verbal communication and to equip the student 
with ways to record and analyze this behavior. 

Courses in Social Service 

133. Social Professions, Fields and Services. Credit 3(2-2) 

Course is designed to introduce students to the human services professions 
with emphasis on Social Work as a profession. It explores the human service 
professions from historical, sociological, political and economic viewpoints. 

306. Social Functioning and Human Development. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected aspects of social responses to growth, health, disease and disability. 
Prerequisite: 133. 

307. Field Instruction I. Credit 5(0-16) 

Supervised learning experiences in selected agencies and settings. Prerequisite 
or concurrent 306, 334, 333. 

309. Disability and Employment. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will focus on selected mental, physical, and social disabilities, 
and their implications for coping and employment. 

318. Practicum in the Community. Credit 5(0-16) 

Selection of a community problem; study and analysis of the problem followed 
by corrective activities, when possible. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

320. Reading for Honors in Social Welfare. Credit 3(3-0) 

Extensive library research in selected areas of social welfare. Prerequisite: 
Sophomore standing, "B" average. 

325. Honors Seminar in Social Service. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in social welfare are extensively studies and discussed. Pre- 
requisite: "B" average, junior standing. 

333. Social Welfare. Credit 3(3-0) 

Social Welfare legislation and policy. Prerequisite: 133. 



Department of Sociology and Social Service 225 

334. Social Service Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 

Exploration of components of social work practice with emphasis on skill in 
practice as a generalist. Concurrent 307. Prerequisite or concurrent: 306, 333. 

425. Field Instruction II. Credit 3(0-9) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

520. Field Instruction III. Credit 5(0-16) 

Prerequisite: 306, 307, 333, 334. Concurrent 571. 

525. Independent Study. Credit 3(0-9) 

Independent research in a delineated area of social welfare. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. 

571. Advanced Social Service Methods. Credit 2(2-0) 

Continuation of 334 with deepening of social work skill. Attention is given to 
selected models of practice as a generalist. 

*Full time social work students are required to register for 306, 307, 333, 334 
concurrently. Part time students with faculty approval may complete 306, 333 
prior to registering for 307 and 334. 



IIMTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

(These courses offer credit in either Sociology, or Social Service) 

314. Black Experience. Credit 2(2-0) 

A topical seminar focusing on commonly shared experiences of American 
Blacks in selected social institutions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

370. Aging In Society. Credit 3(3-0) 

Aging and its implication in social institutions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

515. Independent Study II. Credit 3(0-9) 

Prerequisite: Six (6) hours of statistics, and/ or research. 

570. Senior Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 

Research and discussion of professional, and field issues related to careers 
in Sociology and in Social Service. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

600. Seminar In Social Planning. Credit 3(3-0) 

Personal and social values as related to social planning: "systems" theories 
program planning and evaluation. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

601. Seminar in Urban Studies. Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the nature and problems of cities, urban society and urban 
development. 



226 Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 

669. Small Groups. Credit 3(3-0) 

Elements and characteristics of small group behavior and process. Prerequi- 
site: Senior or graduate standing; permission of instructor. 

670. Law and Society. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice and 
injustices; barriers to and opportunities for legal redress, as related to contem- 
porary issues. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

671. Research Methods II. Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of 403. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; minimum of 
6 to 9 credits in statistics and research. 

672. Selected Issues in Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Course is designed to explore and research contemporary (current or con- 
troversial) issues and their impact on society. Emphasis is upon primary source 
material centered around topics selected by the instructor. 

701. Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication. Credit 3(3-0) 

Designed both to sensitize the student to the importance of cultural factors 
in non-verbal and verbal communication and to equip the student with ways 
to record and analyze this behavior. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and a 
course in Sociology, Anthropology, or Psychology. 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
AND THEATER ARTS 

Algeania Freeman, Chairman 

The Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts is designed to 
accomplish the following general aims: First, through the offering of a speech 
fundamentals course implemented by a voice and diction laboratory course, it 
seeks to develop standard oral-verbal skills needed for interpersonal communi- 
cation and public communication. Second, through courses in theater produc- 
tion, acting and dramatic literature; through courses in speech science such as 
speech pathology (speech therapy) and phonetics; through courses in public 
communication and rhetoric, it aims to provide the teaching/ learning experi- 
ences needed for both prospective teachers and directors of speech and theater 
co-curricular activities at the secondary school level. Third, the Department pro- 
vides pre-professional studies that prepare the student for graduate study in 
Speech and/ or Theater Arts. Fourth, through courses in theater production, 
acting, dramatic literature along with extensive co-curricular theater activities, 
the Department prepares those students with creative and aesthetic ability for 
careers in acting-directing. 

MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The student will select one of three concentrations of study in the Depart- 
ment of Speech Communication and Theater Arts: Speech Communication and 
Theater Education, Professional Theater, Speech Communication and Theater 
Arts, Speech Pathology, and Mass Media. 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 



227 



SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATER EDUCATION 



Bachelor of Science 125 Hours 



31 Hours Major 



Successful completion of this program leads to North Carolina teacher certi- 
fication. 

The Speech and Theater Education program which meets the approval of the 
N.C. State Evaluation Committee on Teacher Education is aimed at developing 
effective instructors of speech and theater at the secondary school level. Its 
specific aims are: (1) to develop teachers with personal competence in speech 
communication; (2) to develop critical analysis and creative thinking; and (3) 
to prepare teachers who can offer instruction in both the curricular and co- 
curricular activities at the secondary level in the areas of speech and theater. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND 
THEATER EDUCATION MAJORS 



Course No. 


Credit Hour 


Course Name 


*Speech 250 


2 


Speech Fundamentals 


Speech 251 or 




Public Speaking or 


Speech 252 


3 


Argumentation and Debate 


Speech 610 


3 


Phonetics 


Speech 510 


3 


Introduction to Speech Correction 


Theater 301 


3 


Elements of Acting 


Theater 302 


3 


Elements of Play Production 


Theater 500 


3 


History of the Theater I 


Theater 501 


3 


History of the Theater II 



Electives are listed among the course offerings from which at least 10 hours 
must be selected to complete the major requirements of 30 semester hours. 



SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATER ARTS 



Bachelor of Science 



124 Hours 



39 Major Hours 



The Speech Communication and Theater Arts degree, non-teaching is designed 
for the student who wants to pursue graduate study in preparation for profes- 
sions requiring professional competence in speech communication such as law, 
government, the ministry, public relations (business, industry), mass communi- 
cations, or speech pathology. 

This degree, less structured, not only offers the student greater option in 
choosing a large number of major electives but also in choosing a larger concen- 
tration of free electives that are allied with his major area. The student can 
choose from 24-29 hours of free electives and from 16-21 hours of major electives. 
A. REQUIRED COURSES FORTHE SPEECH AND THEATER ARTS MAJOR 



*This course meets General Education requirements. 



228 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 



(Non-Teaching) 



Course No. 
*Speech 250 
Speech 251 or 252 



Credit Hours 
2 
3 



Theater 302 3 

Theater 500 3 

Theater 501 3 

Speech 610 3 

Speech 510 3 

Total Number Major Hours— 18 
Total Number Major Electives— 21 
Total Number Hours— 39 



Course Name 
Speech Fundamentals 
Public Speaking or Argumentation 

and Debate 
Play Production 
History of the Theater I 
History of the Theater II 
Phonetics 
Introduction to Speech Correction 



B. REQUIREMENTS OF THE SPEECH PATHOLOGY OPTION 

In the Speech Pathology Option, the student must complete: Phonetics 610, 
Introduction to Speech Correction 510, Speech Pathology I 404, Methods in 
Speech Pathology 405, Audiology 407, and Voice and Diction 216. 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Course Name 


Speech 610 


3 


Phonetics 


Speech 510 


3 


Intro to Speech Correction 


Speech 404 


3 


Speech Pathology I 


Speech 539 


3 


Methods in Speech Pathology 


Speech 407 


3 


Audiology 


Speech 216 


1 


Voice and Diction 


Speech 250 


2 


Speech Fundamentals 


Speech 251 


3 


Public Speaking 



Total Major— 21 
Total Major Electives- 
Total Hours— 42 



-21 



MASS MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS CONCENTRATION 

The A. & T. State University operates its own campus radio station and closed 
circuit television studio. The Department of Speech and Theater, one of several 
departments scheduling courses in mass media communications, offers the 
following courses in the area. 

Course Name 
Radio Production I 
Television Production I 
Minorities in Mass Media 
Radio Production II 
Television Production II 
National & International Broadcasting 
Broadcast Management & Programming 
Cable-TV Seminar 



*This course counts as a General Education requirement. 



Course 


Credit Hours 


Speech 255 


3 


Speech 256 


3 


Speech 260 


3 


Speech 350 


3 


Speech 351 


3 


Speech 460 


3 


Speech 468 


3 


Speech 491 


3 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 229 

PROFESSIONAL THEATER 

Bachelor of Science 120 Hours 50 Hours Major 

Students who wish to prepare for careers in the Professional Theater must 
audition before the theater arts faculty and be approved before enrolling in 
the professional curriculum. Only those students whose backgrounds and abil- 
ities give evidence of probable success in their field are encouraged to enter 
this curriculum. The Department reserves the right to students a change from 
the professional program to the teaching program. 

Studies in theater for the undergraduate major are considered to be a part 
of the newly acquired Liberal Arts orientation of the University. Students who 
elect this concentration do not specialize in any one aspect of theater, but re- 
ceive a liberally oriented theater background which will permit sound speciali- 
zation after graduation. The concentration emphasizes, first, a substantial 
background in dramatic literature; second, classroom and directed study of 
performing arts; and third, presentation of various artistic endeavors in public 
performance. 

The newly constructed A. & T. State University Theater offers laboratories for 
participation in directing, scene design, playwriting, audience reaction, costum- 
ing, and make-up. 

Majors in professional theater may elect one year of study in two different 
languages through intermediate levels. 

Students may elect an additional 15 hours from among departmental course 
offerings to complete the major requirements of 50 semester hours. 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR PROFESSIONAL THEATER MAJORS 

Course No. 
Speech 250 
Speech 610 
Theater 301 
Theater 302 
Theater 500 
Theater 501 
Theater 400 
Theater 441 
Theater 440 
Theater 650 
Theater 656 

THE SPEECH LABORATORY 

The Speech Laboratory provides facilities and equipment for the evaluation 
and the improvement of the student's voice and diction. The Speech Laboratory 
implements the Department's Speech Improvement Program. 

THE SPEECH IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM is designed to provide super- 
vised laboratory practice to develop accepted or standard pronunciation pat- 
terns and a communicative speaking voice. Students benefiting from this pro- 
gram may use non-standard dialect or vocal quality that stems from cultural 
disadvantage. Students planning to enter professions or vocations that re- 
quire professional competence in voice and diction could benefit from the en- 
richment phase of this program. Such professions include teaching, law, the 
ministry, the theater, singing, and mass media. 



Credit Hours 


Course Name 


2 


Speech Fundamentals 


3 


Phonetics 


3 


Acting 


3 


Elements of Play Production 


3 


History of Theater I 


3 


History of Theater II 


3 


Scene Design 


3 


Stagecraft and Lighting 


3 


Play Directing 


6 


Acting or Technical Workshop 


3 


Advance Play Directing 



230 Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 

SPEECH, SPEECH PATHOLOGY, AND MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

216. Voice and Diction Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 

Supervised practice with the aid of an electronic laboratory in the develop- 
ment of speech intelligibility and an adequate speaking voice. For students 
whose professional pursuits require above average proficiency in articulation, 
pronunciation, and voice management; or for students whose substandard 
speech and voice patterns may come from cultural disadvantages, and for 
foreign students who wish to increase the intelligibility of their spoken Ameri- 
can English. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

*250. Speech Fundamentals. Credit 2(2-0) 

An introduction to the rhetorical, psychological, physiological, phonetic, 
linguistic, and communication bases of oral discourse. Preparation and prac- 
tice in public communication and interpersonal communication. 

*251. Public Speaking. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the methods by which public speeches are made clear, interesting 
and forceful; practice in writing and delivering speeches according to the audi- 
ence and occasion. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

*252. Argumentation and Debate. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study and practice in analysis, gathering of material, briefing, ordering of 
arguments and evidence, refutation, and delivery. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

*253. Parliamentary Procedures. Credit 2(0-2) 

Theory and practice in the rules and customs governing the organization 
and proceedings of deliberative bodies. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

255. Radio Production I. Credit 3(3-0) 

Practical experience in radio broadcasting techniques and conventional 
studio practices; projects in radio announcing and acting, creative dramatics, 
commercial announcements, variety shows, and verse reading. Programs 
planned and executed by the students. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

256. Television Production I. Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods and techniques in television production, directing and announcing; 
program design, lighting, audio, camera, and electronic techniques. Laboratory 
practice. 

260. Minorities in Mass Media. Credit 3(3-0) 

An overview of past and present minority contributions in the areas of 
major motion pictures, radio, television, newspaper and magazine. This 
course will also present a close look at minority roles in contemporary media 
development, with emphasis on possible career opportunities for minorities. 
(Survey course) 

335. Rhetoric of American Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical study of selected American orators — their speech making on contro- 
versial social and political issues from 1830-1960, as well as the impact upon 
their audiences. Black American orators included. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 231 

350. Radio Production II. Credit 3(3-0) 

Broadcast announcing styles and advanced principles of articulation, build- 
ing vocabulary skills and pronunciation. It will also include preparation for ac- 
quiring the FCC Third Class Operators License. Prerequisite: Successful com- 
pletion of Speech 255. 

351. Television Production II. Credit 3(3-0) 

Theories and methods of producing, writing and directing the various types 
of television shows, including the use of the elements of film and slides. Stu- 
dents will be expected to produce, write and direct selected program types i.e., 
news, public affairs, drama, documentary, variety, and talk. Prerequisite: 
Successful completion of Speech 256. 

404. Speech Pathology I— Articulation. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the disorders of speech-sound production in children and adults. 
Definition, classification, etiology, and treatment of articulation disorders. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 510 and 610. 

405. Methods in Speech Pathology— (Organic and Functional Disorders) 

Definition, classification, etiology and treatment of stuttering, voice, lan- 
guage, and articulation disorders in adults and children. 

407. Introduction to Audiology. Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to hearing sciences, hearing evaluation, hearing conserva- 
tion and aural rehabilitation. Prerequisite: Speech 404. 

420. Group Discussion. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the forms of discussion and the principles and methods under- 
lying them. Practice in leading and participating in discussion situations. 
Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

421. Oral Reading and Interpretation. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the analysis and the oral interpretation, of the forms of classical 
and modern literature, e.g. poetry, narrative prose, the essay, and dramatic 
literature. Oral practice in individual and group projects. 

460. National and International Broadcasting. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of systems of radio and television broadcasting in various coun- 
tries, including development, programming philosophies, methods of financing, 
technical standards and cross-cultural relationships. Prerequisite: Junior or 
Senior. 

468. Broadcast Management and Programming. Credit 3(3-0) 

Solving case studies of broadcast management problems, criticism of local 
and national programs broadcast; theories and practices in schedules for radio 
and television stations. Study methods and approaches for working with people 
and getting the most from their skills; invite local broadcast management per- 
sonnel to provide professional insight. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
Speech 350 and Speech 351. 



232 Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 

491. Cable-TV Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 

Review of the development of cable-television in the United States, includ- 
ing the law governing it, technical facilities necessary for an operation, methods 
of financing, type of programming content. The content will also include look- 
ing at the advantages and disadvantages for minorities programming. Pre- 
requisite: Successful completion of Speech 225 and Speech 256. 

510. Introduction to Speech Correction. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the causes, symptoms, and treatment of minor speech disorders, 
basic theories underlying speech correction. Aimed at preparing the classroom 
teacher to identify common speech disorders and to make referrals to speech 
therapists. Observation of speech clinics. 

539. Methods of Teaching Speech and Theatre. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the aims, objectives, problems and difficulties experienced in 
teaching speech in the modern school. Special attention is given to the organi- 
zation and coordination of both speech and theater curriculums, to planning 
courses of study, its presentation, and to the selection of materials and equip- 
ment required of all Speech and Theater Education majors. Prerequisites: 27 
hours of Speech and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

610. Phonetics. 

Broad transcription: The International Phonetic Alphabet; Standards of 
pronunciation; dialectal variations in America; physiological and acoustical 
bases of speech sounds. Prerequisite: Speech 250 or Consent of I nstructor. 

633. Speech for Teachers. Credit 2(2-0) 

Study and application of the fundamental principles of oral communication 
related to teaching and learning; speech activities and interpersonal relations 
identified with teaching and learning and the teaching profession; exercises 
for self-improvement in the various speech processes. 

636. Persuasive Communication. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the theory and practice of persuasive speaking in the democratic 
society, including formal and informal persuasive speaking, types of proof, and 
the ethics of persuasion. Practice in the preparation and presentation of per- 
suasive messages. 



THEATER 

300. Theatre Practice. Credit 1(0-2) 

Practical experience in staging and setting up technical designs; backstage 
work in costume, makeup, stagecraft, lighting, etc., is required. 

301. Acting. Credit 3(3-0) 

A laboratory course designed to evelop skill in voice, diction, and Pantomime 
by means of readings, monologues, skits, and short plays for school and com- 
munity; practical experience in the major A. and T. production. Prerequisite: 
Speech 250. 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 233 

302. Elements of Play Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

Study of basic principles in all aspects of production and application of these 
principles to particular situations; affords opportunities for practical experi- 
ence in acting, directing, lighting, scenery design, and construction. Prerequi- 
site: Speech 250. 

400. Scene Design. Credit 3(3-2) 

A course in perspective, dealing with the representation of common objects, 
interiors, buildings, and landscapes as they appear to the eye. One hour lec- 
ture and two hours laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Theater 441. 

440. Play Directing. Credit 3(3-0) 

Elementary principles of staging plays; practical work in the directing of the 
one-act play; attention is given to the principles of selecting, casting, and re- 
hearsing of plays. Exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: Theater 
301, 302. 

441. Stagecraft and Lighting. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of principles of scenery construction and painting; practice in mount- 
ing productions for major shows. Prerequisite: Theatre 302. 

457. Essentials of Playwriting. Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis on creative work and class criticism; structure, characterization 
and dialogue are studied with reference to standard plays. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

620. Community and Creative Dramatics. Credit 3(3-0) 

Theory and function of creative dramatics and applications in elementary 
education; demonstrations with children; special problems for graduate stu- 
dents. 

630. Early American Drama and Theatre to 1900. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of significant developments in the American Theatre since 1900 as 
reflected through her major playwrights and theatre organizations. 

650. Theater Workshop. Credit 3-6 (0-6) 

A particum involving the total theatrical experience. Involves units in act- 
ing, directing, stagecraft, designing and other such activities. Approximately 
90 clock hours are devoted to technical production. Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing or consent of instructor. 

653. Principles and Practice of Stage Costume. Credit 3(2-2) 

The function of costumes for the stage and for television, and their relation- 
ship to other elements of dramatic production. Includes research in construc- 
tion of authentic period forms. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

654. Problems in Acting. (Advanced) Credit 3(3-0) 

Acting problems arising from differences in the types and style of dramatic 
production; emphasis on individual and group performance. Prerequisite: 
Theater 301. 



234 Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 

655. Advanced Play Production. 

A study of modern methods of staging and lighting plays. Directing on a 
multiple set; arena staging, intellectual values; script analysis. Prerequisite: 
Theater 302, 440, and 441. 

656. Advanced Directing. Credit 3(2-2) 

A consideration of rehearsal problems and techniques as may be reflected in 
3-act play. In conjunction with the acting classes and the Richard B. Harrison 
Players, students direct projects selected from a variety of genres. Prerequisite: 
Theater 440. 



DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITEES 

The National Student Speech and Hearing Association organization (NSSH A) 
provides the student in Speech Pathology and Audiology an opportunity to 
affiliate with the American Speech and Hearing Association. Students parti- 
cipating in this organization receive association journals and are eligible for 
many other benefits at substantial savings. 

Alpha Psi Omega National Dramatic Honor Fraternity (Phi Epsilon Chapter) 
was chartered at New York University and installed on campus during the Fall 
semester, 1970. Students of high ability and who are nominated by the depart- 
ment are eligible for membership. See Student Handbook for details. 

Black Arts Repertory Company is dedicated to the production of plays and 
musical concerned with the experience of the black man in Africa and in the 
Western Hemisphere. Membership is not restricted to any race or group. Each 
year's will schedule special productions from the repertoire of black 

playwrights and other cultural artists. 

Richard B. Harrison Players is the regular dramatics organization which is 
open to all interested students enrolled in the University. The organization pre- 
sents its plays regularly in the Little Theater which is one of the more efficient 
facilities for theatrical productions in the nation. The theater seats 371 persons. 

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) exposes 
students who are taking the Mass Communications concentration to profes- 
sional commercial and non-commercial media employees, locally and nationally. 
NAEB membership affords students the participation in national media con- 
ventions, supplies complete lists of job openings in media on a month-by-month 
basis, and provides, free of charge, the regular NAEB newsletter. 

The area of Speech Arts provides training and numerous practical experi- 
ences in public communication and addresses, i.e., discussion, original oratory 
(persuasive speaking), informative speaking, extemporized speaking and "rap" 
sessions. Students belonging to this group also have the opportunity to engage 
in intercollegiate and speech festivals, both regional and national. 

Recommended Electives 

The Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts recommends 
the following electives to its majors who are pursuing either the teaching cur- 
riculum or the professional curriculum. 



Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 



235 



Music and Art 



Music 404 
Music 405 
Art 224 
Art 400 



History and Appreciation 
Baroque and Romantic Periods 
Art Appreciation 
Renaissance Art 



History 205 
History 206 
History 207 
History 107 
Sociology 204 
Sociology 306 
Sociology 401 



Social Science 

United States Since 1865 
History of Africa 
History fo the Negro 
Religions and Civilization 
Social Problems 
Minority Problems 
Origins of Social Thought 



English 300 
ish 221 
ish 431 
ish 410 
English 620 
English 752 
English 455 



Engl 
Engl 
Engl 



English 

Advanced Composition 

English Literature II 

American Literature II 

Shakespeare 

Elizabethan Drama 

Restoration and 18th Century British Drama 

Journalism 



Phy. Ed. 229 
Phy. Ed. 451 
Phy. Ed. 452 



Physical Education 

Dance 

Dance Composition 

Applied Dance 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
AND ECONOMICS 




SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Q. Craig, Dean 

PURPOSE 

A primary objective of the School of Business and Economics is to develop 
business leaders who are capable of coping with new technologies and social 
progress. The scope of the School's programs includes curricula based pri- 
marily upon key concepts and skills necessary for decision-making and prob- 
lem-solving roles in government, business, education, and industry. The School 
of Business and Economics also serves to perpetuate general understanding 
and appreciation for the interrelationships of the national as well as world 
socio-economic environments. 

The programs within the School of Business and Economics are divided into 
three parts, viz., general education, business and economics core, and courses 
from the selected area of concentration (accounting, business administration, 
business education, office administration or economics). Approximately forty 
percent consists of courses designed to give a broad foundation in general ed- 
ucation. Thirty percent consists of courses designed to give the student a com- 
prehensive background in the common body of knowledge in business and eco- 
nomics. Finally, approximately thirty percent involves courses in the area of 
concentration and necessary electives. 

Admission Requirements of the School of Business and Economics 

Graduates of standard high schools, and other students who are able to satis- 
fy the entrance requirements of the University, may be admitted to the School 
of Business and Economics. 

Course Load 

The normal course load is fifteen to sixteen (15-16) credit hours. A full-time 
undergraduate student is required to carry a minimum of twelve (12) credit 
hours. Students majoring in the School of Business and Economics may not 
enroll for more than eighteen hours without the approval of the Department 
Chairperson and the Dean. 



Degree Requirements 

The student is held responsible for the selection of courses in conformity 
with the curriculum of his/her choice. A student who enters the School of Busi- 
ness and Economics has the privilege of graduating under the provisions of the 
catalogue current upon admission provided all requirements are completed 
within six years. If all requirements are not completed within six years after 
admission, the student is expected to conform to the catalogue requirements 
specified for the class with with graduation is anticipated. 

The applicant for graduation must have earned a minimum of 124 semester 
hours excluding deficiency courses and remedial work with a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 or better on all courses undertaken and attain a cumula- 
tive grade point average of 2.00 or better in the major field of study. 



240 Department of Accounting 

Proficiency Examinations 

Students who have had some training or experience in certain fields offered 
in the School of Business and Economics will be given an opportunity to take 
an examination in such fields with the permission of the Chairperson of the De- 
partment and the approval of the Dean of the School of Business and Economics. 
A student who passes a proficiency examination is given credit toward gradua- 
tion, provided that the course is acceptable in his curriculum. Credit is given 
only if a grade of "C" is made on the examination. "S" is the grade recorded on 
the student's record. No official record is made of failures in these examina- 
tions. 

Proficiency examinations are given under the following restrictions: 

1. They may be taken only by persons who are in residence in the University 

2. They may not be taken to raise grades or remove failures in courses 

3. They may be taken only once in the same course 

Senior Residence Requirement 

Students must complete a minimum of three semesters as a full-time student 
in residence at the University which includes the two semesters prior to gradua- 
tion. At least one half of the student's credit in the major field must be earned 
at the university. Exception to either of these provisions may be made upon the 
recommendation of the Chairperson of the student's major department and the 
approval of the Dean of the School of Business and Economics. 



DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING 

Ladelle Hyman, Acting Chairman 

ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM 

Successful practice of accounting today requires both technical competence 
in accounting and thorough understanding of the economic environment in 
which accounting operates. Only by understanding the objectives and con- 
straints of the economic environment is the accountant able to apply his techni- 
cal competence toward the solution of business problems. 

The accounting curriculum attempts to meet this two-fold need by requiring 
broad exposure to the related business disciplines as well as rigorous training 
in the methodoloy and underlying theory of the specialized fields of account- 
ing. Successful completion of the degree requirements will prepare students 
for careers in public and/or corporate accounting, business and government, 
and provide a quality background for graduate study. The curriculum also pro- 
vides the opportunity for interested students to prepare for the CPA Examina- 
tion. 



Department of Accounting 241 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Social Science (Elective) 1 3 3 

Natural Science (Elective) 2 3-4 3-4 

Physical Education 1 — 

Health Education 200 2 — 

Business Administration 220 — 3 

16-17 16-17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 


Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






3 


2 




3 


3 




2 


17 


17 



Course and Number 

Accounting 221, 222 

Economics 300, 301 

Humanities (Elective) 3 

Psychology 320 

Business Administration 360 

Speech 250 

Economics 305, 310 

Electives (Nonbusiness) 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 430 — 3 

Business Administration 422, 361 3 3 

Economics 415 3 — 

Accounting 441, 442 3 3 

Accounting 443, Accounting Elective . . 3 3 

Business Administration 453, 550 _3_ _3_ 

15 15 



iRecommended Courses: History 100; 101; 105; 206; 207. Geography 200 and 
322; Political Science 230; Sociology 100 and 200. 

2 Recommended Courses: Biological Science 100; Physical Science 100; Intro- 
duction to Astronomy 101; Survey of Physics 201. 

3 Recommended Courses: Humanities 200; 201; and courses from Art, Music, 
and/or Literature. 



242 



Department of Accounting 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 3 

Accounting 545, 590 3 3 

Accounting 444, 561 3 3 

Business Administration 480, 520 3 3 

Elective 4 (Nonbusiness) J3^ _3_ 

15 15 



Major Program Requirements: Semester Hours 

Acct. 221 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

Acct. 222 — Principles of Accounting II 3 

Acct. 441 — Intermediate Accounting I 3 

Acct. 442 — Intermediate Accounting II 3 

Acct. 443 — Income Tax Accounting 3 

Acct. 444 — Cost Accounting 3 

Acct. 545 — Advanced Accounting 3 

Acct. 561 — Auditing Principles 3 

Econ. 305 — Elementary Statistics 3 

B.A. 451 — Business Law I 3 

30 



COURSES IN ACCOUNTING 

Undergraduate 

221. Principles of Accounting I. 

(Formerly Accounting 3321) 

Introduction to the basic records and procedures used by service and mer- 
chandising organizations in accumulating financial data with emphasis on state- 
ment presentation. Includes discussion of special problems of income measure- 
ment and asset valuation. Prerequisite: B.A. 220. 



Credit 3(3-1) 



222. Principles of Accounting II. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly Accounting 3322) 

Continuation of Principles of Accounting I. Emphasis on financial state- 
ment interpretation and uses of accounting data by management for planning 
and control. Prerequisite: Acct. 221. 

441. Intermediate Accounting I. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly Accounting 3341) 

Rigorous study of the methodology and underlying theory of financial ac- 
counting. In-depth analysis of valuation alternatives, problems, and their effect 
on the income measurement. Prerequisite: Acct. 222. 



4 Recommended Courses: English 300; Speech 251; and additional courses in 
Mathematics. 



Department of Accounting 243 

442. Intermediate Accounting II. Credit 3(3-1) 

A continuation of Accounting 441. A study of accounting theory and tech- 
niques underlying the determination of contents and values of accounts for the 
financial statement of a going concern. Prerequisite: Acct. 441. 

443. Income Tax Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3343) 

Study of current Federal Income Tax laws as they apply to individuals, part- 
nerships, fiduciaries, and corporations. Prerequisite: Acct. 222. 

444. Cost Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3344) 

Study of the principles and methodology of inventory cost determination and 
its effect on income measurement for manufacturing concerns, including prod- 
uct, process, and standard cost systems. Special attention given to uses of ac- 
counting data as an aid in managerial planning and control. Prerequisite: Acct. 

441. 

445. Selected Topics in Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

Topics are chosen to give additional consideration to selected accounting 
problems. Some attention is given to not-for-profit accounting. Prerequisite: 
Acct. 441. 

446. Managerial Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

Development of accounting concepts and techniques as aids to management 
planning and control; including budgeting, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit 
analysis, and responsibility accounting. Prerequisite: Acct. 222. 

545. Advanced Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

Branches and agencies; mergers and consolidations; parent and subsidiaries; 
pooling of interest vs. purchases; foreign exchange; fund accounting; and spe- 
cial advanced topics. Prerequisite: Acct. 441. 

561. Auditing Principles. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly Accounting 3361) 

Concentrates on the conceptual and practical aspects of the examination of 
financial statements by independent accountants within the framework of gen- 
erally accepted auditing standards. Prerequisite: Acct. 442. 

562. Accounting Systems. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3362) 

Focuses on current techniques of data processing with emphasis on principles 
of internal control. Prerequisite: Acct. 441. 

590. Seminar in Accounting Theory. Credit 3(3-1) 

The framework of ideas, concepts, and principles which make up the body of 
knowledge of accounting theory. Prerequisite: Accounting 442 and senior 
standing. 



244 Department of Business Administration 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Department Code 520 Major Code 21 

Willie H. Bailey, Acting Chairman 



Business Administration Curriculum 

The principal purpose of the department is to create an environment in which 
an individual can develop an inquiring mind and the ability to think objectively. 
The educational pattern that accomplishes this is a combination of courses that 
emphasize knowledge, skills, and tools and those that advance an administra- 
tive point of view. 

The basic philosophy of the Business Administration program recognizes 
that business procedure is subject to change over time and that methods of to- 
morrow may bear little resemblance to the techniques currently utilized. For 
this reason stress is laid upon fundamental knowledge concerning the field of 
business administration and tools for problem solving and decision making. 

The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Ad- 
ministration is designed for students to develop such competences as the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Competence to gain entry into an organization, work with people and con- 
duct meaningful analyses of a variety of types of problems 

2. Competence to plan effective communications; to communicate orally 
and in writing 

3. Competence to examine, to analyze systematically, and to select processes 
considered best for solutions to business problems 

4. Competence to interact with other disciplines and stay abreast of their own 
discipline 

5. Competence to develop proficiency in the application of selected analyti- 
cal approaches to the solution of meaningful problems arising throughout 
an organization, i.e., those dealing with managerial information systems, 
internal operations, and the external environment 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

Students majoring in Business Administration may select an area of study in 
Banking and Finance, Management, or Marketing. All students are required to 
successfully complete BA 360 — Business Communications. 

The following courses will be taken by all Business Administration Majors 
regardless of area of study: 



Department of Business Administration 



245 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Social Science electives 1 3 

Natural Science electives 2 3-4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

BA 220— Bus. Environment 3 

Health & Physical Education Electives . 

16-17 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 

3-4 
4 



16-17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics 305, 310 3 

Economics 305, 310 3 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Humanities electives 3 3 

Speech 250 2 

BA 360 — Business Communication — 

Psychology 320 3_ 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



BANKING AND FINANCE 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

BA 361, 480 3 3 

BA 422, 430 3 3 

BA 453, 455 3 3 

Accounting 441 , 442 3 3 

Economics 415 3 

BA 550 _ 3 

15 15 



Recommended Courses: History 100; 101; 105; 206; 207. Geography 200 and 
322; Political Science 230; Sociology 100 and 200. 

2 Recommended Courses: Biological Science 100; Physical Science 100; Intro- 
duction to Astronomy 101; Survey of Physics 201. 

3 Recommended Courses: Humanities 200; 201; and courses from Art, Music, 
and/or Literature; Foreign Languages. 



246 Department of Business Administration 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

BA 451, 452 3 3 

BA 551, 520 3 3 

Finance Electives 3 1 6 2 

Nonbusiness Electives 6_ 3_ 

15 15 

Major Program Requirements: Semester Hours 

BA 422 — Introduction to Management 3 

BA 452— Business Law II 3 

BA 453 — Business Finance 3 

BA 455 — Investments 3 

BA 550— Financial Management 3 

BA 551— Financial Markets 3 

Accounting 441 — Intermediate Accounting I 3 

Accounting 442 — Intermediate Accounting II 3 

Economics 310 — Advanced Statistics 3 

Economics 415 — Money and Banking 3_ 

30 



MANAGEMENT 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

BA 361, 480 3 3 

BA 422, 430 3 3 

BA 453, 550 3 3 

BA451, 452 3 3 

Accounting 446 3 — 

Economics 415 — _3_ 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

BA 438, 520 3 3 

BA481 3 

BA 522 3 

Management Electives 3 3 6 

Nonbusiness Electives _3_ _6_ 

15 15 



1 Select one course from the following: BA 552; BA 555; BA 557 

2 Select two courses from the following: BA 454; BA 457; Economics 410, 412, 
420, and 510. 

3 Select nine hours from courses in the School of Business and Economics or 
additional courses in English and Speech in consultation with Advisor. 



Department of Business Administration 247 

Major Program Requirements: Semester Hours 

Accounting 446 — Managerial Accounting 3 

BA 422 — Introduction to Management 3 

BA 430— Marketing 3 

BA 438— Marketing Management 3 

BA 452— Business Law II 3 

BA 453 — Business Finance 3 

BA 481 — Management Science I 3 

BA 522— Personnel Management 3 

BA 550— Financial Management 3 

Economics 310 — Advanced Statistics 3_ 

30 





MARKETING 








Junior 


Year 






Course and Number 

BA 361, 480 

BA 430, 431 

BA 422, 438 

BA 453 




Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 


Spring Sem 

Credit 

3 

3 

3 


Accounting 446 






Economics 415 




3 


Nonbusiness Elective 




3 






15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

BA 451, 452 543 3 

BA 481, 520 3 3 

BA 437, 439 3 3 

Marketing Electives 4 3 3 

Nonbusiness Electives _3_ _3_ 

15 15 
Major Program Requirements: Semester Hours 

BA 422— Introduction to Management 3 

BA 430— Marketing 3 

BA 431— Advertising . . , 3 

BA 439— Marketing Research 3 

BA 437 — Consumer Behavior 3 

BA 438— Marketing Management 3 

BA 452— Business Law II 3 

BA 481— Management Science I 3 

Accounting 446— Managerial Accounting 3 

Economics 310— Advanced Statistics 3 

30 



4 Select six credit hours from the following: BA 420; BA 433; Psychology 420; 
Courses in Transportation; and additional courses in Speech/English. 



248 Department of Business Administration 

COURSES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Undergraduate 

220. Business Environment Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 204) 

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the evolution of 
American business and the businessman, and an appreciation of the growing 
responsibilities facing both the company and its leaders. This course also covers 
enterpreneurship and the nature and problems of establishing a business enter- 
prise. Ultimately students should develop a satisfying personal business phi- 
losophy. 

360. Business Communication Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 450) 

The study of communication theory and its applications to business. Empha- 
sis also placed on composing the basic forms of business communication, in- 
cluding correspondence and reports. Prerequisite: English 101. 

361. Introduction to Data Processing Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 372) 

A business-oriented discussion of concepts, computer hardware, data repre- 
sentation, file design and problem solving techniques. The course will con- 
clude by familiarizing students to a brief treatment of COBOL programming 
language. Prerequisite: Accounting 221. 

420. Human Behavior in Business Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 490) 

Introduction of behavioral concepts of concern to management. Emphasis is 
placed upon the analysis of interpersonal relations, communication practices, 
and morale factors relative to the effect upon productivity, organizational ef- 
fectiveness, and personal systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

422. Introduction to Management Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 322) 

This course covers an analysis of the basic managerial processes at the ad- 
ministrative, staff, and operational levels of a firm. Attention is given to he 
role of organization theory as it applies to achieving managerial objectives 
through available tools for obtaining desired results. 

430. Marketing Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 440) 

Marketing is a basic function in the firm and in the economy. Emphasis is 
placed on the relationship between marketing activities and the consumer. In- 
cludes both functional and institutional aspects of marketing. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing. 

431. Advertising Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 458) 

Analyzes the fundamentals of advertising, including various advertising me- 
dia. Prerequisite: Business Administration 430. 



Department of Business Administration 249 

433. Retailing Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 570) 

Emphasis is on retail store management. Attention is given to store location, 
layout, personnel, organization, buying, inventory, sales promotion, customer 
services and operating expenses. Prerequisite: Business Administration 430. 

435. Salesmanship Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 565) 

Treats the fundamentals of planning, acquiring resources, organizing, and 
operating a sales organization. Prerequisite: Business Administration 430. 

436. Marketing Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Types of research techniques used by business coordinated marketing activi- 
ties with consumer demand. Emphasis placed upon survey, observational and 
experimental techniques used in marketing. Prerequisite: Economics 310 and 
Business Administration 430. 

437. Consumer Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

Develops the knowledge of the behavioral content of marketing in consum- 
er, industrial, and international fields. Examines the applicable theory, re- 
search findings, and concepts that are provided by psychology, sociology, an- 
thropology, and marketing. The course stresses the conceptual models of buyer 
behavior based upon sources of influence: individual, group, culture, environ- 
ment. Prerequisite: Business Administration 430. 

438. Marketing Management Credit 3(3-0) 

A course to develop an understanding of marketing problems and to survey 
policies and procedures for the formation, execution and appraisal of market- 
ing programs. Prerequisite: Business Administration 430. 

451. Business Law I Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3351) 

Nature of legal rights and obligations, resolution of disputes, law as an ex- 
pression of social forces, contracts, personal property and bailments. Prerequi- 
site: Junior standing. 

452. Business Law II Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3352) 

Treats sale of goods, security devices, commercial paper, agency and em- 
ployment, corporations, partnerships, real estate, government and business. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 451. 

453. Business Finance Credit 3(3-0) 
Formerly Business Administration 578) 

An introduction to the financial problems of business organizations, the fi- 
nance function and its relationship to other decision-making areas in the firm, 
the concepts and techniques for planning and managing the acquisition and al- 
location of financial resources from the standpoint of internal management. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 222 and Junior standing. 



250 Department of Business Administration 

454. Risk and Insurance Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Principles of Insurance) 

Introduction to risk management with emphasis on varied applications of in- 
surance as a technique for treating uncertainty. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

455. Investments Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 571) 

Analyzes the various types of corporate and public securities; examines the 
operation of securities markets. Prerequisite: Business Administration 453. 

457. Real Estate Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3357) 

Analyses the fundamental laws of real property with special emphasis on the 
changing character of the urban economy; buildings and land use and their 
values. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

470. Urban Transportation Concepts Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the role of transportation in the urban scene. Topics cover 
transportation needs of the poor, demand for the modes of transportation, and 
urban transportation planning methods. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

480. Production Management Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 493) 

A survey of the major production and operations functions of organizations 
with various production systems. Stresses the identification of major problem 
areas associated with these functions such as aggregate planning, scheduling, 
man-machine systems, inventory control, etc., and the development of con- 
cepts and decision processes for dealing with the problems. Some modern 
quantitative techniques related to production management will be introduced. 
Prerequisite: Math 112, Economics 305 and Junior standing. 

481. Management Science I Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to operations research. Basic concepts of management sci- 
ence including selected quantitative models applicable to business administra- 
tion, allocating problems including linear programming and its extensions, 
game theory, inventory theory, and network models. Prerequisite: Economics 
310 and a course in calculus; Senior standing. 

520. Business Policy (Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 580) 

An integrative course that focuses on strategic planning, policy formulation, 
corporate-wide decision making. The terminal performance objectives of this 
course involve analysis of a complex organization in order to develop the abil- 
ity to: identify major problems and opportunities; to establish strategic objec- 
tives; and to recommend implementation plans and programs. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing. 

522. Personnel Management Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 569) 

The student is provided with various skills and techniques which are cur- 
rently employed in the practice of personnel management. The course covers 



Department of Business Administration 251 

developments in programs and activities pertaining to the management of hu- 
man resources with emphasis on the role of management. Topics include man- 
agement's responsibilities in dealing with people, the role of personnel man- 
agement, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, the exercise of au- 
thority, and others. Prerequisite: BA 422 

524. Management Simulation Credit 3(3-0) 

A seminar which focuses on simulating the operation of a complex business 
enterprise into a unified whole for analysis purposes. Emphasis on quantitative 
techniques utilized decision-making under uncertainty, market analysis and 
forecasting analysis, budgeting; interpersonal relationships, administration of 
the firm, goal-setting and policy formulation for the firm. Participants are di- 
vided into teams with key corporate duties being assigned and several teams 
compete against each other in an attempt to operate the firm on the optimum 
profitable basis. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

550. Financial Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Stresses the corporate financial officer's responsibilities for determining op- 
timal policies and procedures for capital budgeting under conditions of un- 
certainty, long-term financing, dividend distribution, mergers and acquisitions, 
and working capital management. A problem solving and/or case study ap- 
proach is used, but not to the exclusion of probing theoretical questions. Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 453. 

551. Financial Markets Credit 3(3-0) 

This course stresses the allocation, accumulation, and liquidity adjustment 
functions of financial markets. Financial tools such as flow-of funds data, port- 
folio theory, theories of financial structure of interest rates, and security pric- 
ing (valuation) techniques will be integrated into the course. Prerequisites: BA 
453 and Economics 415. 

552. Commercial Bank Management Credit 3(3-0 

Analyzes the operations of commercial banks, specifically, and other major 
financial institutions in general. Emphasis is placed on management decision- 
making processes. Through case analysis and problems, the student is intro- 
duced to cash, loan, deposit, investment, and management problems faced 
daily by managers of financial institutions. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 453 and Economics 415. 

555. Securities Analysis and Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course treats in much greater depth the security analysis and portfolio 
management problems introduced in the basis investments course, Business 
Administration 455. This treatment should be especially valuable for students 
preparing for careers which will involve (1) using or producing securities anal- 
yses and/ or (2) managing securities portfolios. Usually this means working 
with a financial institution, although the market for these skills is much broader. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 455 

557. Cases in Business Finance Credit 3(3-0 

A senior level course, designed for, but not restricted to, students who have a 
strong career interest in corporate financial management. The course utilizes 
cases and readings oriented toward short-term financial management prob- 



252 Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 

lems. The student is placed continuously in the position of the decision-make 
who must support his judgments by identifying each problem succinctly, mar- 
shalling appropriate data, analyzing the data, and ultimately arguing for one 
of the alternatives. Prerequisite: Business Administration 453 and Senior 
standing. 

610. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Transportation Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 610) 

Geared to current developments in urban transportation; an interdisciplinary 
course on urbanism and transportation. Prerequisite: Advances status in busi- 
ness administration, business education, accounting, economics, political sci- 
ence, sociology, or architectual engineering; Business Administration 470. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 
AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



Meada G. Shipman, Acting Chairperson 

The Department of Business Education and Administrative Services offers 
three undergraduate programs of study: (1) the preparation of comprehensive 
business education teachers, (2) the preparation of basic business education 
teachers, and (3) the administrative services area (formerly office administra- 
tion). 

BASIC BUSINESS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The basic business education curriculum is designed to develop students to 
teach basic business subjects at the secondary school level. The curriculum 
meets the certification requirements for the State of North Carolina. Each stu- 
dent is encouraged to take the National Teachers Examination. The Business 
Education and Administrative Services Department will be guided by the State's 
certification procedure in force. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Natural Science Electives 3-4 3-4 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Business Administration 220 3 — 

Business Education 302 1 — 2 

Physical Education — 1 

16-17 16-17 



Students who do not pass the Proficiency Test for Beginning Typewriting 
should enroll in BE 301, the prerequisite for BE 302. 



Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 253 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics 300, 301 3 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Psychology 320 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Speech 250 2 

Education 300, 301 2 

Business Education 334 2 

Health Education 200 2 

Electives 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3_ 

17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 422 3 

Business Administration 361 3 

Accounting 446 3 

Economics 305 3 

Education 400 3 

Business Administration 453 — 

Business Administration 360 — 

Business Administration 480 — 

Business Administration 430 — 

Electives 2_ 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3_ 
15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Business Education 574 1 

Education 637 — 

Education 500 — 

Education 560 — 

Business Administration 451 3 

Business Education 575-577 3 

Business Administration 520 3 

Business Education 579 3 

Electives _3_ 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
6 



12 



254 Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 

Major Program Requirements Semester Hours 

B.E. 575-577 Methods of Teaching the Business Subjects . 3 

Acct. 446 — Managerial Accounting 3 

B.A. 422 — Introduction to Management 3 

B A. 430— Principles of Marketing 3 

Econ. 305 — Elementary Statistics 3 

B.A. 453 — Business Finance 3 

B.A. 360 — Business Communication 3 

B.A. 361 — Introduction to Data Processing 3 

B.A. 451 — Principles of Business Law I 3 

B.E. 579— Personal Finance 3_ 

30 



COMPREHENSIVE BUSINESS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The comprehensive business education curriculum is designed to develop 
students to teach both skill and basic business subjects at the secondary school 
level. The curriculum meets the certification requirements for the State of 
North Carolina. Each student is encouraged to take the National Teachers Ex- 
amination. The Business Education and Administrative Services Department 
will be guided by the State's certification procedure in force. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Natural Science Electives 3-4 3-4 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Business Administration 220 — 3 

Business Education 302 1 2 — 

Physical Education 1 — 

16-17 16-17 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Economics 300, 301 3 3 

Accounting 221, 222 3 3 

Psychology 320 — 3 

Speech 250 2 — 

Business Education 332 2 — 3 

Business Education 334 2 — 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Health Education 200 _2 — 

17 17 



Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 255 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 422 3 

Business Administration 480 — 

Business Administration 453 — 

Business Administration 430 — 

Economics 305 3 

Business Administration 361 3 

Business Education 447 3 

Business Administration 360 — 

Education 400 3 

Electives _1 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 



16 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Business Education 574 1 

Education 637 — 

Business Administration 451 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 560 — 

Business Education 573 ■ 3 

Business Education 575-578 4 

Business Administration 520 2 

Business Education 579 _3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



Students who do not pass the Proficiency Test for Beginning Typewriting 
should enroll in BE 301, the prerequisite for BE 302. 

2 Students who do not pass the Proficiency Test for Shourthand I should enroll 
in BE 331, the prerequisite for BE 332. 



Major Program Requirements Semester Hours 

B.A. 453 — Business Finance 3 

BA. 430— Marketing 3 

BA. 360 — Business Communications 3 

Econ. 305 — Elementary Statistics 3 

B.A. 361 — Introduction to Data Processing 3 

B.E. 332— Shorthand II 3 

B.E. 447— Transcription 3 

B.E. 573 — Executary Administration 3 

B.E. 575-578 — Methods of Teaching the Business Subjects. . 4 

B.E. 302— Intermediate Typewriting _2 

30 



256 Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT TEACHING IN 
BUSINESS EDUCATION 

To be eligible for student teaching in both comprehensive business educa- 
tion and basic business education, the student must have met the following re- 
quirements: 

1. Senior Standing. 

2. Completed three-fourth of the number of hours required in basic business 
and economic courses. 

3. Completed three-fourth of the number of hours required in his/her subject 
matter major. 

4. Attained an average of 2.00 or better on all work undertaken in the Uni- 
versity, on all professional education courses undertaken and on all 
courses undertaken in the subject matter major. 

5. Possesses a personality deemed necessary for successful teaching. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CURRICULUM 

The administrative services curriculum is designed to develop personnel for 
managerial-level service roles as office executives and secretaries in business, 
professional, governmental, and industrial firms. 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 



Course and Number 

English 100, 101 

Mathematics 111, 112 

Natural Science 

Business Administration 220 
Business Education 302 1 

History 100, 101 

Physical Education 



Credit 
3 

4 

3-4 

3 

3 

1 

17-18 



Credit 

3 

4 

3-4 

2 
3 

1 

16-17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 — 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Speech 250 2 

Business Education 331, 332 3 

Business Education 334 — 

Economics 300, 301 3 

Electives 2-3 

16-17 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 

3 

3 
2 
3 

17 



Students who do not pass the Proficiency Test for Beginning Typewriting 
should enroll in BE 301, the prerequisite for BE 302. 



Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 257 



Junior Year 



Course and Number 
Business Administration 453 
Business Administration 360 
Business Administration 430 

Economics 305 

Business Administration 361 

Business Education 447 

Business Administration 422 
Business Administration 420 

Economic 415 

Elective (Nonbusiness) 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 

3 



15 



_3 
15 



Senior Year 



Course and Number 
Business Administration 480 
Business Administration 451 
Business Administration 520 

Business Education 573 

Business Education 574 

Business Administration 522 

Business Education 568 

Electives (Nonbusiness) 



Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 



3 
_6 
16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



_3 
12 



Major Program Requirements Semester Hours 

B.E. 568 — Office Organization and Management 3 

B.A. 361 — Introduction to Data Processing 3 

B.A. 422— Principles of Management 3 

B.E. 447— Transcription I 3 

B.E. 573— Executary Administration 3 

B.A. 453 — Business Finance 3 

B.A. 522— Personnel Management 3 

B.A. 360 — Business Communication 3 

Econ 305— Elementary Statistics 3 

Acct 222— Principles of Accounting _3 

30 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

A special cooperative arrangement between N. C. A & T State University 
and University of N. C. at Greensboro is available by which students obtain- 
ing degrees in business at A & T State University can design a program which 
would certify them to teach distributive education in secondary schools. For 
more information about this program, contact the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Business Education and Administrative Services. 



258 Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 

COURSES IN BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Undergraduate 

301. Beginning Typewriting. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly Office Administration 3301) 
Designated to develop a working knowledge of the use of the typewriter 
toward final mastery of keyboard reaches with drills, simple problems, and 
techniques of control. Requirement: 45 gwam. 

302. Intermediate Typewriting. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly Typewriting II) 

Emphasis on technical typewriting, tabulation reports, and other advanced 
practical applications. Requirements: 60 gwam. Prerequisite: Business Educa- 
tion 301. 

331. Gregg Shorthand I. Credit 3(2-1) 
Study of theory as outlined in Gregg Shorthand Diamond Jubilee Series. Re- 
quirement: 70 warn on practiced matter. Prerequisite: Business Education 
302. 

332. Gregg Shorthand II. Credit 3(2-1) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3332) 

Emphasis is placed on difficult dictation and transcription, speed tests, and 
reporting speeches. Requirements: 80 warn on new matter. Prerequisite: Busi- 
ness Education 301, 302. 

334. Business Machines. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly Office Administration 3334) 
Designed to develop concepts and skill in the use of modern office equip- 
ment. Prerequisite: Business Education 302. 

447. Transcription. 

(Formerly Office Administration 3347) 
Designed to review techniques and coordinate the skills of typewriting, 
shorthand, and English and promote desirable habits of performance. Inten- 
sive development of secretarial skill through timed dictation. Requirement: 
The production of mailable transcripts. Prerequisite: Business Education 331, 
332. 

568. Office Organization and Management Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3368) 

Treats principles and concepts of the scientific office management and the 
responsibility of management of office services. Prerequisite: BA 361 and Sen- 
ior Standing. 

573. Executary Administration Credit 3(2-1) 

(Formerly Secretarial Procedures) 

Discuss the qualifications, duties, and responsibilities of the secretary in the 
modern business office. Prerequisite: Business Education 301, 302, 331, and 
332. 



Department of Business Education and Administrative Services 259 

574. Coordinated Business Experience Credit 1(0-1) 

(Formerly Secretarial Internship) 

A program of observation and field work in selected business firms designed 
to contribute materially to the total development of the student's educational 
experiences. Prerequisite: Consultation with instructor and Junior Standing. 

575-578. Methods of Teaching the Business Subjects, Credit 4(4-0) 

(Comprehensive) 
Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials, and methods of teaching 
typewriting, shorthand, transcription, and related office skills. Provisions is 
made for observation and participation in demonstration teaching. Prere- 
quisite: Education 300, 301, 400, 500 (Concurrent); Psychology 320; BE 302, 
334, 447. 

575-577. Methods of Teaching the Business Subjects. (Basic) Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Education 3377) 
Selection, organization, and evaluation of supplementary teaching ma- 
terials and analysis of techniques in teaching bookkeeping, general busi- 
ness, business law, business structure, and elementary economics. Construction 
of teaching units, enrichment materials, and lesson plans for effective teach- 
ing on the secondary level. Prerequisite: Education 300-301, 400, 500 (Con- 
current); Psychology 320; BE 302, 334. 

579. Personal Finance Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3379) 
Treats the problems faced by individuals in managing personal incomes and 
expenditures. Stress is also placed upon credit, borrowing, and saving. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 301. 

581. Coordinating Techniques and 

Job Analysis in Cooperative Credit 3(3-0) 

Occupational Education Programs. 

A study of the role and responsibilities of the coordinator of occupational 
educational systems. Surveys the organizations of the office education pro- 
grams: the course content of the related class, supervision, on-the-job trainees, 
the establishment of working relationships among the school, business, 
and home; examines pertinent research; emphasizes procedures in job 
analyses. Prerequisite: Business Education 575-578, Senior Standing and 
Consultation with advisor. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 



Sidney H. Evans, Chairperson 

The Department of Economics offers a major in Economics with two options: 
one that is business oriented, and general economics, thus providing for con- 
siderable flexibility in the economics program. The Economics major programs 
are organized to equip students to pursue graduate study in the field, careers 



260 



Department of Economics 



in government service, industry and business. Both programs also provide an 
excellent background for the study of law. The Department of Economics also 
offers a major in Transportation and actively participates in the interdiscipli- 
nary manpower program. 

The Department of Economics offers faculty support for Agricultural Eco- 
nomics courses in cooperation with the School of Agriculture where the students 
can concentrate in Agri-Business or General Agricultural Economics. (See 
School of Agriculture.) 

Economics 300 (formerly 302) Micro Economics -Principles and Economics 
301, Macro Economics Principles are pre-requisites for all other courses in 
Economics and Agricultural Economics. The sequence of required courses for 
an individual student in any of the above options afer prerequisites have been 
met, will be recommended by student's advisor. 



REQUIRED COURSES* 3 FOR ECONOMICS MAJORS 



Course No. 
Economics 300 
Economics 301 
Economics 305 
Economics 310 
Economics 410 
Economics 412 
Economics 415 
Economics 420 
Economics 525 
Econ. Electives b 



Credit Hours Course Name 

3 Principles of Economics (micro) 

3 Principles of Economics (macro) 

3 Elementary Statistics 

3 Advanced Statistics 

3 Intermediate Economic Theory 

3 Quantitative Analysis 

3 Money and Banking 

3 National Income Analysis 

3 Economic Seminar 

3 



A grade of "C" or better must be obtained in these courses. 

Any course in Economics and Agricultural Economics, except Economics 601. 



PROGRAM FOR BUSINESS ECONOMICS MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 or 113 4 

History 100, 101 3 

Biological Science 4 

Physical Science — 

Business Administration 200 3 

Physical Education — 

Health Education 200 — 

17 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

4 

3 

3-4 



1 

2 

16-17 



Department of Economics 



261 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Physical Education 1 

Speech 250 — 

Humanities 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Economics 300, 301 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Business Administration 361 — 

16 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

2 
3 

3 

3 

_3 

17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 430, 453 3 

Economics 415 — 

Economics 305, 310 3 

Business administration 422 3 

Economics 410, 420 3 

Economics 412, Business Adminis- 
tration 360 _3 

15 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 

3 



_3 
15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 480, 520 3 3 

Business Administration 451, 

Economics 525 3 3 

Economics Electives 3 3 

Free Electives _6 J> 

(non-business and economics) 15 15 



PROGRAM FOR GENERAL ECONOMICS MAJORS 



Freshman Year 



Course and Number 

English 100, 101 

Mathematics 111, 112 or 113 

History 100, 101 

Biological Science 

Physical Science 

Business Administration 220, ROTC 
or elective 



Fall Semester Spring Semester 



Credit 

3 

4 

3 

3-4 



16-17 



Credit 
3 
4 
3 

3-4 



16-17 



262 



Department of Economics 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Health Education 200, Speech 250 2 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Economics 300, (formerly 302), 301 3 3 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Social Science Elective — _3 

15 15 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Economics 305, 310 3 

Economics 410, Business Administration 

361 or Math 240 3 

Economics 412 (formerly 304) 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 



Economics 420 — 




3 


Economics Electives 3 


3 


Social Science or Math Electives 3 

Economics 415 — 


3 


15 


15 


Senior Year 






Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 
Economics 525 — 


Spj 


•ing Semester 
Credit 
3 


Electives 3 15 


12-14 


15 




15-17 



a Fifteen semester hours should be taken the following disciplines: Mathemat- 
ics, Business Administration, Accounting, Political Science, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, Sociology, Anthropology, English or Education under advisement of 
the student's advisor in keeping with the student's career objectives. The re- 
maining hours may be pursued at the student's own volition. 



COURSES IN ECONOMICS 
Undergraduate 

300. Principles of Economics, (Micro) Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory approach to the principles of economics as they relate to in- 
dividual segments of the society. Emphasis will be placed on diminishing re- 
turns, supply, demand and market structures. 



301. Principles of Economics, (Macro) Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the meaning and scope of economics, economics termi- 
nology, and the basic principles as they apply to the whole economy. 



Department of Economics 263 

305. Elementary Statistics Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to descriptive statistics including data presentation, mea- 
sures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions; sampling 
distributions; and estimation. Prerequisite: Math 111. 

310. Advanced Statistics Credit 3(2-2) 

Introduction to classical hypothesis testing; decision theory; regression and 
correlation; and index numbers. Prerequisites: Econ. 305 

401. Public Finance Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis is made of the way federal, state, and local governments obtain and 
spend their revenues. Tax theories, incidence and impact are covered. Factors 
influencing government fiscal policies. 

405. History of Economic Thought Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the history of economic thought from the Middle Ages to John 
M. Keynes. The course aims to show how, and under what conditions the more 
important laws and theories become a part of the body of modern economics. 

410. Intermediate Micro Economic Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Theoretical analysis of consumer demand; production and costs; optimum 
output and pricing behavior under various market conditions; allocation of 
factors of production and distribution of income; general equilibrium and wel- 
fare economics. Prerequisite: Econ. 300 and junior standing. 

412. Quantitative Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 304) 

This course is intended to provide students with a solid foundation to basic 
mathematical methods employed in macro and micro economic theory. It in- 
cludes elementary application of calculus and analytical geometry, and ma- 
trix algebra to illustrate income — expenditure model, demand theory, produc- 
tion function, problems of cost minimization and profit maximization, and lin- 
ear programming. Prerequisites: Economics 300 & 301; Math 111, 112 or 113. 

415. Money and Banking Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the classical Keynesian and past Keynesian monetary 
theories. Also the foundations and practices of Federal monetary policies in 
achieving various macro goals. Prerequisite: Econ. 301 and junior standing. 

420. National Income Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to the modern theory of the determination of the level of in- 
come, employment, and prices; the various theories of money and interest; 
fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite: Econ. 301 and junior standing. 

425. Economics of Transportation Credit 3(3-0) 

Application of the tools of economics to the problems of the Transportation 
Industry with such topics as: economic regulation, cost-benefit, rate structure 
externalities and social vs individual decision making. 



264 Department of Economics 

426. Physical Distribution Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of alternative sources of transportation, economics of movement of 
goods, both in and out of the firm, integration of transportation with produc- 
tion flow, inventory management, warehousing, marketing policies, plant lo- 
cation, with special reference to location theory. 

501. Labor Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

An introductory course dealing with the efforts of working people to im- 
prove their relative position in the economy; the influence of unionism and of 
government participation are emphasized. The role of management. 

505. International Economic Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

National specilization and international exchange. The history and signifi- 
cance of international trade among nations of the world. 

510. Business Cycles Credit 3(3-0) 

The general instability of capitalism and its causes, seasonal fluctuations 
and the secular trend. Business cycle history and theories. The influence of 
cycles on government fiscal policy. 

512. Introduction to Econometrics Credit 3(3-0) 

Application of modern statistical procedures to theoretical economic models 
formulated in mathematical terms: computer applications and model testing: 
multivariate analysis, serial and auto correlation, estimation techniques and 
simulations. Prerequisite: Economics 412 or Math 112 and junior standing. 

515. Comparative Economic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

A description and analytical study of the various systems that have developed 
in different countries at different times, motivations, production and distribu- 
tion patterns. 

520. Economic Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the problem of economic growth and development in 
modern times and analyzes the present efforts to increase the rate of economic 
growth. Selected case studies will be drawn from both highly developed na- 
tions and lesser developed nations. Special emphasis will be given to dispro- 
portioned growth in sectors of the United States Economy. 

525. Economics Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

The use of economic tools in delineating, analyzing and presenting economic 
problems that are not included in other courses. This course will include also 
an exposure to recent development in economics. 

599. Independent Study Credit 3 or 6 

The course is designed for students involved in Cooperative Work-Study 
Program where the length and nature of their involvement warrants the award- 
ing of such credit. The following conditions must be met in order to receive 
credit: (1) The credit will be determined by the department chairman at the 
time of registration; (2) the student must be registered at the University during 
the off-campus assignment; (3) the student should spend a minimum of three 



Department of Economics 265 

months in the off campus experience for each three semester hours of academic 
credit. When the off-campus experience is in the form of seminar exposure, 
then not less than forty -five (45) clock hours should represent three semester 
hours of academic credit; (4) the student will be required to present a written 
report and or other evaluation criterion chat will be evaluated by the super- 
vising teacher. Any special problem or technical report pursued by the student 
will be subject to prior approval by the department chairmand or supervising 
teacher. Prerequisite: Consent of the advisor and or department chairman. 



COURSES OFFERED TO ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

601. Economic Understanding Credit 3(3-0) 

An introduction to he principles of economics utilizing the macro approach. 
No credit towards a degree in economics. 

602. Manpower Problems and Prospects Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of manpower development problems and prospects, with par- 
ticular reference to the problems of unemployment, underemployment and dis- 
crimination. The course will focus on problem measurement, evaluation of ex- 
isting policy and prospects for achievement of all human resource develop- 
ment. The course will invite an interdisciplinary participation on the part of 
students and faculty. Prerequisites: Econ. 301 or 302: Econ. 305 or equivalent 
or consent of instructor. 

603. Manpower Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Manpower planning center chiefly on the adjustment necessary to adapt la- 
bor resources to changing job requirements. This course is designed to prepare 
students to create plans which will facilitate this adjustment. This course will 
attempt to acquaint the student with labor force and labor market behavior 
such that he is able to make planning decisions relating to job creation (in- 
creasing demand) and education and training (increasing supply). Planning 
will be done at both the national (macro) and local (micro) levels, with special 
emphasis on the latter. We will further attempt to evaluate all planning deci- 
sions by use of Cost-Benefit Analysis and or Multivariate Analysis. Prerequi- 
site: Econ. 301 or 302; Econ. 305 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

604. Economics Evaluation Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

The course will cover needed tools of research design, statistical reporting, 
cost benefit analysis and other related techniques for internal and external 
evaluations of human resource development programs. The course is designed 
both for inservice personnel currently employed by agencies, and for the regu- 
lar student enrolled in a degree-granting program. 

610. Consumer Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature, scope and 
tools of consumer economics. It is particularly oriented to minority groups, thus 
focusing on the economic choices currently affecting groups with rising in- 
comes and aspirations. This course will consider the economic choices faced 
by the consumers in maximizing satisfaction with limited means. 



266 Department of Economics 

615. Economic, Political and Social Aspects Credit 3(3-0) 

of the Black Experience 

A study of the political economic and social tools of current public policy 
treating the subject of race in America. The course will examine the economic 
and social conditions of income inequality and explore the national commit- 
ment to equal opportunity. Special emphasis will be placed on illustrations 
from North Carolina and adjacent states. 

690. Special Topics in Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of problems and analytical techniques in economics. The 
pursuit of certain specific or problem oriented area in economics not covered 
in other courses. Course content may vary from semester to semester. May not 
be repeated for credit. 



COURSES OFFERED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS 

701. Labor and Industrial Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

To important sectors of the economy are examined — Labor and Management. 
Historical, public and governmental influences are studies. 

705. Government Economic Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will consider the growth of public expenditures and revenues, 
and debt of the United States: theories of taxation and tax incidence; and the 
effects of public expenditures and taxes on economic growth. 

710. Economic Development and Resource Use Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with resource and economic development in the domestic 
economy and also a comparison drawn among developed, developing and un- 
developed societies. 

720. Development of Economic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

An analytical approach to the study of various Economic systems, how these 
systems developed and how they are organized to carry on economic activity. 



MANPOWER CONCENTRATION FOR ECONOMICS MAJORS 

The Department of Economics offers a manpower concentration which pro- 
vides an understanding of manpower planning, manpower program evaluation, 
and manpower administration. In this concentration, students gain expertise 
in coping with problems of employment and additional skills for careers in 
state, city and county government, federal agencies, private industry, as well 
as community manpower agencies. 

Students interested in the manpower concentration should pursue the follow- 
ing module by successfully completing the entire core requirement and select- 
ing a minimum of two electives. 



Department of Economics 



267 



MANPOWER CONCENTRATION MODULE 





Required Courses 




Electives 


Econ. 


602 Manpower Problems 


Econ. 


604 Evaluation Methods 




& Prospects 


Psych. 


544 Psychological Testing 


Econ. 


603 Manpower Planning 


Psych. 


444 Applied Psychology 


B.A. 


522 Personnel Management 


Sociol. 


600 Seminar on Social 


Sociol. 


405 Sociology of Work & 




Planning 




Occupations 


Psych. 


600 Introduction to 


Sociol. 


302 Economics 305, or 




Guidance 




Psychology 322, 


Psych. 


645 Behavior Modification 




Statistics 


Sociol. 


309 Disability and 


Psych. 


445 Industrial Psychology 




Employment 


Econ. 


599 Independent Study 







TRANSPORTATION MAJOR 

The Department of Economics will offer an undergraduate major in trans- 
portation beginning the fall semester, 1977. The new major in transportation 
will offer greater opportunities for students who are desirous of pursuing ca- 
reers in areas related to transportation. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR TRANSPORTATION MAJORS 



Course Number 

Transportation 360 
Transportation 450 
Transportation 550 
Economics 310 
Economics 410 
Economics 425 
Economics 426 



Credits Course Name 

3 Introduction to Transportation 

3 Motor Carrier Management 

3 Transportation Law 

3 Advanced Statistics 

3 Intermediate Econ. Theory 

3 Economics of Transportation 

3 Physical Distribution 



Transportation Electives' 



Transportation 460 
Transportation 560 
Business Administration 470 
Business Administration 610 

Drivers Education 558 

Drivers Education 654 

Economics 599 



3 Traffic Management 

3 National Transportation Policy 

3 Urban Transportation Concepts 

3 Interdisciplinary Seminar in 

Trans portation 
3 Introduction to Highway 

Traffic Administration 
3 Highway and Transportation 

Systems 
3 Independent Study 



'The student will select three courses from this list 



268 Department of Economics 

TRANSPORTATION MAJOR 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112, or 113 4 4 

Natural Science Elective 3-4 

Natural Science Elective — 3.4 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Business Administration 220 — 3 

Health Education 200 or 

Physical Activity 2 

15-16 16-17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Economics 300, 301 3 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

General Psychology 320 3 — 

Speech 250 2 — 

Accounting 221, 222 3 3 

Statistics, Econ. 305, 310 3 3 

Transportation 360 — _3 

17 15 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 422, 451 3 3 

Business Administration 430, 480 3 3 

Business Administration 361, 453 3 3 

Economics 415 3 — 

Economics 410 3 — 

Economics 425 — 3 

Transportation 450 — _3 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Transportation 550 3 — 

Business Administration 520 — 3 

Economics 426 3 — 

Free Electives 

(not in Business & Economics) 3 6 

Transportation Electives 6 3 

English 300 — _3 

15 15 



Department of Economics 269 

COURSES IN TRANSPORTATION 

TR 360. Introduction to Transportation Credit 3(3-0) 

Survey of the historic development and Socio-Economic impact of our na- 
tion's transportation system, and the interelatedness of the several modes 
(water, air, rail, motor and pipeline). 

TR 450. Motor Carrier Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to the practical application of management practices and pol- 
icies in the Motor Carrier Sector of the Transportation Industry. Case studies 
are used. 

TR 460. Traffic Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Concepts and problems of freight traffic management, rate-making theories; 
rate and classification systems. 

TR 550. Transportation Law Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of the Interstate Commerce Act and, laws governing liabilities, 
claims and safety in the Transportation industry, contracts and bailment. 

TR 560. National Transportation Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

Seminar on national transportation problems. 



TRANSPORTATION MINOR 

The Department of Economics administers a minor in transportation former- 
ly administered by the Transportation Institute, which may be taken by any 
student in any academic department who can fit the requirements into their 
program. Students who take the minor will be prepared for graduate programs 
in transportation or selected careers in the transportation industry. Students 
interested in the minor should consult with the Chairperson of the Department 
of Economics. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

S. Joseph Shaw, DEAN and DIRECTOR 
of Teacher Education 

The School of Education provides opportunities for students to prepare for 
teaching careers in the elementary (K-3) and secondary schools of the state and 
for other professional careers in industry and government. The programs of 
study are planned to allow the students to attain competence in both specialized 
and general areas of Education. 

The School of Education includes the following departments: Education, Ed- 
ucational Psychology and Guidance, Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
Media and the Division of Industrial Education and Technology which com- 
prises the departments of Industrial Education and Industrial Technology. In 
addition to these departments, the School includes the Department of Adult 
Education and Community Services, the Reading Center and the Center of 
Driver and Safety Education. 

All professional teacher education programs are administered and super- 
vised by the School of Education. The Schools of Education and Graduate 
Studies cooperate with the graduate teacher education programs. Moreover, 
the School of Education serves as the central agency for administering all 
teacher education programs for undergraduates. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of one of the undergraduate programs of- 
fered by the School of Education in cooperation with other departments of the 
University, the student is eligible to receive the degree of Bachelor of Science 
with a major in one of the following areas: Agricultural Education, Art Educa- 
tion, Biology Education, Business Education, Chemistry Education, Early 
Childhood Education, English Education, French, History, Home Economics 
Education, Industrial Education, Mathematics Education, Music Education, 
Physical Education, Physics Education, Social Studies, Recreation, and Media 
Education. 



THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The program of teacher education seeks to improve the equality of education 
available to the youth of North Carolina through improved preparation of 
teachers and other school personnel including administrators, guidance coun- 
selors and supervisors. To that end, it offers both undergraduate and graduate 
programs of professional study which represent a continuum with similar gen- 
eral goals. The program seeks, therefore, to realize these goals. 

(1) to prepare persons to take their places as competent members of the pro- 
fession of education; and 

(2) to provide opportunities for advanced study for school personnel already 
established in education. 

In order to carry out general goal "Number One" of the Teacher Education 
Program as listed above, these objectives have been established: 

1. Plan experiences for students in teacher education which will include the 
development of persons as individuals as well as specialists in a chosen 
academic area. 



274 School of Education 

2. Plan learning environments conducive to appropriate stimulation for de- 
veloping needed competencies in the following areas: 

Personal Development 
Social Development 
Professional Development 
Citizenship maturity 

3. Provide the highest level of instructional development by way of well 
qualified teaching and research personnel who can provide integrated 
experiences for teacher education students, that will make it possible for 
them to gain personal, social and academic competencies in the practice 
of the education profession. 

4. Design an organizational structure to delineate and describe those com- 
petencies which will assure for teacher education students a quality ex- 
perience specifically related to the vocational specialty they will be ex- 
pected to practice. 

5. Plan all program development, evaluation, and supervision so that ex- 
periences gained are clearly oriented to the pre-service dimension of the 
Teacher Education Program. 

As the teacher education unit observes general goal "Number Two", the fol- 
lowing objectives have been established: 

1. Plan programs for graduate level students which will involve competen- 
cies already developed and which are being practiced, and infuse addi- 
tional high level experiences that will give definite meaning to the com- 
petencies being sought. 

2. Provide a learning environment which will stimulate in advanced stu- 
dents the desire to delineate and articulate those competencies in their 
respective specialties that will insure for them a high level of performance 
in the practice of their chosen vocation. 

3. Emphasize those competencies which are necessary for all advanced stu- 
dents in education. Such competencies would allow advanced students 
to have extensive and intensive experiences in research. 

4. Plan and assess measurable competencies of advanced students which 
will permit these students to attain levels of leadership commensurate 
with graduate level expectations. 

The office of the Registrar in collaboration with the office of the Director 
of Teacher Education is the central agency vested with the authority and 
responsibility to certify to the State Department of Public Instruction stu- 
dents who are to be recommended by the Institution for certification in the 
following fields: 

1. Agricultural Education 11. Industrial Arts Education 

2. Arts 12. Mathematics 

3. Biology 13. Media 

4. Early Childhood Education 14. Music 

5. Business Education 15. Physical Education 

6. Chemistry 16. Physics 

7. English 17. Social Sciences 

8. Foreign Languages 18. Vocational Industrial 

9. History Education 

10. Home Economics Education 19. Safety & Driver Education 



School of Education 275 

In recognition of this function, the approval or endorsement of the depart- 
ment providing courses in the subject matter areas in which the candidate is to 
be certified must be secured prior to the approval or endorsement of the Di- 
rector. The University reserves the right to refuse to recommend any appli- 
cants for certificates when they are deficient in mental or physical health, 
scholarship, character, or other qualifications deemed necessary for success 
in the profession of education. 

The program in teacher education is divided into three separate but inter- 
related phases: (1) general education; (2) subject-matter specialization; and 
(3) professional education. Effective September 7, 1972, the new competency- 
based teacher education program approach was adopted by the State Board of 
Education. This approach will be gradually phased into the current approved 
program in the University. 

General Education 

The general education phase of the Teacher Education Program functions 
to provide experience and learning which meet the fundamental needs of all 
teachers, both in the role of teacher and citizen in a democracy. General 
education provides for the student the understanding, the knowledge, the 
appreciation, and the sensitivity attainable through the study of a broad range 
of materials and concepts ranging across the humanities, the arts, the social 
sciences, the natural sciences and mathematics. It provides a broad under- 
standing of the cultural heritage and of the physical and social environments. 

Subject- Matter Specialization 

Experiences of students in the subject-matter specialization area are de- 
signed to develop a high level of subject competence in those who later will 
seek certification in their respective specialities. Subject-matter specializa- 
tion provides opportunities for the student to understand the theoretical basis 
upon which subject content is developed and organized. It also provides the 
student an opportunity to accumulate and to understand a vast body of facts 
which comprises one's selected discipline. The function of knowledge in the 
development of mature scholarship is emphasized in this segment of the 
prospective teacher's experiences also. 

Professional Education 

The professional education phase .of the Teacher Education Program is de- 
signed to induct the prospective teacher into the profession of education. 
During this segment of the student's experience he develops definable com- 
petence in the following: 

1. Understanding the school as a social system with structures, functions, 
and special goals. 

2. Understanding the learner (student) as a dynamic and unique personality 
capable of wide variation in behavioral adjustment. 

3. Understanding the functional nature of human learning, how to diagnose 
and assess it, and how it takes place in individual and group settings, 
especially in organized school environments. 

4. Understanding what resources facilitate learning and how these re- 
sources may be effectively used in a learning-teaching environment. 



276 School of Education 

5. Understanding the processes at work between the school and the wider 
society which have influenced the learning-teaching situation, historically. 

6. Understanding effective techniques and strategies for enhancing learning 
among students who have a wide range of needs, abilities and interests. 

7. Understanding the education profession as a medium through which con- 
tinuous individual development of the teacher is paramount in order to 
maintain accountability to himself, to the students he will teach, to the 
profession proper, and to society in general. 



Teacher Education Admission and Retention Standards 

Admission 

The Teacher Education Council makes all policies governing the entire 
Teacher Education Program; therefore, admission, retention, and exit pro- 
cedures are reviewed by the council. To be admitted to the Teacher Education 
Program a student should file an application with the chairman of the academic 
department in which he plans to major during his sophomore year. The stu- 
dent must have an overall grade point average of 2.00 and a major field aver- 
age of 2.00 before he can be admitted to the Program. 

Prior to his fourth semester in residence each applicant must satisfy the 
following requirements: 

1. Successfully complete Mathematics 101 and 102 or 111. 

2. Successfully complete English 100, 101, and Speech 250 with a grade of 
"C" or better in each course. 

2. Take a personality inventory test. 

4. Show evidence of good health. A statement from a physician is neces- 
sary. The health of a prospective teacher should not restrict his ability as 
a teacher. The details regarding what constitutes health not good enough 
for a teacher will be determined in consultation with the Student Health 
Director. 

5. Demonstrate his ability to use the English language effectively. 

Generally, during the fourth semester of a student's residence, his com- 
plete profile will be examined by the Teacher Education Director. At this time, 
the student must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00 before the 
Teacher Education Director will approve his application for Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Retention 

To remain in the Teacher Education Program, the student must maintain 
an academic average of 2.00 in the areas in which he seeks certification and in 
professional education. In addition, a student must repeat any required major 
field course or professional education course, except General Psychology or 
Introduction to Education, when he earns a grade of "D". The repetition will 
not be considered in the hours required for graduation but the hours and the 
grade for the repetition will be included in the determination of the overall 
grade point average. 

Should a student's academic average fall below 2.00 in either the area he 
seeks certification or the area of professional eeucation, he will be placed on 



School of Education 277 

probation or dropped from the Teacher Education Program, depending 
on the level to which his academic marks fall. 

Once a student has been dropped from the Teacher Education Program 
because of poor scholarship, he may reapply with the Director of Teacher 
Education providing his academic average has returned to 2.00 in the area he 
seeks certification and/ or in the area of professional education. 

Readmission to Teacher Education Program 

Once a student has been dropped from the Teacher Education Program for 
any reason, the following steps must be taken before a student will be read- 
mitted to the Teacher Education Program: 

1. The student must file a formal application for readmittance to the Teacher 
Education Program with the Director of Teacher Education. 

2. The Director of Teacher Education must bring the application of the stu- 
dent along with the student's complete profile before the Teacher Edu- 
cation Council for action. 

3. The Director of Teacher Education will formally notify, in writing, the 
student, Department Chairman, Dean of the School involved and the 
Chief Officer of Academic Affairs of the action of the Teacher Education 
Council with reference to the student's application for readmission to 
the Teacher Education Program. 

Transfers to the Teacher Education Program 

Transfer policies refer to the student who starts his college program in an 
academic area (such as mathematics or chemistry) and decides to become a 
teacher late in his college career. The following requirements are necessary 
for admittance to the Teacher Education Program under these conditions: 

1. The student must have satisfied the general education requirements. 

2. The student must have a 2.00 grade point average in his academic work 
and the general education program. 

3. The student must apply formally to be admitted to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Program. Application will be made to the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment in which he plans to major. 

4. The student must meet the same criteria as are recommended for other 
students in Suggested Policies Governing Admission to the Teacher 
Education Program. 

5. The Chairman of the Academic Department has the responsibility of en- 
rolling the student in the Teacher Education Program after the student 
has met all requirements. 

Certification 

When the student completes the Teacher Education sequence of experi- 
ences, he must apply for state certification by (1) requesting a certification 
application form from the Office of the Director of Teacher Education, and (2) 
requesting a copy of his official transcript from the Registrar's Office to be 
attached to the application and submitted to the Division of Certification in 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 



278 Department of Education 

The student is requested to take the National Teacher Examination, both the 
Common and the Teaching Area Examinations, and he must have these scores 
placed on file in the Teacher Education Office. Modifications of certification 
will be made gradually as the new exit criteria and competency-based program 
approved by the State Board of Education are phased into the pre-service pro- 
gram. 

Irregular Certification 

Occasionally students will need to be certified under the provision of "ir- 
regular certification." This provision is made primarily for students who are 
classified in the following categories: 

1. One who completes an academic program of studies other than teacher 
education. 

2. One who seeks initial certification in North Carolina from another state 
provided he/she does not qualify for certification under the "reciprocity" 
provision between the state of North Carolina and other selected states. 
A student does not need to be recommended by this institution for certi- 
fication under the reciprocity provision; he/she makes direct contact 
with the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction in Ra- 
leigh relative to his/her certification problem. 

Anyone seeking a recommendation for certification under the "irregular 
certification" provision must contact the Office of the Director of Teacher 
Education for appropriate directions. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Dorothy M. Prince, Chairman 

The Department of Education offers a major in Early Childhood Education 
for prospective teachers of kindergarten through grade three. The department 
also provides professional studies and cooperates with the various academic 
departments of the University for the preparation of secondary school and spe- 
cial subjects teachers. 

At the graduate level, the department offers curricula leading to Master of 
Science in Education degrees in early childhood education, intermediate edu- 
cation, elementary education, educational administration, curriculum — instruc- 
tion, and reading. It also provides professional studies for graduate teacher 
education programs with the various academic departments. 

Early Childhood Education 

The Early Childhood Education program is designed to develop profes- 
sional competencies and understandings needed to teach in kindergarten 
through grade 3. The program is interdisciplinary and requires a minimum 
of 124 semester credit hours. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum leads to 
the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education degree and to North 
Carolina teacher certification in K-3. 

The program aims to develop prospective teachers who will realize the 
importance of change and the need for continued learning. Specific objectives 
of the program are: 



Department of Education 279 

1. To produce socially sensitive teachers who understand and are willing to 
assume their responsibility to society. 

2. To provide opportunities for prospective teachers to develop the ability 
to think critically, analytically, and creatively in dealing with the needs 
of learners. 

3. To provide the prospective teacher with a broad experience in general 
education including the disciplines of the humanities, sciences, and social 
science. 

4. To prepare competent teachers for grades K-3 through a strong inter- 
disciplinary curriculum. 

5. To provide for the knowledge and understanding of the learning process; 
human growth and development; sociological, historical, and philosophical 
foundations of American education. 

6. To provide opportunities for professional laboratory experience and the 
application of instructional methodology, curriculum content, and 
utilization of organizational patterns in grades K-3. 

7. To develop an understanding of the purpose, organization, and adminis- 
tration of school systems with emphasis on the role of the teacher in the 
total education program. 

Suggested Sequence for Early Childhood Education 



Course and Number 

English 100, 101 

History 204, 205 

Mathematics 111 or Math 101, 102 

Education 100 

Physical Science 100, 110 . . 
Physical Education 101, 102 

Political Science 230 

Geography 210 or 200 

Elective 3 

Total 15 17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Child Development 311 3 — 

Zoology, 160, 461 4 4 

Speech 250 2 — 

Anthropology 200 — 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

Electives _— _ _3_ 

Total 17 15 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Credit 
3 


Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 


3 


3 


, 102 — 
1 


4 


4 




1 


1 




3 




3 



280 Department of Education 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Education 451, 644 2 3 

Music 609 3 — 

Art 600 3 — 

Education 315 — 3 

Education 436 3 — 

Education 660 — 3 

Education 635 — 3 

Physical Education 462 2 — 

English 220 or 430 3 — 

Electives (Q 6 

Total 18 18 



Course and Number 
Block I 

Education 519 


Senior Year 


Fall Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
6 

12 


Spring Semester 
Credit 


Food & Nutrition 632 or 535 

Electives 

Block II 

Education 556 




3 


Education 557 




3 


Education 558 or 560 


Total 


_6_ 
12 



PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

The professional studies component of the teacher education program is 
designed to provide for the development of those professional understandings 
and abilities which are essential to the professional role of a teacher. 

Approximately eighteen percent of the undergraduate curriculum con- 
stitutes the professional studies component. Specific teacher competencies are 
developed through the provision of (1) a study of the processes and theories 
of human growth development, learning and teaching with field experi- 
ences; (2) a humanistic study of the problems, issues and trends in education 
within a historical, philosophical, sociological, economic, and governmental 
framework; (3) instruction and experiences in creating and using learning 
environments; (4) a study of the processes and techniques for analyzing and 
evaluating the teaching learning environment; and (5) experiences for the 
acquisition of knowledge, attitudes, and skills for positive human and social 
relationships. 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Spring 

Ed. 300 2 Ed. 301 2 

Psy. 320 3 — 

- 2 



Department of Education 281 

Junior Year 

Fall Spring 

Ed. 400 -_3 Ed. 436 ^_3 

3 3 

Senior Year 

Fall Spring 

*Ed. 500 3 *Ed. 500 3 

*Ed. 535, 536 3 *Ed. 535, 536 3 

Ed. 637 3 Ed. 637 3 

*Ed. 560 _6 *Ed. 560 _6 

15 15 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

100. Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Education 2100) 
A familiarization with methods of improving study, taking notes and using 
the library. 

300. Introduction to Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Education 2120) 

An overview of the historical background of the systems of education in 
the United States, their aims, organization and procedures, and of the principles 
and practices on all levels of the American educational system; emphasis on 
the requirements of North Carolina. 

301. Philosophical and Sociological Foundations 

of Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Education 2121) 
A view of the educative process and its philosophical foundations; em- 
phasis on the philosophical implications of education as they relate to the 
pupil, curriculum, teacher, and the institution. 

302. Field Experiences and Community Services. Credit 1-3 
Field experiences as tutor, assistant, participant or employee in a school or 

education related institution, organization, agency, community, church, busi- 
ness, or industrial program involving interaction with children, youth or adults. 
Evaluation and written reports required. Planned in consultation with an in- 
structor. 

303. Socio-Philosophical Aspects of Education. Credit 4(4-0) 
An examination of past and contemporary factors in American Education 

through philosophical and sociological perspectives. Exploration of problems 
and possibilities inherent in relating theory and practice in education. 



♦Professional Black-Students except those taking library science courses are restricted to 12 semester hours 
during the student teaching semester. 



282 Department of Education 

315. Family, Community, and School. Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of the relationships of the family, community, and school that in- 
volve the learner, with emphasis on the young child. Attention to family struc- 
ture, parent education and involvement with the school and community; com- 
munity development and participation in education. Consideration of re- 
search, and identification of current problems and issues. Observations and 
projects. 

343. Methods and Materials of Bibliography. Credit 2(2 0) 

An examination and evaluation of the principles and methods of biblio- 
graphic planning with emphasis on library skills and research techniques. 

400. Psychological Foundations of Education- 
Growth and Development Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2154 — Restricted to Teacher Education Students) 
Psychological principles governing the interests and needs of preadole- 
scence and adolescence; emphasis is placed on general principles of growth 
and development; physical, motor, intellectual, social, emotional and moral 
aspects. Observing, recording and interpreting human behavior including 
functional conceptions of learning will be provided in laboratory settings. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 320, Education 300, 301. 

402. Extramural Studies I. Credit 1-3 

Off-campus experiences, testing or exploring relevance of education to real 
world situations in an agency, organization, institution or business. Project 
report and evaluation by permission of department. 

413. Learning and Practice. Credit 3(3-0) 

Survey and analysis of learning theories and the learning process with ap- 
plications to education. Integration of theoretical viewpoints and research 
findings with observations and experience in classroom situations. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 320. 



436. Tests and Measurements. Credit 3(2-2) 

A basic study of standardized and teacher-made measuring devices, accept- 
able methods of selecting, administering, and interpreting all types of tests 
applicable to the school and classroom. 

451. Foundations of Early Childhood Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

The study of the historical background and the sociological, philosophical, 
economic factors, and current issues relating to early childhood education; the 
physical plant, equipment, supplies and other facilities necessary for appro- 
priate experiences. 

500. Principles and Curricula of Secondary Schools. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education 2140) 
The history, nature, and function of the secondary school and its relation- 
ship to the elementary school and adult life. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in 
education and psychology. 



Department of Education 283 

501. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health and Physical 

Education. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 2160) 
The use of various research methods as applied to health education and 
physical education and the study of methods of evaluating biological, social 
and physiological outcomes for health education and physical education. Ele- 
mentary statistical procedures are utilized. Prerequisite: Psychology 436. 

510. Teaching Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
Methods, content, resources, and materials for teaching speaking, listening, 

writing and spelling in grades 4-9. 

511. Teaching Reading in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
Basic course in the methods, materials, and techniques used in reading in- 
struction from the primary area through the study skills techniques of high 
school. An examination of learning and the teaching of reading in light of cur- 
riculum adjustment and procedures for developing expanding reading skills 
in grades 4-9. Prerequisite: Psychology 451. 

512. Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
The instructional program in the social studies. Emphasis on current methods, 

organization, materials, and resources. 

513. Strategies in Teaching Science in the Intermediate Credit 2(2-0) 
Grades. 

The examination design, and evaluation of experiences for teaching science in 
grades 4-9. 

514. Strategies in Mathematics Instruction for the 

Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods, materials, resources and evaluation for teaching modern math- 
ematics in grades 4-9. 

519. Preschool Materials, Methods, and Practicum. Credit 3(1-4) 

Methods, materials and program planning for the preschool child. Attention 
to staffing scheduling, and curriculum planning. Directed observation and 
participation in an established preschool program as a day care center, 
nursery or kindergarten. 

525. Methods of Teaching Art. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2149) 

A study of the aims, objectives, methods and techniques of art teaching in 
the modern schools. Special attention given to planning courses of material 
and correlation. Required of those wishing to qualify as art teachers. Prere- 
quisites: 30 hours of Art and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

526. Methods of Teaching English. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2144) 

A study of materials and methods of teaching English in the high school. 
Required of those planning to teach English. Prerequisite: English 450, 430, 24 



284 Department of Education 

additional hours of English courses above English 100 and 15 semester hours in 
Education and Psychology. 

527. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2148) 

A study of the problems and difficulties experienced in teaching foreign 
languages. Special attention given to the matter of classroom aids, equip- 
ment, etc. Required of those students planning to teach the subject. Prere- 
quisites: 27 hours of French and 15 semester hours of Education and Psy- 
chology. 

528. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2151) 

A study of the objectives, methods, and techniques necessary for teaching 
vocational homemaking on the secondary level. 

529. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2147) 

An evaluation of subject matter, materials, methods and techniques and ob- 
jectives in the teaching of mathematics in the junior and senior high school. 
Required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 30 hours of 
mathematics and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

530. Public School Music Methods. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Education 2141) 

A comprehensive study of materials and methods in the teaching of public 
school music. 

531. Vocal Methods and Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2142) 

The teaching of vocal music in the public schools: vocal literature for vocal 
combinations in the public schools. 

532. Band Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2145) 

A study of school band organization and administration. (Fall) 

533. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly Education 2143) 

A study of materials, methods and practice in planning, organizing and 
conducting physical education class activities. Prerequisites: Phy. Ed. 446 and 
an adequate number of other physical education courses. 

534. The Teaching of Health Education. Credit 2(2-1) 
(Formerly Physical Education 2163) 

Methods, materials and procedures for the teaching of health in the ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. Prerequisites: Health Education 220 and 442. 



Department of Education 285 

535. Methods of Teaching Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2150) 

A study of methods, materials and techniques of teaching such subjects as 
Biology, Chemistry, Physics, General Science, and Environmental Science in 
the high school. Required of all those planning to teach in this field. Prere- 
quisite: 27 hours of Science and 15 semester hours of Education and Psy- 
chology. 

536. Methods of Teaching Social Sciences. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2146) 

A study of techniques of social science instruction on the high school level. 
Required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 27 hours of 
Social Studies and 15 semester hours of Education and Psychology. 

539. Methods of Teaching Speech. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the aims, objectives, problems and difficulties experienced in 
teaching speech in the modern school. Special attention is given to the or- 
ganization and coordination of both speech and theater curriculums, to plan- 
ning courses of study, its presentation, and to the selection of materials and 
equipment required of all Speech and Theater Education majors. Prerequisites: 
27 hours of speech and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

556. Curriculum and Methods in Literature, Language Arts, and 
Social Studies in Early Childhood Education Credit 3(2-2) 

The study of basic principles underlying the social studies and language arts 
curriculum; children's literature; appropriate materials and methods for kin- 
dergarten-primary grades. Development of concepts and skills relating to the 
scope and importance of social studies and language arts in the total pro- 
gram. Laboratory and observation experiences. 

557. Curriculum and Methods in Science and Mathematics in 

Early Childhood Education. Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic principles underlying the science and mathematics curriculum. Con- 
sideration of appropriate materials and methods for kindergarten through 
primary grades. Development of concepts and skills relating to the scope and 
importance of science and mathematics in the schools programs. Laboratory 
and observation experiences. 

558. Student Teaching and Seminar in Early Childhood 
Education. Credit 6(2-8) 

Observation and guided teaching experiences in the preschool laboratory 
and in kindergarten through grade three. Seminar experiences throughout 
the term. Prerequisite: Overall GPA of 2.00. 

559. Student Teaching and Seminar. Credit 6(2-8) 
Actual teaching experiences under supervision in grades 4-9; seminar before, 

during and after field experiences. Prerequisites: Education 300, 303, 400, and 
Psychology 436, and Education 510-514. 



286 Department of Education 

560. Observation and Student Teaching. Credit 6(2-8) 
(Formerly Education 2161) 

The application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of in- 
struction in a real classroom situation under supervision, includes purpose- 
ful observation; organization of teaching materials; participation in other 
activities which will aid in developing a teacher (guidance activities, child 
accounting, co-curricular activities, parent-teacher associations, teacher's 
meetings), and ninety or more clock hours of actual teaching. Prerequisites: 
Overall GPA of 2.00 in both the professional sequence and the academic se- 
quences major and minor areas of specialization; Ed. 500, Principles and 
Curricula of Secondary Schools Ed. 525-536, Methods of Teaching, Ed. 637 or 
Ed. 556 and 557 . . . completed or taken concurrently. 

561. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
A consideration of selected topics and current trends in the field of educa- 
tion. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Extramural Studies II. Credit 1-3 

Off-campus experiences with educational programs of agencies, organiza- 
tions, institutions or business which gives first hand experiences with youth 
and adults and aspects of education. Project report and evaluation by per- 
mission of department. 

625. Theory of American Public Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2180) 

An examination of the philosophical resources, objectives, historical in- 
fluences, social organization, administration, support, and control of public 
education in the United States. 

626. History of American Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2184) 

A study of the historical development of education in the United States 
emphasizing educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, 
social, and cultural developments in the growth of a system of public educa- 
tion. 

627. The Afro-American Experience in American Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2181) 

Lectures, discussions, and research in the Afro-American in American 
education including the struggle for literacy, contributions of Afro-Americans 
to theory, philosophy and practice of education in the public schools, private 
and higher education. Traces the development of school desegregation, its 
problems, and plans. 

628. Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education. Credit 3(1-4) 
A synthesis of practical experiences, ideas and issues pertinent to more ef- 
fective teaching in urban areas. 



Department of Education 287 

630. Foundations in Reading Instruction. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education 2179) 
Basic reading course; consideration of the board field of reading — its goals 
and nature; factors affecting its growth; sequential development of skills, 
attitudes and interests, types of reading approaches, organization and ma- 
terials in teaching the fundamentals of reading. 

635. Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years. Credit 3(3-0) 
Methods, materials, and techniques used in reading instruction for pre- 
school through grade three. An examination of learning, the teaching of read- 
ing, and curriculum experiences and procedures for developing reading 
skills. 

636. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the 
Elementary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2171) 

The application of principles of learning and child development to the 
teaching of reading and the related language arts. Methods and approaches to 
the teaching of reading in the elementary school, including phonics, develop- 
mental measures, informal testing procedures, and the construction and utili- 
zation of instructional materials. 

637. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2178) 

Nature of a developmental reading program initiating and organizing a 
high school reading program, the reading curriculum, including reading in 
the content subjects, critical reading, procedures and techniques, and cor- 
rective and remedial aspects. 

638. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction. Credit 3(3-0) 
Methods, techniques, and materials used in the diagnosis of reading prob- 
lems in the kindergarten-primary area through the intermediate level. Atten- 
tion upon the pupil and the interpretation of physiological, psychological, 
sociological, and educational factors affecting learning to read. Opportunity 
for identification analysis interpretation on, and strategies for fulfilling the 
reading needs of all pupils. Prerequisite: Psychology 541. 

639. Reading Practicum. Credit 3(0 -6) 
Application of methods, materials and professional practices relevant to 

teaching pupils. Provisions for participation in and teaching of reading. 
Designed to coordinate the student's background in reading, diagnosis, 
learning, and materials. Student teaching in a public school. Prerequisite: 
12 credit hours in reading. 

640. Reading for the Atypical Learner. Credit 3(3-0) 
Attention to the gifted child, the able retarded, the slow learner, the dis- 
advantaged, and the linguistically different child. Special interest groups will 
be formed for investigation reports. 

641. Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2771) 

Psychological and sociological influences on culturally deprived learners 
and their development; emphasis on the experiential lacks of the culturally 



288 Department of Education 

deprived learner; and special teaching methods, materials and activities. A 
consideration of groups of American Indians, Negroes, Puerto Ricans, urban 
poor, rural poor, Mexican Americans, Mountain whites, and migrant workers 
who may be culturally deprived. 

660. Introduction to Exceptional Children. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2372) 

An overview of the educational needs of exceptional or "different" children 
in the regular classroom situation; emphasis placed on classroom techniques 
known to be most helpful to children having hearing losses, speech disorders, 
visual problems, emotional, social handicaps and intelligence deviation, in- 
cluding slow-learners and gifted children. An introduction to the area of spe- 
cial education. Designed for classroom teachers. 

661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2373) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and develop- 
ment of mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and 
emotionally and socially maladjusted children. 

662. Mental Deficiency. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2376) 

A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification and 
diagnosis; criteria for institutional placement and social control of mental 
deficiency. Prerequisites: Special Education 660 and 661. 



663. Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2375) 

The selection, administration, and interpretation of individual tests; inten- 
sive study of problems in testing exceptional and extremely deviate children; 
consideration to measurement and evaluation of children that are mentally, 
physically, and emotionally or socially handicapped. Emphasis upon the selec- 
tion and use of group tests of intelligence and the interpretation of their 
results. 

664. Materials Methods, and Problems in Teaching 

Mentally Retarded Children. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education 2377) 
Basic organization of programs for the education of the mentally retarded: 
classification and testing of mental defectives; curriculum development 
and principles of teaching intellectually slow children. Attention is also given 
to the provision of opportunities for observing and working with children 
who have been classified as mentally retarded. Prerequisites: Special Educa- 
tion 660, 661, and 663. 

665. Practicum in Special Education. Credit 3(0-6) 
Observation, participation, and teaching in an educational program for the 

mentally retarded. 



Department of Education 



289 



683. Curriculum in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2080) 

Curriculum experiences and program planning appropriate to nursery, kin- 
dergarten, and primary education. 

684. Methods in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2079) 

Administration, principles, practices, methods, and resources in the organi- 
zation of preschool and primary programs. An interdisciplinary and team ap- 
proach. Observation for teaching styles and strategies. 



GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of them, 
see the Graduate School Bulletin. 



700. Introduction to Graduate Study. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2294) 

701. Philosophy of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2185) 

702. Readings in Modern Philosophy of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2092) 

703. Educational Sociology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2195) 

710. Methods and Techniques of Research. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2189) 

711. Educational Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2299) 

720. Curriculum Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2085) 

721. Curriculum in the Elementary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2296) 

722. Curriculum in the Secondary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2187) 

723. Principles of Teaching. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2295) 

724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2193) 

725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2192) 



290 
726. 

727. 



Department of Education 

Workshop in Methods of Teaching Language Arts. 

(Formerly 2291) 



Credit 2(2-0) 



Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 

for Junior and Senior High School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2087) 



728. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 

in Elementary Schools. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2290) 

739. Reading in the Content Areas. Credit 3(3-0) 

740. Problems in the Improvement of Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2094) 

741. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction. Credit 3(3-0) 

742. Organization and Administration of Reading 

Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 

743. Advanced Practicum in Reading. Credit 3(0-6) 

744. Seminar and Research in Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 

710. Methods and Techniques of Research. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2189) 

711. Educational Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2299) 

720. Curriculum Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2085) 

721. Curriculum in the Elementary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2296) 

722. Curriculum in the Secondary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2187) 

723. Principles of Teaching. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2295) 

724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2193) 

725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2192) 

726. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Language Arts. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2291) 

727. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 

for Junior and Senior High School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2087) 



Department of Education 



291 



728. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 

in Elementary Schools. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2290) 

736. Workshop in Educational Media. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 2191) 

738. Educational Media Internship and Seminar. Credit 3(1-4) 

739. Reading in the Content Areas. Credit 3(3-0) 

740. Problems in the Improvement of Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2094) 

741. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction. Credit 3(3-0) 

742. Organization and Administration of Reading 

Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 

743. Advanced Practicum in Reading. Credit 3(0-6) 

744. Seminar and Research in Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 

782. Issues in Secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2287) 

783. Current Research in Elementary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2288) 

784. Current Research in Secondary Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2289) 

785. Independent Readings in Education I. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2395) 

786. Independent Readings in Education II. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2396) 

787. Independent Readings in Education III. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 2397) 

790. Seminar in Educational Problems. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 2392) 

791. Thesis Research. Credit 6(0-12) 
(Formerly 2292) 

792. Advanced Seminar and Internship in Educational 
Administration. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 2090) 



292 Department of Educational Media 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 

R. L. Wooden, Chairman 

Purposes and Nature of the Educational Media Program 

A unified program of audiovisual, printed services, instructional television, 
and resources in the individual school provides optimal services for students 
and teachers. 

The focus of the media program is on facilitating and improving the learning 
process in its new direction with emphasis on the learner, on individualization, 
inquiry, and independent learning for students. 

The media center's program, collection, and environment provide a broad 
spectrum of learning. 

The Educational Media Department offers programs leading toward certifi- 
cation as (1) associate media coordinator (undergraduate), and (2) media co- 
ordinator (primarily graduate) for public school service personnel. 

Objectives of Educational Media Program 

1. The development of a comprehensive integrated understanding of the 
role of media in relation to teaching and learning. 

2. The development of appropriate attitudes and skills in human relations. 

3. The acquisition of knowledge and the development of skills in evaluation 
and selection of media. 

4. Including study and experience that provides competence in developing 
effective utilization of media by students and teachers. 

5. The development of skills in the production of instructional materials. 

6. Basic competence related to organization and management of the media 
collection. 

7. The acquisition of knowledge and the development of skills related to the 
planning and management of the media program. 

This program is interdisciplinary and may be serviced by courses in the de- 
partments of education, psychology, English, speech and theater arts, indus- 
trial education, and business. 

The several departments of the university-wide community employ media 
courses as requirements or electives. 

1. The program in Educational Media leads to North Carolina state certifica- 
tion as associate media coordinator in a school setting. A minimum of 
nineteen semester hours in media is required with a teaching major. 

The student must complete Ed. 604, 603, 602, and he/she must elect at 
least ten semester hours from the following: Ed. 600, 601, 606, and 607. 

2. The program in Educational Media also leads to North Carolina state cer- 
tification as media coordinator in school settings, such as public elemen- 
tary, secondary, community colleges, technical institutes, junior colleges 
and senior colleges, and universities. It may also qualify one for media 
services in business, industry, government, military, and religious services. 

The student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours with a mini- 
mum of 60 percent in media. 



Department of Educational Media 293 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Course Descriptions in 
Educational Media 

350-600 Classification of Media Collections 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-611) 

Basic course in techniques of book and non-book description, their organiza- 
tion for services in libraries through decimal classification and their subject 
representation in the public catalog. Practice in laboratory. 

350-601 Reference Materials 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-612) 

The selection, evaluation, and use of basic reference materials with empha- 
sis on the selection of materials, study of contents, methods of location, and 
practical application. 

350-602 Utilization of Educational Media 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-644) 

Applies basic concept to problems in teaching and learning with school and 
adult audiences. Relates philosophical and psychological bases of communi- 
cation to teaching. Discusses the role of communications in problem-solving, 
attitude formation, and teaching. Methods of selecting and using educational 
media materials effectively in teaching. Experience in operating equipment, 
basic techniques in media preparation. Practice in planning and presenting a 



350-603 Production of Instructional Materials 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-642) 

The planning, designing, and production of opaque materials, charts, graphs, 
posters, transparencies, mounting, bulleting boards, displays, models, mock- 
up, spectrums, chalkboards, scriptwriting, and recording techniques. 

350-604 Educational Media Administration 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-624) 

Planning, organizing, coordinating, and administering educational media 
programs. Developing criteria for selection, utilization, care, and evaluation of 
the effectiveness of materials and equipment. Scientific arrangement of learn- 
ing environment, space and space relations. The planning of facilities and 
budgeting for programs and public relations activities. 

350-605 Systems Approach and Curricular Integration of 

Educational Media 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-645) 

350-606 Book Selection and Related Materials for Children 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-607) 

A study of children's literature with emphasis on aids and criteria for selec- 
tion of books and other materials for pre-school through late childhood ages 
story-telling, and an investigation of reading interests. 

350-607 Book Selection and Related Materials for 

Young People 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-608) 



294 Department of Educational Media 

350-608 Programming for Instructional Radio and Television 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the historical background 
of radio and television, principles and skills in utilizing the theory, language, 
signs and symbols of radio and television. Emphasis will be focused on co- 
operative team teaching approach, experimentation, and innovation as strate- 
gies for programming instruction. 

350-609 Production for Instructional Radio and Television 3(1-4) 

This course will afford opportunities for the student to develop and utilize 
knowledge and skills in designing settings, lighting techniques, operation of 
controls, directing, camera operation and care, producing and caring for vis- 
uals, video-tapes, audio-tapes, duplication of tapes, rear screen projections and 
sound effects, background music, also producing multi-media mix programs 
for various situations such as: slide-tape, or multi-image programs through film, 
slide, and opaque chain. Special provisions for training in preventive mainte- 
nance and minor repairs of equipment will be provided. 

350-610 Broadcasting for Instructional Radio and Television 3(3-0) 

This course involves presenting and evaluating live broadcast programs for 
instruction within the framework of acceptable criteria supported by the pro- 
fession. Presenting and evaluating the effectiveness of video-taped or video- 
disc recorded programs as used for instructional situations. To develop guide- 
lines for quality radio and television programs. 

Graduate Courses in Educational Media 

350-700 Programmed Instruction 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-734) 

Theory, principles, application, and evaluation of programmed instruction 
techniques, survey of programmed techniques; the selection, utilization, and 
evaluation of existing programs, surveys of commercial programs, sources and 
types of teaching machines. Practice in writing programmed instruction units. 

350-701 Media Retrieval Systems 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 310-735) 

A survey of various media classification, storage and retrieval models as ap- 
plied to information centers and their operation. Compares traditional models 
with the logic of manual, mechanical, and electronic retrieval systems. Writing 
models for independent study. 

350-702 Workshop in Educational Media 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 310-736) 

An exploration of recent materials, methods, and techniques and the develop- 
ment of skills and competencies in audiovisual communications. Demonstra- 
tions and presentations by specialists, audiovisual representatives. 

350-703 Educational Media Internship and Seminar 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 310-703) 

This is a professional laboratory designed to provide the student with on-the- 
job training and direct experiences relating to his "needs" and interests in in- 



Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 295 

terpreting, organizing, and administering a well-rounded Educational Media 
program. This course will afford students with the opportunity and experience 
to work in a relevant and practical situation that will deepen his understanding, 
broaden his perspective, gain keener insights, and increase his skills and abil- 
ities to organize instructional materials, equipment and work with people. 

During a period of at least six weeks, it is desired that the student will have 
specific duties and responsibilities for observing, studying, and working in the 
audiovisual media program pertaining to (1) architectural features, (2) pro- 
gram development, (3) cataloging, filing, and record keeping, (4) organizational 
pattern, (5) personnel selection and staffing, (6) administration, care, mainte- 
nance, and storage of supplies, instructional materials, and equipment, (8) 
public relations, budgeting considerations, (9) in-service education, (10) pro- 
gram evaluation, (11) research and other concomitants, such as attending and 
conducting professional meetings and leadership conferences and seminars. 

The coordinator of the Educational Media Internship Program in consultation 
with the student will arrange for his suitable placement under the guidance 
and supervision of an official of the placement facility whether it be a public 
school system, industry, business, governmental agency, religious organization 
or otherwise. During his internship, the University coordinator will visit, ob- 
serve and confer with the student and his immediate supervisor. This will help 
to insure that the student's growth and development are being given primary 
concern, and to serve as feedback for assessing and evaluating his program of 
study at the University. The student will be required to present a written proj- 
ect describing his internship training and experiences. 

350-715 Advanced Production in Instructional Radio 

and Television 3(0-6) 

An in-depth study of advanced methods and techniques necessary to pro- 
duce quality instructional radio and television programs. Experimentation, 
innovations, and research will be encouraged and high production standards 
in keeping with those of Commercial Stations. Student-produced programs 
may be broadcast on a cooperative basis over local radio and television facilities. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND GUIDANCE 

William Lawrence, Acting Chairman 



The Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance offers a program 
leading to a Master of Science in Education with a concentration in Counselor 
Education (Guidance). In addition to the degree program, the Department 
offers courses designed for educators who wish to raise the level of their 
preparation or to develop competencies necessary to enter certain service 
positions in the field of education. The master's level program in counselor 
education is designed to prepare graduates for employment as professional 
counselors in both educational and non-educational settings. 



296 Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 

Requirements for admission to candidacy and for the degree are listed 
earlier in this catalogue in the description of the degree programs. 



COUNSELOR EDUCATOR CURRICULUM: 31 S.H. required 

This program is designed for the individual who seeks issuance of a School 
Counselor's Certificate or the Master's Degree. The prerequisites for admis- 
sion to the program are (1) a course in principles of guidance or an equivalent 
course (e.g., Introduction to Guidance, Field of Guidance, and so on), and (2) 
a course in statistics or educational and psychological measurement. 

1. Required Courses: 

Sem. Hrs 

Education 701 Philosophy of Education 3 

Education 720 Curriculum Development 3 

or 

Education 722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 3 

Ed. Psy. 726 Educational Psychology 3 

Ed. Psy. 623 Personality Development 3 

Guidance 706 Organizational and Administration of 

Guidance Services 2 

Guidance 716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 2 

Guidance 717 Educational and Occupational Information 3 

Guidance 718 Introduction to Counseling 3 

Guidance 730 Guidance Practicum 3 

Courses distributed among — 
Anthropology 
Economics 

Intercultural Relations 
Sociology 

2. An Internship involving an extended period of continuous full-time experi- 
ence must be completed by students who have not had previous teaching 
experience. The Internship will be completed during a regular school 
term, and will be concerned with providing knowledge about the total 
school program including curriculum and relationships with students, 
parents, teachers, administrators and community referral agencies. 

3. Other Requirements: 

Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude and Advanced Test in Education) 

3.0 grade point average or better for graduate courses. 

Final Comprehensive Examination in Guidance and in Education. 



Undergraduate Courses in Educational Psychology and Guidance 
320-435 Educational Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of basic problems underlying the psychology of education, in- 
dividual differences, development of personality, motivation of learning and 
development, nature of learning and procedures which best promotes its 
efficiency. 



Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 297 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses in Educational 
Psychology and Guidance 

320-600 Introduction to Guidance Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the meaning of guidance; need for guidance, guidance tech- 
niques; and role of the teacher, administrator, employer and counselor in the 
guidance program; the concept of the term approach to guidance and ways 
of evaluating guidance services. This course is prerequisite for all other 
courses in guidance and must, therefore, be taken first. 

320-623 Personality Development Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the basic processes in personality, the contents of personality and 
the consequences of personality. Concern will be given to the structure and 
development of the normal personality, influences of childhood experiences 
upon personality, significance of emotional, developmental, integration, 
measurements of traits, and personality types. 

320-661 Psychology of the Exceptional Child Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and development 
of mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, exceptionally 
high IQ children and emotionally and socially maladjusted children. In addi- 
tion, the course will include a study of the basic facts, principles and methods 
of understanding the personality and behavior of individuals who possess 
mental or physical handicaps. 

320-662 Mental Deficiency Credit 3(3-0) 

An in-depth study of types and characteristics of mental deficiencies, classi- 
fication and diagnoses, criteria for institutional placement and social control 
of mental deficient children. Attention is given also to the nature of mental 
retardation, biological and psychological factors, heredity-environmental in- 
teractions, cultural-family factors, and review of related research. 



Courses Offered to Graduates Only 

320-706 Organization and Administration of Credit 2(2-0) 

Guidance Services 

A study of organizational procedures and patterns; methods by which gui- 
dance policies and service may be emplemented; and the administrative rela- 
tionships of person's involved in the organizational structure. Further atten- 
tion will be given to conceptual models useful to the counselor in under- 
standing how organizational structures emerge, develop and decline, organi- 
zational goals, theories of organization, authority-subordinate roles; and 
communication within and between organizations. 

320-707 Research Seminar Credit 3(1-4) 

An in-depth understanding of principles of planning, conducting, analyzing 

and interpreting counseling research and evaluation. Evaluating research in 



298 Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance 

professional journals. Formulating a research problem, conducting a research 
study and writing the research report. (Permission must be granted by Coun- 
selor-Educator) 

320-714 Internship in Guidance Credit 3(1-4) 

The internship is designed to give the counselor-trainee who has not had 
teaching and other related educational experiences, the opportunity to be in- 
volved in the organization and operation of the many and varied public school 
programs and their interaction with community agencies. (Permission must 
be granted by Counselor-Educator) 

320-715 Measurement for Guidance Credit 3(2-2) 

A critical study of the principles and techniques involved in measurement 
in Guidance and Education. Emphasis will be placed on concepts in the quali- 
fication of human performances, the nature of tests, especially the charac- 
teristics of objectivity, validity, reliability, and standardization. 

320-716 Techniques of Individual Analysi Credit 2(1-2) 

A course designed to allow students an opportunity to demonstrate diagnos- 
tic and analytical skills necessary for psychological counseling. Emphasis will 
be placed on principles of interviewing, observation, interpretation of assess- 
ment data, development of listening and testing conditions and procedures. 

320-717 Educational and Occupational Information Credit 3(3-0) 

Study of vocational development theory, occupational trends, sources of 
educational and occupational information and their application to guidance 
and counseling. 



320-718 Introduction to Counseling Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles and application of counseling with particular emphasis on the 
counseling relationship, the counseling techniques and the different theoreti- 
cal approaches to counseling. 

320-720 Principles and Practices of Group Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Provides a general overview of the dynamics, processes and practices of 
group work in guidance activities and in counseling, with special emphasis 
on the therapeutic forces for behavior change within a counseling group. En- 
rollees participate in a group to exchange their own interactions and motives 
and the experiences are related to the didactic content of the course. 

320-726 Educational Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

An advanced indepth study of the application of psychological principles 
to educational practices. 

320-727 Child Growth and Development Credit 3(3-0) 

A comprehensive analysis of physical, mental, emotional, and social growth 
and development from birth through adolescence. 



Department of Adult Education and Community Services 299 

320-728 Measurement and Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

Strong consideration is given to applying measurement techniques and 
interpretation of group tests and individual pupil diagnostic tests. 

320-729 Mental Hygiene for Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the functions of mental hygiene in the total educative 
process. Attention is given to the basic principles of mental health as these 
apply to pupils and teachers alike; to the types of adjustment; to the develop- 
ment of personality; and to psychotherapeutic techniques for the restoration 
of mental health. 



DEPARTMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

B. W. Harris, Chairman 

The role and scope of the university's Department of Adult Education and 
Community Services may be conceptualized and understood through various 
factors, as described below: 

Philosophy: Extension or public service is one of the three major functions of 
a Land-Grand institution of higher learning. The extension function is 
grounded upon the belief that the general populace, from which the univer- 
sity receives considerable support, is entitled to educational service. (It has 
been proven that an individual may be capable of gaining new knowledge 
throughout his life span.) These beliefs constitute the philosophical position 
of this department. 

Objective: The fundamental objective of the department is to promote the 
extension function of the university, for the purpose of meeting the needs of 
people being served. More specifically, the department seeks to provide a 
wide variety of learning experiences for the benefit of non-resident students. 

Clientele: Courses are scheduled to meet the expressed needs of learners as 
classified below: 

A. Employees and management personnel in private industry. 

B. Employees and administrative personnel in public or governmental agen- 
cies. 

C. Personnel who may be associated with such voluntary organizations and 
agencies as Agricultural Extension, Vocational Agriculture, YWCA 
YMCA, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, churches, and social organizations. 

D. Teachers and other professional personnel which may need in-service 
training. 

E. Housewives, senior citizens, and retired personnel who may need speci- 
fied learning experience for purposes of gaining further personal fulfill- 
ment. 

That the above designated groups of clients can be reached and served mean- 
ingful, is consistent with the principle that learning can be lifelong. 



300 Department of Adult Education and Community Services 

Program: The philosophy and objective of the Department of Adult Educa- 
tion and Community Services suggest not a single program, but one which is 
comprehensive and multidimensional. Therefore, the following components 
comprise the total program: 

A. Formal Activities — 

These endeavors include the program of evening and weekend courses 
for which academic credit is attainable. It is, therefore, possible for stu- 
dents to complete requirements for the baccalaureate degree on a part- 
time basis. Also, the opportunity is available for elementary and secon- 
dary school teachers to meet requirements for certificate renewal and/or 
begin graduate studies leading toward the master's degree. 

B. Informal Activities — 

Short-term learning experiences are made available through a variety of 
non-credit classes, conferences, workshops, seminars, and clinics, which 
address themselves to specific problems. Of equal importance is the com- 
munity services component which offers speakers and consultant services. 

C. Special Projects — 

Through funds, which are usually available from sources other than state 
appropriations, it is possible to provide added programs and services. 
Currently, these sources include the Title I Act of 1965, National Endow- 
ment for the Humanities, and Law Enforcement Assistance Administra- 
tion. 

D. Staff— 

The affairs of the department are administered by the chairman, pro- 
fessional staff members and clerical personnel. A large number of pro- 
grams and activities are conducted in cooperation with other academic 
departments. This makes it possible for the university's resources to be 
extended more fully. 

E. Facilities- 
Departmental offices are housed in the North Carolina A&T State Uni- 
versity Center for Continuing Education (Located on east campus at U.S. 
Highway #29, North.) The Center has a modernized classroom and a con- 
ference room. In addition, there are fifteen (15) bedrooms available for 
over-night guests, who may wish to attend evening, weekend classes, or 
conferences. 

F. For further information — 
Respondents are asked to write: 

DEPARTMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

N. C. A&T State University 

Box G-25 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 



or call 



(919) 379-7840 or 379-7841 



Department of Adult Education and Community Services 301 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ADULT EDUCATION 

The Department of Adult Education and Community Services offers an inter- 
disciplinary program of study leading to the degree of Master of Science in 
Adult Education. Completion of a minimum of thirty (30) semester hours of 
study is required for learners who select the thesis option; thirty-three (33) se- 
mester hours are required for those persons who select the non-thesis option. 
Under the guidance of an advisor, and individual's program of study should be 
prepared to include at least eighteen (18) semester hours in Adult Education; 
the remaining courses may be studied in other departments. (See the full de- 
gree program for recommended courses.) Students are advised to consult with 
their advisor before selecting one of the two options of graduate study. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

650. Adult Edu. Special Projects in Adult Edu. Credits: 1-4 

651. Adult Edu. Introduction to Adult Education Credit: 3(3-0) 

652. Adult Edu. Methods in Adult Education Credit: 3(3-0) 

653. Adult Edu. Adult Development and Learning Credit: 3(3-0) 

654. Adult Edu. Gerontology Credit: 3(3-0) 

Courses Restricted to Graduate Students Only 

700. Adult Edu. History and Philosophy of Adult/ 

Continuing Education Credit: 3(3-0) 

701. Adult Edu. Organization, Administration, and Supervision 

of Adult/Continuing Education Programs Credit: 3(3-0) 

702. Adult Edu. Practicum in Teaching Adults Credit: 3(1-4) 

703. Adult Edu. Seminar on Contemporary Issues in 

Adult/ Continuing Education Credit: 3(3-0) 

704. Adult Edu. Independent Study Credit: 2(2-0) 

705. Adult Edu. Thesis Research in Adult Edu. Credits to be arranged 
G. Course Description — 

650. Adult Education. Special Problems in Adult Education 

Special topics, individual and group study projects, research, workshops, 
seminars, summer institutes, travel study tours and organized visitations in 
areas of adult education worked out and agreed upon by participating students 
and the department of Adult Education and Community Services. 

CREDIT: 1-4 

651. Adult Education. Introduction to Adult Education 

The purpose is to develop a view of Adult Education as a broad, diverse, and 
complex field of study, research and professional practice. Students will sur- 



302 Department of Adult Education and Community Services 

vey many institutions, firms, programs, and individual activities for insights 
into the scope of Adult Education, its client groups, their reasons for becoming 
adult learners, and the range of methods and materials used to enable adults to 
learn. CREDIT: 3(3-0) 

652. Adult Education. Methods in Adult Education 

(Formerly Adult Education 671) 

Methods of informal instruction, group leadership, conference planning and 
techniques in handling various illues of interest to adults. For persons prepar- 
ing to conduct adult education programs as well as those preparing to serve as 
instructors or leaders in the public schools and/or in various agencies serving 
adults. CREDIT: 3(3-0) 

653. Adult Education. Adult Development and Learning 

The focus is on adult development psychology and learning theory. Adult 
development and learning is grounded in human developmental psychology, 
and enables students to investigate the life. From the research literature of 
adult life stages, students will be asked to read works of Freud, Havinghurst, 
Erikson, Gould, Levinson, Vaillant, and Klemme. CREDIT: 3(3-0) 

654. Adult Education. Gerontology 

The basic purpose of this course is to study the process of aging. Attention 
will be given to the influence of cultural, sociological, and economic factors. 
An important phase of the course will deal with planning for retirement. 

CREDIT: 3(3-0) 



Courses Restricted to Graduate Students Only 

700. Adult Education. History and Philosophy of Adult 
Continuing Education 

A study of historical and philosophical foundations and thought which have 
influenced how adult needs have been met through learning. Consideration 
will be given to the thinking upon which teaching and learning were based dur- 
ing ancient times through the present time. CREDIT: 3(3-0) 

701. Adult Education. Organization, Administration, and Supervision 
of Adult/Continuing Education Programs 

An examination of theories, concepts, and practices as related to the func- 
tions, planning, organizing, staffing, financing, motivating, decision-making, 
evaluating, and delegating in an Adult Education organization. 

CREDIT: 3(3-0) 

702. Adult Education, Practicum in Teaching Adults 

(Prerequisites: Adult Edu. 651, 653, and 700) 

Practical experience in involving a group of adults in a teaching-learning ex- 
perience. Under supervision, the practice teacher will have an opportunity to 
apply concepts, teaching methods, and instructional materials in a real life sit- 
uation. CREDIT: 3(1-4) 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 303 

703. Adult Education. Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/ 
Continuing Education 

This course is integrative in nature, thereby offering the student an oppor- 
tunity to synthesize concepts, theories, and methods of teaching learned in 
earlier courses. Students will be encouraged to further explore areas of special 
interest. CREDIT: 1(1-0) 

704. Adult Education. Independent Study 

This course permits a student to undertake an analysis of a problem, through 
individual study outside the traditional classroom setting. The problem may be 
selected from either travel, hobby, or a job-related experience. 
(Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor) CREDIT: 2(2-0) 

705. Adult Education. Thesis Research in Adult Education 

CREDIT: To be arranged 



[DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND RECREATION 

Roy D. Moore, Chairman 

The objectives of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion are: 

1. To provide instruction in a wide variety of physical education activities 
to meet the needs and interests of all students in the required general 
education program of the University. 

2. To promote participation in wholesome extra-class activities through 
sponsoring and supervising such organizations as the Aquatics Club, 
Cheerleaders' Squad, Dance Group, Gymnastics Club, Women's Ath- 
letic Association, Intramural Leagues, and Officiating Club. 

3. To provide recreational outlets for students and members of the College 
community through conduct of informal recreational activities. 

4. To enrich the total University program through cooperation with the 
programs of such units of the University as the music and dramatic 
groups, alumni association, agricultural homemaking groups, guidance 
and health service divisions. 

5. To provide necessary preparation for students planning careers as 
teachers of elementary, junior and senior high school health and physical 
education and as athletic coaches and recreational administrators. 

6. To provide courses in health, physical education which meet State and 
National Teacher Certification standards. 

7. To provide courses in Recreation which meet guidelines of National 
Recreation and Park Administration. 



304 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 



Each major is required to complete a minimum total of fourteen com- 
petencies of the following: 

3 — Team Sports 

3 — Individual and Dual Sports 

2 — Gymnastics 

2 — Dance 

4 — Swimming 

Each major is also required to specialize in one of the following areas: 
Team Sports, Individual and Dual Sports (includes officiating), Gymnastics, 
Dance, Swimming or Athletic Training. 

During the Junior and Senior years before student teaching, the major will 
be assigned to an instructor and assist in the basic program. Freshmen 
Physical Education majors will be placed in PE 101 and PE 102. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
FOR MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education 101, 102, 103, 

and 104 1 

English 102 (1 hour either semester) .... — 
Education 100 (1 hour either 

semester) 1 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

3 

3 

3 



16+ 



16+ 



Sophomore Year 



Course and Number 

Education 300, 301 

English 250 

Humanities 200, 201 

Foreign Language 

Psychology 320 

Zoology 160 

Health Education 200, 220 

Physical Education 229, 231 

Physical Education 234 (W), 

235 (W) 

Physical Education 237 (M), 

238 (M) 

Physical Education 246 (W), 

247 (w) 

Physical Education 249 (M), 

251 (M) 

Physical Education 261, 361 

Air or Military Science (Optional) 



Fall Semester 
Credit 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

2 



2 
21 



2 
20 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 



305 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 3 

Psychology 436 — 

Zoology 469, 560 3 

Health Education 440 2 

Physical Education 445 — 

Physical Education 446 3 

Health Education 442 — 

Physical Education 448, 450 1 

Physical Education 451, 452 1 

Physical Education 453 (W), 455 (W) . . . . 2 

Physical Education 456 (M), 458 2 

Physical Education 460, 461 (M) 2 

Physical Education 462 _2_ 

21 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 



19 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Health Education 560 2 

Education 500 — 

Physical Education 563 2 

Education 560 — 

Physical Education 566 3 

Physical Education 567, 568 1 

Physical Education 569 2 

Physical Education 669 3 

Education 533 _^_ 

13 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



_2_ 

12 



Suggested Program for Recreation Majors 
Freshman Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

English 100 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

History 100 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Phy. Ed. 101 or 102 1 

English 102 3 

Education 100 1 

Air or Military Sci. 

(Optional) _1 

19 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

English 101 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

History 101 3 

Physical Science 101 4 

Physical Education 261 1 

Health Education 200 2 

Air or Military Sci. 

(Optional) 1 



17 



306 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Humanities 200 3 

Physical Education 460 2 

English 250 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Economics 301 3 

Physical Education 261 1 

Physical Education 231 1 

Physical Education 247 2 

Air or Military Sci. 

(Optional) ._1 

18 



2nd Semester 
S.H. 

Humanities 201 3 

S100 3 

Health Education 442 3 

Physical Education 229 1 

Health Education 220 2 

Art 401 3 

Air or Military Sci. 

(Optional) 1 



16 



Junior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Recreation 402 2 

Industrial Arts 210 2 

Political Science 442 

or Poli. Sci. 330 3 

Recreation 464 2 

Music 119 2 

Physical Education 448 1 

Recreation 561 3 

Psychology 323 ._3 

18 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 

Recreation 408 2 

Recreation 463 3 

Recreation 465 3 

Recreation 466 3 

Physical Education 344 1 

Physical Education 458 2 



14 



Recreation 112 — Summer Field Work I — 6 S.H. 



Senior Year 



1st Semester 

S.H. 

Recreation 509 2 

Education 644 2 

Physical Education 566 3 

Recreation 570 3 

B.A. 305 3 

Elective 1 

14 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 

Recreation 510 2 

Sociology 204 3 

B.A. 351 3 

Electives 4 



12 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 307 

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

Undergraduate 

200. Personal Hygiene. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2700) 

This course is designed to give the student definite knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of personal health, both mental and physical, and to prepare him for self 
guidance through and beyond the college years. Emphasis is placed upon in- 
formation pertinent to social behavior today and upon effective approaches to 
college living. 

220. Community Health. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2720) 

An introductory study of environmental factors which affect health. Empha- 
sis will be placed upon the health of the group rather than that of the individual. 
Consumer health, community resources for health and prevention and control 
of disease through organized community efforts will be stressed. (Prerequisite 
200.) 

440. Advanced Hygiene and Principles of Health Education Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2740) 

A comprehensive review of health facts and scientific principles applicable 
to the prospective teacher, the school child, and the community. Fundamentals 
of health promotion in the school program are considered. (Prerequisite: HE 
200; 201.) 

442. First Aid, Safety, and Prevention of Injuries. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2745) 

Techniques of first aid to the injured in the home, school and community and 
the teaching of safety measures to be practiced in daily living; the prevention 
and care of the injuries occurring in physical education classes and in competi- 
tive sports. The standard Red Cross First Aid Certificate is awarded upon suc- 
cessful completion of the course. (Prerequisite: Zoo. 469) 

560. The Teaching of Health Education Credit 2(2-1) 

(Formerly 2760) 

Methods, materials and procedures for the teaching of health in the ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. Field experience will include: observations, 
service as aides and assistants. (Prerequisite: Health Education 220 and 442; 
Zoology 469, 560; and HE 440.) 

651. Personal, School and Community Health Problems Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2771) 

A study of personal, school and community health problems and resources. 
Emphasis is placed on the control of communicable diseases, healthful school 
living and the development of individuals of the scientific attitude and a posi- 
tive philosophy of health living. Field experience will include: observations, ser- 
vice as aides and assistants. 



308 Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

652. Methods and Materials in Health Education for 

Elementary and Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2772) 

A study of the fundamentals of the school health program, pupil needs, 
methods, planning instruction, teaching techniques, selection and evaluation 
of materials for the elementary and secondary programs, and the use of the 
community resources. 



GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT 

101. Fundamentals of Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2701) 

To develop an understanding of the value and the logic behind exercise and 
sports activity and regular habits of exercise, to determine the physical fitness 
needs of the student with the nature, basic rules, techniques and skills of a 
wide variety of popular American sports and guide him into activities which 
will be of most interest and benefit to him now and in the future. 

102. A Continuation of 101. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2703) 

229. Modern Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2729) 
To develop an understanding of the various qualities of movement; the tech- 
niques of obtaining and applying them in the art form of dance. 

231. Folk and Tap Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2731) 
Clog, tap and folk dances characteristic of many nationalities. 

233. Social and Country Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2733) 

Ballroom, square, and round dance forms; fundamentals leading and fol- 
lowing, dance etiquette. 

234. Team Sports: Hockey, Soccer, Basketball (Women). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2724) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology, and cultural signific- 
ance of field hockey, soccer and basketball. 

235. Team Sports: Volleyball, Speedball, Softball, (W). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2725) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology and cultural signific- 
ance of volleyball, speedball, and softball. 

237. Group Games, Football and Basketball. Credit 1(0-3) 

(Formerly 2737) 
Practice methods and applied techniques of a large variety of games of 
lower organization of the circle, group, and line types which might be suitable 
for playground, gymnasium, camp and for adult gatherings. Concentration on 
developing performance skills and understanding of football and basketball. 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 309 

238. Baseball, Track and Field. Credit 1(0-3) 

(Formerly 2738) 
To develop performance skills, methods, and techniques in baseball, track 
and field. 

240. Introduction to Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2740) 
Survey of the nature and scope of physical education; interpretation of ob- 
jectives and philosophy of physical education as a part of the total educational 
program. Qualifications, responsibilities, and opportunities of professional 
personnel. Evaluation of personal fitness and suitability to area of interest. 

246. Individual Sports: Archery, Tennis, Badminton, Golf, Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2726) 

Fall or Spring. Techniques, rules, playing courtesies, and significance of 
individual sports to college and after school life. 

247. Individual Sports: Recreational Games. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2727) 

Shuffleboard, handball, deck tennis, table tennis, croquet, modified bowl- 
ing and horseshoe. 

248. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2736) 

A continuation of 454. 

249. Individual Sports and Combatives. Credit 1(0-3) 
(Formerly 2739) 

To develop performance skills in combatives and a wide variety of individual 
sports including shuffleboard, handball, table tennis, badminton, croquet, 
archery, golf, and tennis. 

251. Shoftball, Soccer, and Volleyball (Men). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2721) 

To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
softball, soccer, and volleyball. 

252. Touch Football, Speedball, and Basketball (Men). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2722) 

To develop an understanding of rules, strategy, and performance skills in 
touch football, speedball, and volleyball. 

261. Swimming, Beginning. Fall or Spring. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2711) 
To teach the elementary skills as outlined in the American Red Cross Stan- 
dards for beginning swimmers. 

263. Rhythmics. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2732) 
Suitable types of rhythmical activities for boys and men including funda- 
mental movements, folk, tap, social dance and singing games. 



310 Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

335: Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 

Special activities designed for those students whose physical examination 
shows that they are unable to participate in the regular physical education 
classes. 

343. Bowling. Credit 1(0-2) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in bowling. 

344. Beginning Tennis and Badminton. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2744) 

To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
tennis and badminton. 

361. Intermediate Swimming. Credit 1(0-2) 

Swimming for Intermediates. 

441. Beginning Golf. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2741) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in golf. 

443. Skating for Beginners. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2742) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in ice skating. 

445. Kinesiology. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2752) 

A study of the body movements, types of muscles exercise and their rela- 
tion to the problems of body development. (Prerequisite: Zoology 469.) 

446. History and Principles of Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2749) 

The evolution of physical education from the earliest time to the present 
day. Consideration of the relationship of physical education to education and 
to national life and ideas through the different historical periods. A critical 
analysis of the scientific basis for physical education with applications of the 
aims and objectives to the modern concepts of education. 

448. Gymnastics I. (Men and Women). Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2747) 
An introduction to the basic skills of tumbling, floor exercise, trampoline 
and different types of vaulting. The course will include methods and basic 
evaluation. 

450. Advanced Gymnastics (M) (W). Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2734) 
Men: Fundamental skills and routines on the following gymnastics appara- 
tus: rings, parallel bars, horizontal bar, and side horse. 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 311 

451. Dance Composition. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2753) 

The rhythmical and musical basis of dance, the elements of dance construc- 
tion. Theory and practice of skills involved. (Prerequisite 229.) 

452. Applied Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2755) 

A coordinated course designed to increase skills in technique and the use of 
related art materials. (Prerequisites: 229, 231, 451.) 

453. Techniques and Methods in Fall and Indoor Activities. Credit 2(1-4) 
(Formerly 2754) 

Theory and practice of field hockey, soccer, archery, golf, basketball, gym- 
nastics, and apparatus. Analysis of performance skills, materials and techniques. 
Opportunity for officiating and obtaining local and national official rating. 

454. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2735) 

A continuation of 262. 

455. Techniques and Methods of Seasonal and 

Indoor Activities. Credit 2(1-4) 

(Formerly 2756) 
Theory and practice of volleyball, recreational games, speedball, Softball, 
tennis, badminton, track, and field, Materials and teaching techniques, analysis 
of skills involved. Opportunity for obtaining officials' ratings. 

456. Teaching of Soccer, Football and Basketball. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2745) 

Consideration is given to the teaching of history, rules, performance skills, 
methods of organizing practices, strategy, team offenses and defenses, and 
various formations for the three sports. Field experience will include: observa- 
tions, service as aides and assistants. 

460. Community Recreation. Credit 2(2-0) 
. (Formerly 2761) 

A study of city, state, and national organization. Practice in the general prin- 
ciples and techniques in the organization and promotion of leisure activities 
for home, school, and community. Field experience will include: observations, 
service as aides and assistants. 

461. The Teaching of Individual Sports and Net Games. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2748) 

Methods and techniques for teaching individual sports including shuffle- 
board, handball, table tennis, badminton, archery, deck tennis, volleyball, 
newcomb, and paddle tennis. Field experience will include: observations, ser- 
vice as aides and assistants. 

462. Elementary School Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
Philosophy, program planning, and method for teaching children. Observa- 
tion and instruction of children at various grade levels. Experiences in simple 



312 Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

games, relays, stunts, tumbling, creative rhythms and dance movement ex- 
ploration. (Prerequisite: 240 — Admittance to the Teacher Education Pro- 
gram.) 

469. The Physiology of Exercise. Credit 3(2-2) 

The purpose of this course is to observe and record the effects of physical 
activity on the organic systems and service organs of the human body and to 
learn basic laboratory techniques and procedures of physical education. 

547. Baseball Stunts. Credit 1(0-2) 

560. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health 

and Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2760) 
Same as Education 501. 

562. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2762) 

Same as Education 533. 

563. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2763) 

Methods of examining and determining needs of the handicapped; activities 
suitable for individuals with abnormal body conditions, and the conduct of a 
program of restricted activities to meet their needs. Field experience will in- 
clude: observations, service as aides and assistants. 

565. Problems in Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2765) 

Special administrative problems in the organization of physical education 
programs and the coordination of the different phases pertinent to men and 
women of professional construction in the light of historical backgrounds, in- 
tramural activities, girls' athletics, athletic insurance, and athletic associations. 

566. The Organization and Administration of 

Health and Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2766) 

Philosophy and policies in the administration of a health and physical educa- 
tion program, including health services, healthful school living, health instruc- 
tion, the classification of students, the staff, teaching loads, time schedule, 
finance, the gymnasium, locker-rooms, equipment, intramural and inter-scho- 
lastic athletics. Field experience will include: observations, service as aides and 
assistants. (Prerequisites: 446 and permission of advisor.) Observation and 
evaluation of programs are required. 

567. Advanced Techniques and Methods in Physical 

Education Activities. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2767) 
A course designed to increase skill in technique and the use of related ma- 
terials in the areas of dance, sports, gymnastics, aquatics, fundamentals of 
marching and conditioning activities. Emphasis is placed upon the develop- 
ment of competency in areas of individual student weakness. 



Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 313 

568. Physical Education Specialization. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2768) 

A continuation of 471. Opportunities for careful exploration in dance, 
aquatics, sports, gymnastics through skill improvement, independent study, 
field experience and special projects pertinent to the particular area of inter- 
est. 

569. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health and 

Physical Education. Credit 3(2-2) 

The use of various research methods as applied to health education and the 
study of methods of evaluating biological, social and physiological out- 
comes for health education and physical education. Elementary statistical 
procedures are utilized. Prerequisite: Psychology 436. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

655. Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2775) 

A practical course for experienced teachers. Consideration given to in- 
dividual problems in physical education with analysis of present trends. 

656. Administration of Interscholastic and Intramural 

Athletics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2776) 
A study of the relation of athletics to education, and the problems of fi- 
nance, facilities, scheduling eligibility, and insurance. Consideration given to 
the organization and administration of intramural activities in the school pro- 
gram. 

657. Community Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2777) 

A study of the recreational facilities and problems with consideration being 
given to the promotion of effective recreational programs in rural and urban 
communities. 

658. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2778) 

Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis placed on sea- 
sonal activity. 

669. The Physiology of Exercise. Credit 3(2-2) 

The purpose of this course is to observe and record the effects of physical 
activity on the organic systems and service organs of the human body and to 
learn basic laboratory techniques and procedures of physical education. 



314 Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Recreation Courses 

112. Summer Field Experience. Credit 6(0-6) 

(Formerly 2712) 
A placement program conducted in cooperation with a formal recreation 
agency. The student is assigned to an agency during the summer. The student 
is required to maintain records of daily experiences relative to organization, 
programs, problems, supervision, conferences and budget. 

402. Field Experience I. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2702) 
Laboratory experiences during the semester in an operating recreational 
program. 

408. Field Experience II. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2708) 
Practices in a second agency of Field Experience. 

463. Principles and Practices of Outdoor Recreation. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2763) 

Philosophy, organization, administration and laboratory experiences in 
outdoor recreation. 

464. Group Leadership. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2750) 

Techniques in group dynamics and methods of developing group leader- 
ship capabilities. 

465. Program Planning in Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2765) 

This course is an analysis of recreation programs. Emphasis is placed on 
objectives, personnel and facilities. 

466. Camp Administration. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2766) 

The organization and administration of camp activities. Programming 
camping activities that will apply to all ages and both sexes. 

509. Field Experience III. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2709) 

Practices in a third agency of Field Experience. 

510. Field Experience IV. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2710) 

Practices in a fourth agency of Field Experience. 

561. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Recreation. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2760) 
The application of methods of research and evaluation to the various prob- 
lems in recreation. 

570. Supervision of Recreation and Park Services. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 564) 
An analysis and investigation of supervision of employees involved in 
recreational services. 



DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
AND TECHNOLOGY 




DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION AND 
TECHNOLOGY 

Charles W. Pinckney, Director 

In responding to increasing interest and requests for the type of academic 
service embodied in the technology of modern industry the Division of Indus- 
trial Education and Technology identifies its primary function. The Division ad- 
ministers training programs leading to careers in teaching industrial subjects, 
safety and driver education and related technological-middle management 
positions for industry, commerce and governmental agencies. These programs 
provide collegiate-level preparation for a family of careers that require a 
common background of knowledge and understanding of modern industrial- 
production operations and management. 

The breadth and depth of offerings by the Division accommodate maxi- 
mum flexibility in choice of career preparation permitting development of 
the technical background necessary to many contemporary and emerging pro- 
fessional employment opportunities. 

The Division is organized into three departments, namely industrial educa- 
tion, industrial technology, and Safety and Driver Education. These depart- 
ments provide teacher training and preparation for industrial-technical-man- 
agement careers. 

Admission to the Division 

The admission of students to programs offered by the Division is based upon 
general admission requirements of the University for collegiate-level work. 
Transfer students from other approved institutions, including junior colleges, 
may be admitted with advanced standing after having such credits earned 
elsewhere evaluated by the Admissions Office. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

George C. Gail, Chairman 

This department offers three major undergraduate curricula for the pre- 
paration of teachers of industrial arts, vocational industrial education and 
safety and driver education. It also offers graduate curricula in these fields 
leading to the Master of Science degree. Service curricular leading to teacher 
certification is provided to interested students. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

Industrial arts teachers generally work with public school and college stu- 
dents helping them gain a fuller understanding of various areas of industry; its 
materials, production methods, resulting products, and personnel. 

Teaching careers in industrial arts are open to competent young men and 
women possessing creativeness, ingenuity and inventiveness; and who en- 
joy working with youth and adults. The curriculum encompasses a study of 
many technological areas such as manufacturing, construction, communi- 
cations and transportation. More specifically; opportunities are provided for 
gaining experience in drafting and design, woodworking, electricity-elec- 
tronics, metalworking, leathercraft, plastics, printing, photography and ceram- 
ics. In addition to acquiring knowledge of teaching techniques, industrial or- 
ganizations and occupations; students are actively involved in studying, plan- 
ning, organizing, constructing, experimenting, testing, servicing, and evaluat- 
ing materials, processes and products of industry. 



318 Department of Industrial Education 

OPPORTUNITIES: Excellent employment opportunities exist for Indus- 
trial Arts teachers. The public schools and colleges of North Carolina, and 
other states, are in constant need of securing qualified teachers for industrial 
arts classes. Many opportunities also exist for industrial arts graduates to 
participate as instructors, supervisors, or directors in various programs of 
industry, government agencies; rehabilitation and manual arts therapy center; 
and private, military and technical schools. Those desiring advanced training 
are prepared for graduate schools. 



OBJECTIVES 

To develop technological competencies in manufacturing, graphics and elec- 
tronic communications, construction, power and transportation industries. 

To develop competencies in educational strategies and techniques, curricu- 
lum construction, evaluation, and media development and use. 

To develop competencies in planning, managing and maintaining industrial 
education facilities. 

To develop proficiencies in using: technological problem-solving processes, 
occupational and consumer knowledge, safety skills and understandings, as 
industrial education content. 

To stimulate scholarly and scientific attitudes towards the problems and pro- 
fession of industrial-technical teaching. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 210, 130 2 2 

Industrial Education 260, 261 2 2 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 3 3 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Physical Science 100 4 — 

Biological Science 100 ^^ 4 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 263, 463 3 2 

Industrial Education 233, 234 3 3 

Industrial Technology 210, 213 3 3 

Industrial Technology 230, 231 3 3 

Industrial Technology 470, 471 3 3 

Speech 250 — 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

Health Ed 200 _2 = 

17 17 



Department of Industrial Education 319 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 462 2 

Industrial Education 412 3 — 

Industrial Education 465, 566 2 3 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Education 400 — 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Elective — 2 

Industrial Technology 253 — 3 

16 17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 510 2 — 

Education 637 — 3 

Industrial Education 662 3 — 

Sociology 100 3 — 

Economics 301 3 1 

Education 436, 500 3 3 

Education 560 — _6 

14 12 

Total: 127 Hours 



VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Since the vocational industrial education teacher works with high school 
students who are interested in training for a single occupation or occupational 
family, his professional preparation must reflect a concentration of study in 
his chosen occupational field. In addition to developing teaching competencies, 
these trainees must choose their concentrated teaching field from five options; 
namely: automotive industry, construction industry, drafting, electrical in- 
dustries and metal industries. 

A high interest in the trade or occupational family and in working with 
people is necessary for success as a teacher in this field. Two years of trade 
experience, beyond the learning period, is required of applicants to this 
teaching field in North Carolina. 



320 Department of Industrial Education 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 260, 261 2 2 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 3 — 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Physical Science 100 4 — 

Biological Science 100 — 4 

Physical Education 1 — 

Technical Option — _3 

17 16 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 263, 463 3 2 

Industrial Technology 230 — 3 

Industrial Technology 470 3 — 

Physics 211, 212 4 4 

Speech 250 — 2 

Technical Options 7 6 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 462 2 — 

Industrial Education 465, 566 2 3 

Agricultural Education 401 2 

Education 400 — 3 

Psychology 230 3 — 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Technical Options 3 3 

Elective _1 = 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 662 3 — 

Education 436, 500 3 3 

Education 560 — 6 

Education 637 — 3 

Health Education 200 2 — 

Sociology 100 3 — 

Economics 301 _3 — 

14 12 

Total: 127 Hours 



Department of Industrial Education 321 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION TECHNICAL OPTIONS 

(Select Concentration in one of the Following Areas) 

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES: 

IE 233 Industrial Arts Drafting 3 

IT 253 Power Technology 3 

IT 254 Automotive Fundamentals 4 

IT 255 Automotive Power Transmission 4 

IT 451 Automotive Instrumentation & System Analysis 4 

IT 452 Automotive Service Management 4 



CONSTR UCTION IND USTRIES: 

IE 432 Architectural Drafting 3 

IT 210 Construction Technology 3 

IT 215 Introductory Processes For Construction Projects 4 

IT 216 Masonry Construction 4 

IT 217 Construction Estimating 4 

IT 441 Major Construction Systems 4 



DRAFTING: 

IT 210 Construction Technology 3 

IE 233 Industrial Arts Drafting 3 

IE 234 Industrial Arts Drafting 3 

IE 235 Technical Drafting 3 

IE 434 Advanced Architectural Drafting 3 

IE 436 Machine Design Drafting 3 

IE 536 Tool and Machine Design 4 



ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES: 

IE 235 Technical Drafting 3 

IT 210 Construction Technology 3 

IT 231 Electronics Circuits 3 

IT 234 Electronic Instrumentation 4 

IT 235 Semi-Conductor Electronics 3 

IT 430 Video Electronics 4 

IT 432 Electronic Communications 2 



METAL INDUSTRIES: 

IE 233 Industrial Arts Drafting 3 

IT 210 Construction Technology 3 

IT 472 Manufacturing Processes Production I 4 

IT 473 Manufacturing Processes Production II 4 

IT 474 Dimensional Metrology 3 

IT 474 Manufacturing Processes Metallurgy 4 



322 Department of Industrial Education 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
Undergraduate 

CRAFTS 

210. Industrial Crafts. Credit 2(1-3) 
Fundamentals of materials, tools and skills used in various industrial craft 

activities. 

211. Designing, Carving and Stamping Leather Craft. Credit 2(1-3) 
Fundamentals of materials, tools and skills used in leather craft. 

218. Repair and Maintenance of Home Furniture. Credit 2(1-3) 

A course designed to help homemaking teachers meet specific problems in 
the improvement and care of home furniture. Instruction in simple upholstery 
techniques and other processes using tools and accessories for home repair. 
Finishing and refinishing wood. Students encouraged to make an effort to 
provide their own work projects. 

412. Upholstery— Furniture Construction. Credit 3(2-6) 
Principles and techniques of webbing, springing, stuffing, padding, and 

covering upholstered furniture. Course includes chair frame construction, 
principles of woodturning, wood finishing and refinishing techniques. 

413. Woodturning. Credit 2(1-3) 
Spindle and face plate turning, re-chucking, plug chucking, finishing and 

polishing on wood lathes. Emphasis on methods and techniques of teaching 
woodturning. 

415. Comprehensive Shop Projects. Credit 2(1-3) 
General construction, repairs, maintenance work or advanced projects in- 
volving woodturning, carving, inlaying, upholstering and wood and metal 
finishing, metals, electricity-electronics, graphic arts. 

510. General Shop. Credit 2(1-3) 

Utilization and organization of multiple activity programs: instructional 
materials, procedures and operating problems. Student activities in various 
aspects of industry. Prerequisite: IE 465. 



GRAPHIC ARTS 
130. Graphic Communication Industries. Credit 2(1-3) 

Technological, socio-economical, occupational and organizational aspect 
of graphic arts printing, publishing and allied industries, associated with pro- 
ducing mass media and oth'er visual materials. 

230. Introduction to Photography. Credit 3(1-5) 

This course is designed to acquaint the beginner with the fundamental 

processes of photography. Training is given in the nomenclature, operation 



Department of Industrial Education 323 

and maintenance of various cameras — the use of exposure meters — film develop- 
ment — contact printing and enlarging — preparation and storage of chemical 
solutions. Each student is required to provide for himself a camera with ad- 
justable f-stops and shutter speeds. 

231. Advanced Photography. Credit 3(1-5) 

This course is a continuation of 230. Emphasis is given to larger cameras — 
studio lighting — portraiture — copying — refinement of darkroom techniques — 
spotting of negatives and prints — selection of chemicals and papers. Students 
showing high competence in both IE 230 and 231 are awarded a Certificate 
of Proficiency. 

233. Industrial Arts Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
A course for acquisition of information and development of skills needed 

by teachers of drafting; Instruction in A.S.A. conventions, projections, revolu- 
tions, developments, lettering and pictorial representation with reference to 
machine, furniture drawing, sheetmetal drawing, shading, technical sketch- 
ing, production illustration and industrial arts design. Prerequisite: Mechani- 
cal Engineering 102. 

234. Industrial Arts Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
Continuation of I. A. 3526, including, basic elements in the planning and 

construction of residential buildings. Problems in floor plans, elevations, de- 
tails and perspective. Study of kitchen living room, dining room, bathroom and 
bedroom' design. Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 233. 

235. Technical Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
Problems involving maps, charts, graphs and electrical drawings. Em- 
phasis on drawings used in design, construction, installation, and mainte- 
nance of electric-electronic equipment; schematic, single line, connection 
and interconnection diagrams; chassis layout, printed circuits, electrical codes 
and standards. Introduction to aircraft and marine drafting. 

430. Technical Illustrations and Design. Credit 3(1-5) 

Survey of design principles, practices and literature. Axonometric illustra- 
tion, templates, overlays, bisuals, perspectives, air brush. 

432. Architectural Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 

Planning residential structures. Construction and design principles floor, 
plot, heating electrical, plumbing plans; elevations, sections, details an per- 
spectives. F.H.A. standards, building codes, cost estimates. Problems selected 
to meet individual needs. 

434. Advanced Architectural Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 

Planning industrial, commercial and public buildings. Construction and 
design principles, materials, specifications and codes; complete plans includ- 
ing: plot, landscaping, framing, electrical and mechanical equipment; struc- 
tural details; reinforced concrete, timber and steel. Advanced perspective 
rendering, analytical study of historical and comtemporary architecture; 
materials, methods and engineering. 



324 Department of Industrial Education 

435. Architectural Design. Credit 3(1-5) 
Planning and structural problems of buildings and their relationship to 

other buildings and space. Studies of urban and rural planning; considera- 
tion of interior planning, landscape, townscape, projects carried to working 
detail. 

436. Machine Design Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
Advanced machine drawing; dimensions, analysis of motion, motion dia- 
grams. Motion layout of threads; spur, bevel, worm gears and cams. Forging, 
pattern, piping, welding, structural practice, nomography; auxiliary views, 
revolutions, pictorial views. A.S.A., S.A.E., Aerospace standards. 

536. Tool and Machine Design. Credit 4(2-4) 

Fundamentals of tool design, cutting tools, punches and die design, gage 
design, jigs and fixtures; indexing and coding procedures. Design, assembly 
and detail drawings of machines, tools and parts. 

PROFESSIONAL 

260. Foundations of Industrial Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
An orientation course in industrial education. Course requirements pro- 
gram operation, regulation. Familiarize the student with the underlying 
philosophy, basic principles, and history of industrial arts and vocational 
education. 

261. Vocational Industrial Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
Planning, organizing, administering, supervising, evaluating and inter- 
preting trade and industrial education programs. Special consideration given 
to organization and responsibilities of local, state and national agencies. 

263. Evolution and Organization of Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical antecendents, trends and future of technology; socio-economic 
and ecological impact; structure, functions, organization and activities of en- 
terprise, personnel and associations related to industry and technology. 

462. School Shop Design & Management. Credit 2(2-0) 
An analysis of general education and industrial education programs and 

objectives. Emphasis on planning and designing shops, equipment selection 
and specifications, shop management, maintenance and safety. 

463. Career Guidance. Credit 2(2-0) 
Principles and techniques of guidance and counseling in junior and senior 

high schools. With emphasis on the study of industrial occupations and 
guidance as it relates to industrial education classes. 

465. Instructional Analysis Techniques Credit 2(2-0) 

Analysis of industrial activities, and educational goals; identification of 
technical, occupational, consumer and recreational need of pupils; delineation 
of curriculum content and instructional materials. Prerequisite: 463. 



Department of Industrial Education 325 

566. Industrial Education Teaching Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 

Educational methodology: Lesson planning, group and individual teaching 
techniques, media development and use, testing and evaluating outcomes in 
industrial courses. Prerequisites: IE 462, 463, 465. 



Observation and Student Teaching— See Education 560. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

616. Plastic Craft. Credit 3(2-2) 
For teachers of industrial arts, arts and crafts, and those interested in 

plastics as a hobby. Operations in plastics analyzed and demonstrated; design, 
color, kinds and uses of plastics, how plastics are made and sold; vocational 
information. Projects suitable for class use constructed. 

617. General Crafts. Credit 3(2-2) 
Principles and techniques of crafts used in school activity programs. Em- 
phasis on materials, tools, and processes used in elementary schools and in- 
dustrial arts courses. Open to all persons interested in craft instruction for 
professional or non-professional use. 

618. Elementary School Industrial Education Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
Aims, content, equipment, and methods utilized in programs designed to 

integrate K-6 elementary school activities with the study of industry and 
technology. 

630. Photography and Educational Media. Credit 3(2-2) 

Nomenclature, operation and maintenance of various still and motion pic- 
ture cameras. The use of exposure meters — film processing — contact printing — 
slide preparation — film editing — copying — enlarging — preparation and storage 
of chemical solutions — print spotting — dry mounting. 

635. Graphic Arts. Credit 3(2-2) 

Fundamentals of typography, hand composition, press operation, block 
printing, silk screen techniques, and other reproduction methods, and book- 
binding. 

660. Industrial Cooperative Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
For prospective teachers of vocational education. Principles, organization 

and administration of industrial cooperative training programs. 

661. Organization of Related Study Materials. Credit 3(3 0) 
Principles of scheduling and planning pupil's course and work experiences, 

selecting and organizing related instructional materials in I.C.T. Programs. 
Prerequisite: I.E. 660. 



326 



Department of Industrial Education 



662. Industrial Course Construction. Credit 3(3-0) 
Selecting, organizing and integrating objectives, content, media and ma- 
terials appropriate to industrial courses. Strategies and techniques of design- 
ing and implementing group and individual teaching-learning activities to 
develop interest awareness of specialization. Prerequisites: IE 462, 463, 465. 

663. History and Philosophy of Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
Chronological and philosophical development of industrial education with 

special emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 



GRADUATE COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

These courses are open only to graduate students. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for descriptions. 

715. Comprehensive General Shop. Credit 3(2-2) 

717. Industrial Arts Problems I. Credit 3(3-0) 

718. Industrial Arts Problems II. Credit 3(3-0) 

719. Advanced Furniture Design and Construction. Credit 3(2-2) 
731. Advanced Drafting Techniques. Credit 3(2-2) 

762. Construction and Use of Instructional Aids. Credit 3(2-2) 

763. General Industrial Education Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 

764. Supervision and Administration of Inudstrial 

Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

765. Testing in Industrial Subjects. Credit 3(3-0) 

766. Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

767. Research and Literature in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

768. Industrial Education Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 

769. Thesis Research in Industrial Education. Credit 3 hrs. 



Department of Industrial Technology 327 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Arlington W. Chisman, Acting Chairman 

The department offers one baccalaureate degree program with four options 
in major technology areas. The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology 
embodies a curriculum to select and prepare technologists for specialization 
and professional responsibilities in the technical-management phase of in- 
dustry. The principal curriculum areas of the degree are as follows: 

1. Major Technology (Option) 

2. Physical Science 

3. Business Management 

4. General Education 

The major technology option is chosen from construction, electronics, auto- 
motive or manufacturing and prepares the student for specialization in the 
chosen field of industrry. A good foundation in the physical sciences and 
mathematics establishes a base upon which continued study and educational 
advancement may be built. Study in the area of business management affords 
the students opportunities for advancement in the managerial and super- 
visory concomitants of his chosen technical option. The general education 
requirements aid the student in the cultural and social maturity providing a 
basis for understanding and performing his role in society. 



ADVANCED STANDING GRANTED AS. DEGREE HOLDERS 

Graduates of Technical Institutes and Community Colleges who have earned 
the Associate in Science Degree in the following areas may be admitted to 
the Industrial Technology programs as juniors: Civil Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering, Electronics Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Mechani- 
cal Engineering and Mechanical Drafting and Design. (Graduates of other 
Technologies are invited to submit their credits for consideration). Specific 
course requirements for these students will have to be made on an individual 
basis after their previously earned credits have been assessed. The typical stu- 
dent in this program will be required to take at least 62 additional semester 
hours. In effect such students will be engaged in a 2 + 2 year program cul- 
minating in earning the B.S. degree here. 

Graduates of our Industrial Technology program have been among the 
most sought after alumni of our University in recent years and are holding 
responsible positions within this country and abroad. 



DEPARTMENTAL OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Industrial Technology are as follows: 

1. To develop an understanding of industry and methods of production and 
the influence of industrial products and services upon the pattern of 
modern social and economic life. 



328 



Department of Industrial Technology 



2. To develop an appreciation of good design and workmanship in their 
application to construction and to manufactured products. 

3. To experience a challenging program of instructional activities designed 
to meet the requirements of employment in modern technology, includ- 
ing science and business management. 

4. To acquire a high degree of competence in his chosen technical elective. 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Phy. Science 100, 

Bio. Science 100 4 4 

M.E. 101, 102 3 3 

Ind. Technology 271, 272 _2_ _2_ 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

History 100, 101 3 3 

I.T. 210 3 — 

I.T. 253 — 3 

Drafting Electives* 3 3 

Physics 211, 212 4 4 

Humanities 200, 201 _3 _3_ 

16 16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Psychology 320 3 

Math 240 Intro, to Programming 

Digital Computers — 

I.T. 575 Mech. of Materials — 

I.T. 230 Elect.-Electronics 3 

Technical Electives 4 

B.A. 220, 422 Bus. Environment & 

Intro, to Management** 3 

Speech Fundamentals 250 — 

Electives _2 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
2 

15 



Department of Industrial Technology 



329 



Senior Year 



Course and Number 
I.T. 476 Industrial Plant Planning 

& Management 

I.T. 411 Communicating Technical Spec. 
I.T. 413 Personnel Realtions & Safety . . 

I.T. 474 Dimensional Metrology 

Accounting 221 Principals of Accounting 

B.A. 522 Personnel Management** 

I.T. 479 Elect. Mechanical Controls .... 

Technical Electives 

Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



3 

4 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



4 
_3 
15 



Total: 124 Semester Hours 

*Drafting Electives are selected in consultation with departmental advisor. 

**The Business courses listed in the Junior and Senior year are recommended. Other business or Eco- 
nomics courses may be acceptable. 
"""Psychology 445 may be substituted. 
NOTE: Military or Air Science is optional. 



TYPICAL 2 YEAR CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 
FOR ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE GRADUATES 

NOTE: First two years of academic credits earned at Technical Institutes or 
Community Colleges. 



Junior Year 

Fall Semster 
Course and Number Credit 

Phy. Sci. 100, Bio. Sci. 100 4 

Soc. Sci. 100, 101 Western 

Civilization I & II 3 

Tech. Electives (Breadth Courses)* 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Mathematics 240 (Computer Science) . . — 

B.A. 220 Business Environment _3 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 

3 
3 
3 
3 

16 



*To be selected from courses in Automotive, Construction, Electronics or Manufacturing where prior 
credits have not been earned. 



330 Department of Industrial Technology 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 
Course and Number Credit Credit 

Accounting 221 Principles of 

Accounting 3 — 

I.T. 474 Dimensional Metrology — 3 

I.T. 411 Communicating Technical Spec. — 2 
I.T. 476 Industrial Plant Planning & 

Management 2 — 

I.T. 479 Elect. Mechanical Control 3 — 

B.A. 442, 522 Intro, to Mgt. & 

Personnel Mgt 3 3 

I.T. 413 Personal Relations & Safety ... 3 — 

Psychology 320 — 3 

Electives _2 _3 

16 14 

TOTAL: 62 Semester Hours 



COURSES FROM WHICH TECHNICAL OPTIONS MAY BE CHOSEN 

(Minimum 16 semester credit hours from the options listed below) 

Semester 
CONSTRUCTION: 

215 Introductory Processes for Construction Projects 4 

216 Masonry Construction 4 

217 Construction Estimating 4 
412 Mechanical Equipment for Buildings 2 

414 Major Construction Systems 4 

415 Finishing Construction Projects 4 
571 Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration 4 

ELECTRONICS: 

231 Electronic Circuits 3 

234 Electronic Instrumentation 4 

235 Semi-Conductor Electronics 3 

430 Video Electronics 4 

431 Electronic Computer Amplifiers 2 

432 Electric Communication 2 

433 Electronic Controls 3 

434 Industrial Electronics 4 

AUTOMOTIVE: 

254 Automotive Fundamentals 4 

255 Automotive Power Transmission 4 

451 Automotive Instrumentation & System Analysis 4 

452 Automotive Service Management 4 
455 Auto Body Rebuilding and Finishing 4 
571 Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration 4 



Department of Industrial Technology 331 

MANUFACTURING: 

472 Manufacturing Processes — Production I 4 

473 Manufacturing Processes — Production II 4 
475 Manufacturing Processes — Metallurgy 4 

570 Mechanical Design and Manufacturing Problems 4 

571 Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration 4 



Industrial Technology Major with the Manpower Concentration 

The Department of Industrial Education & Technology offers a manpower 
concentration which provides an understanding of manpower planning, man- 
power program evaluation and manpower administration. In this concentration 
students gain expertise in coping with problems of employment and additional 
skills for careers in state, city and county government, federal agencies, private 
industry, as well as community manpower agencies. 

Students interested in the manpower concentration should puruse the follow- 
ing module by successfully completing the entire core requirement and select- 
ing a minimum of two electives. 

MANPOWER CONCENTRATION MODULE 







Required Courses 




Electives 






(Complete these) 




(Select two) 


Econ. 


602 


Manpower Problems & 


Econ. 


604 Evaluation Methods 






Prospects 


Psych. 


544 Psychological Testing 


Econ. 


603 


Manpower Planning 


Psych. 


444 Applied Psychology 


B.A. 


569 


Human Resources 
Management Sociology 


Sociol. 


600 Seminar on Social 
Planning 






of Work & Occupations 


i Psych. 


600 Introduction to 


Sociol. 


302 


Economics 305, or 




Guidance 






Psychology 322, 


Psych. 


645 Behavior Modification 






Statistics 


Sociol. 


309 Disability and 


Psych. 


445 


Industrial Psychology 




Employment 


Industr. 


477 


Cooperative Trainining 
In Industry I 






Technol 


.478 


Cooperative Training In 
Industry II 







The Manpower Module courses can be substituted for courses listed in the 
Industrial Technology Curriculum. Credits earned in the manpower concentra- 
tion are creditable toward the 124 minimum semester hours required for the 
Industrial Technology degree. 

Manpower courses can be substituted for the following Industrial Technology 
courses: 

1. Technical Electives 

2. Business & Management 

3. Electives 



332 Department of Industrial Technology 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 
CONSTRUCTION 

210. Construction Technology Credit 3(2-6) 

(Formerly 3522) 
This course is designed to give students experiences about the man-made 
world we live in. It will involve the acquisition and processing of natural ma- 
terials, and how they are molded into the several types of structures to satisfy 
man's wants. It will be concerned, also, with the development (history) of the 
materials and processes that changed construction from its crude beginning 
to its modern trend. 

213. Wood Technology Credit 3(2-6) 

A study of woods, forest products, tools and equipment related to the wood- 
working industry. Attention is given to the practical, natural and industrial 
characteristics of the common species of woods that make them desirable 
for specific manufacturing processes and products. Practicability for home 
consumption is also given consideration. Fastening devices and adhesives used 
in the assembly of furniture and other wood products, as well as the various 
paint materials used in wood finishing are studied. 

215. Introductory Processes For Construction Projects Credit 4(2-4) 
A basic course on the important procedures and planning necessary to initiate 

construction projects. Included are such things as site selection and acquiring 
real estate, surveying and mapping, soil testing and site preparation, earth 
moving and stablizing earth for construction. 

216. Masonry Construction Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of the kinds and uses of masonry units used in building construc- 
tion, specifically brick and concrete. The course covers interpreting working 
drawings and specifications, layout and methods of construction and estimat- 
ing. Construction supervision is also included as it relates to job production 
and quality workmanship. 

217. Construction Estimating Credit 4(4-0) 
This course is designed to enable the student to gain competency in estimat- 
ing the amount of materials, time, labor and equipment required to complete 
a construction project. A practical approach is made of the modern procedures 
of the estimating process to simplify and systematize the preparation of a 
formal estimate. 

410. Human Relations Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of problems in the work-a-day world which will aid one in getting 

along with people on the job, in the community and the home. These units 
of work include: habits one may acquire in order to improve human relations, 
privileges, rights and obligations as a citizen, obtaining and holding a job, 
labor problems, social and commercial insurance and the use of leisure time. 

411. Communicating Technical Specifications Credit 2(2-0) 
This course includes industrial contracts, specifications, codes and other 

statutory regulations, bidding, technical relations and coordinating plans with 
engineers in the areas of Industrial Technology. 



Department of Industrial Technology 333 

412. Mechanical Equipment of Buildings Credit 2(2-0) 
The basic principles and advanced practices in the selection, installation, 

operation and maintenance of equipment in the general areas of water supply 
and sanitation, heating systems and electrical materials, appliances and com- 
munications systems. 

413. Personnel Relations & Safety Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to serve students who are majoring in Industrial Tech- 
nology. Its content focuses on the functions, occupational safety, and the man- 
agement of industry. 

414. Major Construction Systems Credit 4(2-4) 
Modern construction superstructure systems are studied and evaluated in- 
cluding preparations of foundations, erection of mass superstructures of steel, 
wood framing, roofing, enclosing exterior walls, insulation, ceilings and floor- 
ing. 

415. Finishing Construction Projects Credit 4(2-4) 
This is a course in the final phases of typical construction projects including 

exterior and interior trim, painting and decorating, installing accessories, 
completing the site, landscaping, transfer and servicing procedures. 



ELECTRONICS 

230. Electricity and Electronics Credit 3(1-5) 
Types, characteristics, and operation of tubes and semi-conductors. Power 

supplies, detectors, amplifiers, oscillators and associated circuits. Practice in 
assembling and testing electrical and electronic devices. 

231. Electronics Circuits and Systems Credit 3(1-5) 
Operating principles and characteristics of communication and navigational 

systems. A.M., F.M., T.V., Radar, Sonar, Transmission and reception. Prac- 
tice in assembling, testing and analysis of circuits. Prerequisite I.T. 230. 

233. Electric Wiring Credit 2(1-3) 
The study of materials, methods and nomenclature used in residential and 

commercial wiring including a study of National codes, layouts, plans and 
specifications. 

234. Electronic Instrumentation Credit 4(4-0) 
This course emphasizes a variety of electronic instruments such as the 

V.O.M., V.T.V.M., Ohm meters, watt meters, impedance meters, inductance 
checkers, V.U. meters, signal generators, signal tracers, tube testers, simulators, 
analog computer meters, spectrophotometers and oscilloscopes. Their applica- 
tion to electronic analyzation and research is emphasized. 

235. Semi-Conductor Electronics Credit 3(3-0) 
This is a general course in transistor theory. It includes the study of semi- 
conductor physics, zener diodes, silicon diodes, photo-diodes, and photo- 
transistors as these relate to electronic circuits. Prerequisite: 231. 



334 Department of Industrial Technology 

430. Video Electronics Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of deflection signals, amplifiers, synchronization systems, integrat- 
ing networks; microwave, facsimle, R.F. high voltage, pulse circuits and mono- 
chrome networks in video transmitters and receiver systems. Prerequisite: 235. 

431. Electronic Computer Amplifiers Credit 2(2-0) 
This course is designed to cover industrial computer amplifiers, audio fre- 
quencies and magnetic power amplifiers in R.F., V.H.F., and U.H.F., systems. 
Prerequisite: 430. 

432. Electronic Communication Credit 2(2-0) 
The theory of electronics utilized in commercial communication systems 

with the fundamental regulation of the F.C.C. first and second class licenses 
with emphasis on A.M., C.B., F.M. broadcast microphone, recorders and tape 
machines, remote facilities, F.M., T.V. transmitters and monitors. Prerequisite: 
431. 

433. Electronic Control Credit 3(2-2) 
A study of combined control systems utilizing A.C. and D.C. control thyratrons, 

three phase rectification, phase shift preaking transformers and motorspeed 
controls. 

434. Industrial Electronics Credit 4(3-2) 
A survey of industrial electronic computers, microelectronic, solid state 

device, servomechanism, synchros, staturable reactors, ignitrons, and fre- 
quency guidance systems. 



AUTOMOTIVE 

251. Small Engine Credit 2(1-3) 
The principles of engine operations, service and maintenance, trouble shoot- 
ing, adjustments, overhaul and storing of small engines. 

252. Automotive Car and Engine Care Credit 2(1-3) 
A course designed to study basic car maintenance service and the function 

and operation of the modern car's electrical and mechanical components. 

253. Power Technology Credit 3(2-4) 
Introduction to principles and concepts of transmissions. Control of power 

through mechanical, fluid and electrical devices. Emphasis is placed on the 
industrial aspects of power transmission systems. 

254. Automotive Fundamentals Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of the evolution and the latest automotive engine designs. Em- 
phasis on operating principles and fundamental concepts of physics, chemistry 
and electricity related to engine operating systems. 



Department of Industrial Technology 335 

255. Automotive Power Transmission Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of fundamental principles of the automobiles power train com- 
ponents. Emphasis on mechanical and fluid power principles of transmitting 
power and the controlling components brake, steering and etc. 

451. Automotive Instrumentation & System Analysis 

Prerequisite I.T. 254 Credit 4(2-4) 

An introduction to automotive instrumentation and environmental controls. 

Emphasis is on presenting the anatomy and functions of automobile system 

and their effect on the environment, with specific praxiology of modern test 

instruments for systems malfunctions diagnostics and corrections. 

452. Automotive Service Management Credit 4(2-4) 
Prerequisites I.T. 254, 255, 451 

An introduction to automotive management full service concepts. Emphasis 
is on the application of management skills, technics, methods of problem 
solving for efficient and effective management and marketing controls. 

455. Auto Body Repairs and Refinishing Credit 4(2-4) 
A basic course in auto body repairs and construction. Modern methods of 

painting automobiles. Color matching and blending. 

456. Automobile Body Designs and Repairs Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of auto body designs and decisions on repairs or replacements. 

Estimating rebuilding cost. Study of facilities and equipment. 



MANUFACTURING 

271. Introduction to Industrial Technology Credit 2(2-0) 
An introductory course to the world of modern Industrial Technology in- 
cluding a brief history of manufacturing processes and related technology. 
Occupations in Industrial Technology and educational requirements for en- 
tering and advancing in the field are covered. Emphasis will be placed on the 
field of electronics, manufacturing, construction and power technology. 

272. Industrial Technology Processes Credit 2(2-0) 
An introduction to typical problems encountered in industrial technology 

operations including metal manufacturing, power technology, electronics, and 
construction. The use of the slide rule as an aid in problem solving is em- 
phasized. 

275. Fundamentals of Metal Joining I Credit 2(1-4) 
The basic course of theory and practice in gas welding, brazing, soldering, 

cutting, fundamentals of electric arc welding. 

276. Fundamentals of Metal Joining II Credit 2(1-4) 
Continuation of 275 with emphasis on heliarc welding, spot welding, tig 

welding, and the latest techniques of metal joining, X-ray and testing. 



336 Department of Industrial Technology 

470. Manufacturing Industries Credit 3(1-4) 

A basic course in metal mfg. processes involving planning, designing and 
constructing metal products emphasis on bench and sheet metal, forging and 
foundry, basic machine tool operations and finishing. 

471. Metal Technology Credit 3(1-4) 

Advanced study of machine tool operations, heat treating, inspection and 
assembly. Custom and mass production techniques applied to metal products. 

472. Manufacturing Processes— Production I Credit 4(2-4) 

Basic manufacturing techniques with machine tools and precision measur- 
ing instruments. Emphasis is placed on the basic machine tool including the 
lathe milling machine and shaper. Related technical knowledge and new trends 
in the manufacturing process are covered including numberical control, chemi- 
cal milling, etc. 

473. Manufacturing Processes— Production II Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of Plastics and other Materials and their use in Modern Manufactur- 
ing Processes. Tooling, Fabrication Methods and Physical properties, required 
production equipment, etc. 

474. Dimensional Metrology Credit 3(2-2) 

A very basic course, covering the history, the science, and the language of 
measurement. Modern principles are emphasized and recent developments in 
hardware are discussed. This course is fundamental to all the Industrial Tech- 
nology students. 

475. Manufacturing Processes (Metallurgy) Credit 4(3-2) 
A basic course in metallurgy consisting of a study of raw materials, ferrous 

and non-ferrous metals and their manufacture. Basic applied metallurgy 
operations. 

476. Industrial Plant Planning and Material Handling Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4142) 

The principles and techniques of plant layout as applied to modern industry. 
Problems involved in planning new, remodeling old, and expanding present 
industrial facilities that they may better serve their intended purposes. The 
roles of management, materials, man and machinery are stressed. Special 
attention is given to the handling and moving of materials. 

477. Co-operative Training in Industry I Credit 4 
Student must be in Industry full-time for one semester in his major field of 

work and complete any University Co-op requirements. He will be evaluated 
on reports from industry and the University Co-op Coordinator. The hours 
earned will be credited toward required technical electives in the Industrial 
Technology curriculum. Four semester hours credit is the maximum to be 
earned under this arrangement in any one semester. Eight semester hours is 
the maximum to be earned in the co-op arrangement in the Industrial Tech- 
nology Department. 

478. Co-operative Training in Industry II Credit 4 
The description of this course is the same as I.T. 477 and is normally the 

second Co-op experience of the student. 



Department of Industrial Technology 337 

I.T. 479. Electro-Mechanical Control Systems I Credit 3(3-0) 

A general study of electro-mechanical control systems and components used 
to control and monitor machines and other automatic systems. Lectures and 
demonstrations on modern concepts will be a part of the course. 

I.T. 480. Electro-Mechanical Control Systems II Credit 4(2-4) 

An advanced course in electro-mechanical control systems. An in-depth 
study will be made of hydraulic, pneumatic, switching circuits, electric-elec- 
tronic and mechanical devices used in the control of machines and processes. 
The course will consist of lectures, demonstrations, problem solving and lab- 
oratory practice. 

570. Mechanical Design and Manufacturing Problems Credit 4(2-4) 
A basic course in mechanical design procedures and problems of manu- 
facturing. Some recent advances are covered including critical path schedul- 
ing and man machine relations. Prerequisite: 473, 475. 

571. Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of principal equipment; design, load calculations for cooling and 

heating, layouts and controls employed in various types of systems. This 
course is augmented by a practical design problem. 

572. Commercial Refrigeration, Heating and Ventilation Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of steam systems; hot water systems; warm air systems and electrical 

systems used in heating buildings. Load calculation for walk-in cooler and 
deep freezers and drinking water fountains. Special refrigerating devices and 
applications. 

573. Conditioned Air Systems I Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of fundamentals involved in the conditioning of air for comfort. 

Sensible and latent heat transfer, states of matter and humanity. 

574. Conditioned Air Systems II Credit 4(2-4) 
Continuation of 573 with emphasis on controls, heat loads and special types 

of systems. 

575. Mechanics of Materials Credit 3(0-6) 
A study of physical properties of common materials of industry. Simple 

stresses, loads, yield strength, ultimate strength, and factors of safety. Appli- 
cations are made in the areas of riveted and welded joints, pressure vessels, 
and beam design. 

576. Independent Study Credit 3(0-6) 
The student selects a technical problem in his major area for special re- 
search and study in consultation with a faculty member in his area of in- 
terest. He will spend a minimum of 6 hours per week in library research or 
laboratory experimentation. A technical report in standard format will be 
requied for completion and must be approved by two department faculty 
members. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status. 



338 Department of Industrial Technology 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

673. Advanced General Metals I Credit 3(2-2) 
A course in metalwork for teachers of industrial arts. Emphasis will center 

on art metal (including plating, finishes, etc), advanced bench metal, sheet 
metal operations and machine shop. Specifications for equipment, organiza- 
tion of instruction sheets, special problems and materials will be covered as 
well as shop organization. Prerequisite; 471. 

674. Advanced General Metals II Credit 3(2-2) 
An advanced course in metalwork for the industrial arts teacher or other 

persons who may require more specialization in one area of metalwork. With 
the necessary prerequisites, the student may select any area of general metals 
for concentration and special study. Construction of projects, special assign- 
ments, etc. will be made after the area of work is selected and after consultation 
with the instructor. Prerequisite: 673. 

For Graduates Only 
651. Power Industries and Technology Credit 3(2-2) 

Significance of modern power sources in Industrial Technology. Design and 
operating principles of steam, water, hydraulic, pneumatic, internal and external 
combustion units. Nuclear, hydro-electric, gasoline, diesel, turbine rocket, jet, 
fuel cells, solar energy and other systems. Laboratory experiences involving uti- 
lization of power equipment, testing and servicing, with major emphasis on 
portable power plants. 

735. Electricity-Electronics Credit 3(2-2) 

For teachers and prospective teachers of Industrial Arts. Emphasis placed 
on selection and construction of projects useful in school shops, development 
of selected information. Selecting equipment and supplies, course organiza- 
tion and instructional materials. 



Department of Safety and Driver Education 339 

DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

Isaac Barnett, Chairman 

The purpose of the Safety and Driver Education program is to prepare 
qualified individuals as safety and driver education teachers, safety super- 
visors for school districts, state and federal safety personnel, research per- 
sonnel and safety personnel in industry. Both the baccalaureate and master's 
curricula are offered. 

The programs are responsive to regulatory efforts of the state and federal 
government in preparing safety specialists to cope with the hazards produced 
in part by the advancements in technology. 



CURRICULUM FOR SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credits Credits 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Math 111, 112 4 4 

Biological Science 100 4 — 

Physical Education Electives 1 1 

English 100, 101 3 3 

Education 100 — 1 

Elective _2 __3 

17 15 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credits Credits 

Safety and Driver Education 254, 353 .. . 3 3 

Physical Science 100 4 — 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Health Education 200 — 2 

Physics 201 — 3 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

Speech — 2 

Elective __2 _2 

17 17 



340 Department of Safety and Driver Education 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credits Credits 

Safety and Driver Education 356, 454 ... 3 3 

Safety and Driver Education 455, 456 ... 3 3 

Safety and Driver Education 557, 558 ... 3 3 

Economics 301 3 — 

Education 400 3 — 

Psychology 436 — 3 

Sociology 100 3 — 

Industrial Technology 231 — 3 

Elective j = ^ __2_ 

18 17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credits Credits 

Safety and Driver Education 561 — 3 

Safety and Driver Education 655 3 — 

Safety and Driver Education 657 3 — 

Education 500 — 3 

Education 560 — 6 

Education 644 3 — 

Elective _3_ — 

12 12 



COURSES IN SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 
254. Basic Safety and Driver Education 3(2-2) 

This course is designed to present the traffic problem in today's society 
with an overview of the concepts used in traffic accident prevention. Human, 
vehicle, and environmental factors are studied in their relationship to the total 
problem. Laboratories experiences will be designed to improve driving attitudes, 
skills, and knowledge. 

353. Techniques of Laboratory Instruction 3(2-2) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the techniques of the 
in-car, simulation, and range methods of laboratory instruction. Practical ex- 
perience with beginning drivers will be arranged. Prerequisite: S.D.Ed. 254. 

356. Behavioral Aspects of Accident Prevention. 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to study the philosophical and theoretical bases 
of accident prevention efforts in various areas of activities. The behavioral 
task is analyzed from the physiological, medical and physical, psychological, 
sociological, and cultural aspects. A critical analysis of attempt to affect safe 
behavior. Evaluation and written reports required. Planned in consultation 
with instructor. Prerequisite: S.D.Ed. 353. 



Department of Safety and Driver Education 341 

454. First Aid and Emergency Care of the Injured. 3(3-0) 
A combination of methods and procedures for the emergency care of the 

injured with special emphasis on the traffic related problems. First aid care, 
emergency care during disaster, transportation of the injured, and civil de- 
fense are stressed. 

455. Legal Aspects in Safety Education. 3(3-0) 
A study of federal and state laws and judicial interpretations, having 

application to school, industrial, and traffic programs, will be stressed. Prob- 
lems such as teacher liability, workmen's compensation, insurance, and 
traffic laws will be dealt with in respect to their involvement with the indus- 
trial and school traffic safety program. (Consultation with instructor.) 

456. Alcohol and Drugs— In Safety and Driver Education. 3(3-0) 
This course will consist of an investigation into the physiological, psycho- 
logical, and sociological problems presented by the use of alcohol and drugs. 
The problem of alcoholism and drug addiction will be treated; efforts of cure 
and rehabilitation will be explored. Emphasis on the role of alcohol in traffic 
safety and *he role of the school in alcohol education. 

555. Shop Safety Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

This course provides the necessary lesson units and methods of teaching 
school shop safety, as well as plans for developing complete shop safety 
education programs. 

557. Police and Traffic Court Administration. 3(3-0) 
A study of the police and court functions in traffic administration with em- 
phasis on records, direction and control, accident investigation, and procedures. 
Some attention will also be given to parking, pedestrian control, and viola- 
tions bureau operation. Prerequisite: S.D.Ed. 455. 

558. Introduction to Highway Traffic Administration. 3(3-0) 
Examination of the United States' highway system, emphasizing efficient, 

safe operation; activities and agencies concerned with increasing efficiency; 
and systems' development, components, social, economic and political im- 
pacts. Survey of present and future needs. (Consent of instructor.) 

561. Methods of Teaching Safety and Driver Education. 3(2-2) 

Emphasis is placed on methods and techniques of teaching Safety and 
Driver Education in the high schools. Areas of investigation include class- 
room, in-car, range, and simulation methods of instruction. Programmed in- 
struction, team teaching, and other innovative methods will be examined with 
a view to their use in driver education programs. Organization and adminis- 
tration of the high school program will also be covered. Prerequisite: S.D.Ed. 
356. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 
651. Driver Ed. and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides the student with the necessary preparation to adminis- 
ter the in-car phase of high school driver education. Special attention will be 
given to methods of developing safe driving skills and habits. 



342 Department of Safety and Driver Education 

652. Advanced Driver Education and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-2) 
Advanced professional preparation in teaching driver education. Laboratory 

experiences with the multiple car range and driving simulator. Prerequisite: 
S.D.Ed. 651 or its equivalent. 

653. Driver Education and General Safety. Credit 3(3-3) 
Designed to present facts and information concerning the cost, in money and 

human suffering, of accidents in the home, industry, school, and transporta- 
tion. Included is the establishment of knowledge and background conductive 
to the development of personal activities and practices which reduce acci- 
dents. 

654. Highway and Transportation Systems. 3(3-0) 
A description and analytical study of the various transportation systems 

that have developed in this country. Special emphasis will be given to trans- 
portation and its role on economic and social development of communities 
within this country. 

655. Automotive and Technology for Safety and Driver 
Education. 3(2-2) 

A study of the functional systems of the automobiles as they relate to 
traffic safety. 

656. Highway Traffic Administration. 3(3-0) 
This course is to study the origin of traffic laws, the administration of 

motor vehicles and the adjudication resulting from traffic offenses. A critical 
analysis of traffic management procedure: past, present, and future. Also 
explore the agencies involved with traffic study. (Consent of instructor.) 

657. Traffic Engineering in Safety 

and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

An investigation of the vehicle and environmental components of the 
various types of highway transportation systems. Particular emphasis is given 
to highway engineering in relation to the flow of traffic in congested and 
non-congested areas. Traffic studies are performed within the traffic engi- 
neering functions, and traffic planning to improve the efficiency of traffic 
flow and control, and to meet future needs of society. 

658. Curricula Integration of Safety Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
Integration of safety concepts and principles in the kindergarten through 

grade twelve curricula. Philosophy and psychology of safety; strategies, 
techniques, and materials appropriate for the various grade levels. 

659. Motorcycle Safety Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
Theory and laboratory sessions in motorcycle safety education. Emphasis 

on laws, maintenance, skills, and safe riding habits and practices. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

These courses are open only to graduate students. See the Graduate 
School bulletin for descriptions. 

750. Innovations in Safety and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 



Department of Safety and Driver Education 



343 



751. Psychological Factors in Safety and Driver 

Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

752. Alcohol and Safety and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

755. School and Occupational Safety. Credit 3(3-0) 

756. Seminar in Safety and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

757. Administration and Supervision of 

Safety and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

758. Independent Project in Safety and Driver 

Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

759. Thesis Research in Safety and Driver Education. Credit 3(3-0) 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 




SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Suresh Chandra, Dean 

The School of Engineering grants Engineers' Council for Professional De- 
velopment (ECPD) accredited bachelor of science degrees in architectural, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering. The School also grants bachelor of sci- 
ence degrees in engineering mathematics and engineering physics in coopera- 
tion with the Departments of Mathematics and Physics. A newly-authorized 
B.S. level program in industrial engineering will commence operations in the 
Fall, 1977. 

The curricula offerings include a five-year program in architectural engi- 
neering and four year programs in each of the other engineering disciplines. 

The programs of study are aimed toward preparing a student for engineer- 
ing practice in all phases of his chosen field. The specific objectives of the School 
of Engineering are: 

1. To prepare the student for an active career in all facets of professional 
engineering. 

2. To provide a comprehensive background in all phases of the engineering 
design process, namely: conception, planning, synthesis, analysis, design, 
and management. 

3. To provide a basic knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences 
upon which the practice of professional engineering depends. 

4. To develop the judgment the engineer requires to effectively utilize, 
economically, the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of man- 
kind. 

5. To encourage the student to develop an appreciation for the process of 
continuing education. 

6. To develop the intellectual, professional, and social characteristics of the 
student in such a manner as to enable him to become a responsible 
leader in his community. 



ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

The admission requirements are generally the same as those required for 
entrance as a freshman student. However, two units of algebra, one unit of 
plane geometry, and one-half unit of trigonometry are required for students 
who elect to pursue engineering curricula. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A five-year cooperative program, in which students may earn a major portion 
of their educational expenses through a work-study arrangement with in- 
dustry, is available to students with satisfactory scholastic records. 

After satisfactory completion of at least two semesters in the freshman year, 
students in engineering, mathematics or physics may alternate semesters in 



348 Department of Architectural Engineering 

industry with semesters at the University until their senior year. They then 
remain at the university until graduation. This arrangement enables the 
student to receive two years of work experience and at the same time earn 
educational expenses. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Departmental Objectives 

William A. Streat, Jr., Chairman 

It is the aim of the program in architectural engineering to encourage and 
develop students, who exhibit creative ability and who exhibit the ability to 
grasp and use scientific principles, for professional careers in the art and sci- 
ence of building. Strong emphasis is placed on training in the building sciences 
and on training in engineering as it applies to the design and construction of 
buildings. Training provided through exposure and involvement with research 
projects and investigations directed by the architectural engineering faculty is 
encouraged. 

The architectural engineering program provides considerable training in 
general educational which is devoted to study of social and physical sciences, 
art, English, mathematics and the humanities. Introductory courses in archi- 
tectural engineering and a large percentage of the required general education 
courses are scheduled in the freshman and sophomore years. This training, 
during the first and second years, provides background for the study of basic 
engineering science and the study of more professional courses which are 
scheduled later in the program. Instruction within the department of architec- 
tural engineering is organized under four divisions. 

1. Graphics, Architectural Design and Architectural History 

2. Environmental Control, Electrical and Mechanical Equipment of Buildings 

3. Professional Practice, Management, Materials and Methods of Construc- 
tion 

4. Structures 

Each of these divisions has specific course requirements that are aimed to- 
ward the development of the architectural engineering student, so that he will 
be able to take his place in society as a professional in the field of engineering. 

The five year program in architectural engineering leads to the bachelor of 
science degree and is fully accredited by the Engineers' Council for Profession- 
al Development. 



Department of Architectural Engineering 



349 



PROGRAM IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 



Freshman 



Fall 



Course 
Mathematics 
English 
History 



No. 
116 
100 

100 



Architectural Engineering 111 
Chemistry 101 

Chemistry 111 



Cr. 

5 
3 
3 
2 
3 

17 



Spring 

Course No. 
Architectural Engineering 221 

English 101 

History 101 

Geology 309 

Mathematics 117 



Cr. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
5 



17 



Sophomore 



Architectural Engineering 222 
Art 220 

Mathematics 300 

Mechanical Engineering 210 
Physics 221 



3 
2 
4 
3 
_5 
17 



Architectural Engineering 223 
Humanities 200 

Mechanical Engineering 335 
Physics 222 

Mathematics 350 



3 
3 
3 
5 
_3 
17 



Lower Junior 



Architectural Engineering 331 
Architectural Engineering 336 
Architectural Engineering 333 
Electrical Engineering 441 

Mechanical Engineering 336 



3 
2 
3 

4 
4 

16 



Architectural Engineering 332 
Architectural Engineering 337 
Architectural Engineering 334 
Architectural Engineering 335 
Mechanical Engineering 300 
Mechanical Engineering 337 



3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
_3 
16 



Upper Junior 



Architectural Engineering 454 

Architectural Engineering 456 

Architectural Engineering 451 

Mechanical Engineering 441 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Architectural Engineering 455 

Architectural Engineering 457 

Architectural Engineering 458 

Economics 301 
Optional Block 

Mechanical Engineering 416 



2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
17 



Senior 



Architectural Engineering 561 
Architectural Engineering 563 
Architectural Engineering 565 
Elective 
Optional Block 



4 
3 
2 
3 
_3 
15 



Architectural Engineering 562 
Architectural Engineering 564 
Mechanical Engineering 443 
Elective 
Optional Block 



3 
3 
2 
2 

_3 
13 



350 Department of Architectural Engineering 

OPTIONAL BLOCKS 

STRUCTURES 

Architectural Engineering 459 2 

Architectural Engineering 569 3 

Engineering 652 4 

Engineering 644 3 

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND PLANNING 



Architectural Engineering 452 4 

Architectural Engineering 566 4 

Architectural Engineering 453 3 

Architectural Engineering 567 5 



ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 



Architectural Engineering 568 3 
Architectural Engineering 448 3 
Architectural Engineering 449 3 



The completion of at least nine semester hours from one of the optional block 
concentrations is required. 



Freshman 


— 34 


Sophomore 


— 34 


Lower Junior 


— 32 


Upper Junior 


— 32 


Senior 


— 28 


TOTAL 


160 



Courses in Architectural Engineering 

Undergraduate 

111. Architectural Engineering Communications Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture, Seminar, and Laboratory Demonstration: An analysis of architectur- 
al engineering-preparation, opportunities and professional contributions. Se- 
lected lectures and laboratory demonstrations are provided. Individual and 
group participation of students are encouraged. Introduction to use of com- 
puters. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering Freshman. 



Department of Architectural Engineering 351 

221. Architectural Graphics and Communications I Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory-lecture course: Orthographic and auxiliary projections, surface 
intersections and development, oblique and isometric drawing. Use of com- 
puters to solve architectural and engineering problems. Prerequisite: Architec- 
tural Engineering III or equivalent. 

222. Architectural Graphics and Communications II Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory-lecture course. Shades and shadows, perspective drawing, study 
of the architectural plan, elevation and section, architectural presentation 
studies in pencil, pen and ink and water color. Prerequisite: Architectural En- 
gineering 221. 

223. Environmental Control Systems for Buildings I Credit 3(2-1) 

Lecture and laboratory. Electrical and mechanical systems for environment- 
al control of buildings. Comparative analyses of various environmental systems 
and their relation to building design. Elements of basic theory used in the de- 
sign, of electrical and mechanical systems and the controlled environment, for 
buildings. Prerequisite: Mathematics 117 and sophomore standing. 

224. Architectural Engineering Projects Credit Variable (1 to 3) 

Lecture and individual instruction: A project of mutual interest to a student 
and a teacher will be completed. Training shall be within one or more of the ed- 
ucational divisions of architectural engineering. Prerequisite: Sophomore stand- 
ing in architectural engineering. 

331. Architectural Design I Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory-lecture course. Designed to introduce the basic fundamentals of 
design, and as they are applied to architecture; influences on architecture, 
space relationships, form and visible structure. A series of problems is present- 
ed in the design of buildings having simple requirements. Prerequisite: Archi- 
tectural Engineering 222. 

332. Architectural Design II Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory-lecture course. Presenting a series of problems in space organi- 
zation and planning with the study of composition and structure. Prerequisite: 
Architectural Engineering 331. 

333. History of Architecture I Credit 3(3-0 

Illustrated lecture. The early architecture and civilizations of Egypt, Western 
Asia, Greece and Italy; architectural developments by the Early Christian and 
Byzantine builders, and a beginning study of the architecture and civilizations 
of the Medieval period. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 222 and Hu- 
manities 200. 

334. History of Architecture II Credit 3(3-0) 

Illustrated lecture. The architecture and civilizations of the Medieval period, 
and the architecture and civilizations of the Renaissance and of the Early 
Americas. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 333. 



352 Department of Architectural Engineering 

335. Structural Systems I Credit 3(1-4) 

Lectures and laboratory work. Analysis and design of structural systems — an 
overview. Numerical and graphical analyses and solutions. Comparative eval- 
uation of structural systems — environmental, aesthetic and cost considerations. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 335. 

336. Materials & Methods of Architectural Construction I Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture. The manufacture and use of materials for wood frame and masonry 
construction. The study of construction methods and the influence of building 
codes. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 222. 

337. Materials & Methods of Architectural Construction II Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture. The manufacture and use of materials for fire resistive construction. 
The study of construction methods and the influence of building codes. Pre- 
requisite: Architectural Engineering 336. 

448. Architectural Acoustics Credit 3(2-1) 

Lecture-Laboratory Course. Acoustical design and noise control in buildings. 
Study of sound absorption and sound transmission characteristics of building 
materials, surface configurations, and construction details. Prerequisites: Ar- 
chitectural Engineering 337, Physics 222. 

449. Electrical Equipment of Buildings Credit 3(3-0) 

Lecture-problems course. Characteristics of electrical distribution systems, 
computation of electrical power requirements for buildings, theory and design 
of wiring systems and lighting systems for buildings, and the selection of elec- 
trical equipment for buildings. Prerequisites: Physics 222 and Architectural 
Engineering 223. 

451. Architectural Design III Credit 4(0-8) 

Laboratory-lecture course presenting a series of problems for study of space 
analysis, space organization, form and function. Integration of design and con- 
struction methods and the organization of structural components. Prerequisite: 
Architectural Engineering 332. 

452. Architectural Design IV Credit 4(0-8) 

Laboratory-lecture course presenting a series of problems in the design, 
analysis, and organization of buildings. Economic and social considerations 
are given to problems. Group planning, mass and orientation are studied for 
more complex building requirements. More detailed study and presentation is 
required to emphasize the complete architectural complex. Prerequisite: Arch- 
itectural Engineering 451. 

453. History of Architecture III Credit 3(3-0) 

Illustrated lecture. An analytical study of Modern and Contemporary Archi- 
tecture. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 444. 

454. Reinforced Concrete Theory I Credit 3(3-0) 

Lecture-problems course. Reinforced concrete theory as applied to building 
structures. Theory of design for beams, slabs, and columns. Allowable stress 



Department of Architectural Engineering 353 

and ultimate strength concepts. Bending of reinforced concrete columns. Pre- 
requisites: Architectural Engineering 335 and Mechanical Engineering 336. 

455. Reinforced Concrete Theory II Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture-problems courses. Footings and retaining walls, theory of design for 
continuous reinforced concrete beams and slabs. Prerequisite: Architectural 
Engineering 454. 

456. Theory of Structures I Credit 3(3-0) 

Lecture problems course. Reactions, shears, and moments, truss analysis, 
influence lines and criteria for maximum moving load conditions. Introduction 
to space frames. Portal and cantilever approximate methods of analysis. Mo- 
ment area theorems and deflections. Prerequisites: Architectural Engineering 
335 and Mechanical Engineering 336. 

457. Theory of Structures II Credit 3(3-0) 

Lecture problems course. Elastic weights and the conjugate beam. Virtual 
work solutions, Maxwell's Law and Williot-Mohr methods of analysis. Anal- 
ysis of statically indeterminate problems by consistent deformation, fixed 
points, Castigliano's theorems, three moment equations, slope deflection, mo- 
ment distribution. Computer solutions. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineer- 
ing 456. 

458. Production Drawings Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory course: Design development drawings and architectural working 
drawings. Production of small scale general drawings including plans and ele- 
vations, large scale detail drawings and schedules. Prerequisites: Architectural 
Engineering 332, 337. 

459. Photo-Elastic Stress Analysis Credit 2(1-2) 

Stress-strain relationships, light polarization, isoclinics, isostatics and prin- 
ciples of strain measurements. Use of photo-elastic reflective coatings and 
models of photo-elastic materials. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 336. 

561. Structures I Credit 4(2-2) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Theory and design of structural components: ten- 
sion members, compression members and beams. Connections-Design of stat- 
ically determinate systems. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 456. 

562. Structures II Credit 3(2-2) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Multistory frames: gravity and lateral loads. De- 
sign of building frames. Limit design. Three hinged arches. Composite con- 
struction. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 561. 

563. Statically Indeterminate Structures Credit 3(3-0) 

Lecture-problems: Analysis of continuous beams and rigid frames. Approxi- 
mate methods and special techniques: slope deflection, moment distribution, 
column analogy. Introduction to design of statically indeterminate systems. 
Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 455, 457. 



354 Department of Architectural Engineering 

564. Foundation and Soil Structures Credit 3(1-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Origin and composition of soils, soil structure. Flow 
of water through soils, capillary and osmotic phenomena. Soil behavior under 
stress: compressibility; shear strength. Elements of mechanics of soil masses 
with application to problems of bearing capacity of foundations, earth pres- 
sure on retaining walls, and stability of slopes. Prerequisite: Upper Junior 
Classification. 

565. Professional Practice Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture. Procedures of professional practice, registration, ethics, professional 
services, contracts, bonds, liens, insurance, bidding procedures, supervision, 
and administration of construction operations, office management. Prerequi- 
site: Upper Junior Classification. For majors in architectural engineering only. 

566. City Planning and Urban Design I Credit 4(2-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory Course: History of city planning and urban design; 
general problems of city planning and urban design-architectural space com- 
position. Theory of space composition. Regional and urban planning; Scale of 
the plan for region and city. Transportation in the city; the city as a human unit. 
Greenery in the city. Location of the residential areas, industry, business and 
commerce, etc. Location criteria. Design of the neighborhood unit. Prerequisites: 
Juniors enrolled in the program of the Transportation Institute and Architec- 
tural Engineering majors of junior classification. Open to practicing design 
professionals. 

567. City Planning and Urban Design II Credit 5(2-6) 

Lecture and Laboratory Course: New outlooks on the city and the city plan- 
ning process. High-rise and flat cities, low-rise housing in the city. Space com- 
positional factors. Places of public interest. Places of aesthetical attraction in 
the city. Transportation, and extension of the city. Types of housing such as 
row housing, twin housing, etc. High-rise city (high-flat housing); density of 
population, and scale of the city. Plans for high-rise housing, low income hous- 
ing and industralized technology in low income housing. Design of the city 
plan. Cooperation with the transportation engineer, economist, sociologist, etc. 
Prerequisites: Architectural Engineering 566 and 332. Open to practicing de- 
sign professionals. 

568. Environmental Control Systems for Buildings II Credit 3(0-6) 

Laboratory Course: Development of complete environmental systems for 
buildings. Includes mechanical and electrical systems, as they are integrated 
with architectural design, structural design, and building construction. Pre- 
requisites: Mechanical Engineering 561, Architectural 323, Architectural En- 
gineering 449. 

569. Experimental Structural Analysis Credit 3(1-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Photo-elastic stress analysis and mini-measure- 
ment techniques will be used to analyze structural components. Prerequisite: 
Architectural Engineering 563. 



Department of Electrical Engineering 355 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Winser E. Alexander, Chairman 

At the undergraduate level the electrical engineering program includes train- 
ing in matematics, basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, and engineering. 
Each undergraduate together with his advisor develops a program to match in- 
dividual needs and interests; e.g., Coop activity, evening classes, special inter- 
ests in computer engineering, special interest in engineering education. 

The Student Branch of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 
sponsors professional activities. An Eta Chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the national 
honorary electrical engineering society, encourages scholastic and leadership 
development. 

The department participates in offering the Master of Science in Engineer- 
ing degree. Prospective graduate students should consult the Graduate School 
catalog. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

A minimum of 127 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in electrical engineering. These 127 hours are outlined as follows: 

MATHEMATICS 21 hrs. 

Math 116, 117, 300, 500 and three hours of advanced mathematics are 
required. 

BASIC SCIENCES 19 hrs. 

Chemistry 101, 111, and Physics 221, 222, and 406 are required. The re- 
maining hours may be chosen from Chemistry, or Physical Science, or 
Biological Science, or Earth Science upon consultation with and written 
consent of departmental advisor. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES 25 hrs. 

A minimum of six hours of Freshman English and three hours of History 
are required. Upon consultation with and written consent of departmental 
advisor, the remaining hours must be chosen within a minimum of two de- 
partments: Art, English, Foreign Languages, Music, Economics, History 
and Political Science, Sociology and Social Welfare, Psychology and Guid- 
ance. 

FREE ELECTIVES 5 hrs. 

Chosen from any department. 

ENGINEERING 57 hrs. 

Twelve hours of Mechanical Engineering, 335, 337, 361, and 441 are re- 
quired. 

Thirty-seven hours of Electrical Engineering including 400, 430, 450, 
and 460 are required. (EE 100, 101, 200, 300, 320, and 325 provide the pre- 
requisites.) 

Eight hours of advanced engineering courses are required. 

*****See your electrical engineering advisor in the formulation of your undergraduate program or write: 
Chairman, Department of Electrical Engineering, North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, 
N. C. 27411. 



356 Department of Electrical Engineering 

Sample Program #1 

CAUTION: This is one sample program derived from the electrical engineer- 
ing UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM. See your advisor for 
planning an individual program. 



Freshman 

212-100 Fresh Comp 1 3 212-101 Fresh Comp 11 3 

223-101 Gen Chem 1 3 225-117 Engg Math 11 5 

223-111 Gen Chem Lab 1 1 227-221 Gen Phys 1 5 

225-116 Engg Math 1 5 420-101 Intf EE 11 4 

420-100 Intf EE 1 _4 

16 17 



Sophomore 

420-200 E Ckt Anal 4 440-335 Mech. 1, Statistics 3 

227-222 Gen Phys 11 5 420-300 E Ckt Anal & Synt 4 

225-300 Ord Dif Equ 4 420-320 Electronics 1 4 

233-100 His Wes Civ 3 225-500 Intro Appl Math 4 

_ ** Elective _2 

16 17 



Junior 

420-460 Electronics 11 4 420-450 EM Rad & M Th 3 

420-325 Prin EM Waves 3 440-361 Fluid Mech 3 

420-400 Sig Anal & Proc 3 227-406 Mod Phys 1 3 

440-441 Themo 1 3 440-337 Mech 11 Dyna 3 

** Elective _3 ** Elective _3 

16 15 



Senior 

420-430 El Mach 1 4 

** Electives 10 ** Electives 16 

14 16 



"For outline and selection of electives see the electrical engineering UNDERGRADUATE CURRICU- 
LUM. Copies available from: Chairman, Department of Electrical Engineering, North Carolina A & T 
State University, Greensboro 27411. 



Department of Electrical Engineering 357 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Department Code— 420 

100. Interface to Electrical Engineering Credit 4(3-3) 

An introductory course for freshmen engineering majors. Applications of 
Algebra, Matrices, Trigonometric functions, etc. as engineering tools. Use of 
the slide rule and digital computer as computational aids. Resistive circuit the- 
ory. Coordinated laboratory work. 

101. Interface to Electrical Engineering II Credit 4(3-3) 

A continuation and expansion of EE 100. Fundamental laws and theorems 
of linear circuit theory coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 100, 
Corequisite Math 116. 

200. Electric Circuit Analysis Credit 4(3-3) 

Transient and steady state solutions to first and second order linear systems 
in the time and frequency domains; introduction to time varying and nonlinear 
systems. Coordinated laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: EE 101, Corequisite: 
Math 300. 

300. Electric Circuit Analysis and Synthesis Credit 4(3-3) 

Periodic function analysis of n'th order linear systems, Fourier series and 
Laplace transform techniques, and introductory synthesis techniques with 
coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 200, Corequisite: Math 500. 

320. Electronics I Credit 4(3-3) 

A study of active devices with emphasis on terminal behavior. Physical elec- 
tronics, linear and nonlinear modeling. Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequi- 
site: EE 200, Corequisite: Math 500. 

325. Principles of Electromagnetic Waves Credit 3(3-0) 

Electromagnetic concepts and effects, vector analysis. Corequisite: Math 
500, EE 300. 

400. Signals: Analysis and Processing Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of system responses to signals using convolution, Fourier integral, 
spectral sampling, correlation, and probabilistic techniques. Prerequisite: EE 
300 or consent of instructor. 

441. Basic Electrical Engineering I Credit 4(3-3 

Electrical engineering, fundamentals and applications for non-electrical 
engineering students. Electric and magnetic fields; network theory and appli- 
cation; direct and alternating current apparatus. Coordinated laboratory work. 
Prerequisites: Physics 222 and Math 117. 

442. Basic Electrical Engineering II Credit 4(3-3) 

Electronic circuit theory and applications; control of electrical apparatus; 
electro-chemical processes; electronic analog and digital computer principles. 
Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 441. 



358 Department of Industrial Engineering 

430. Electric Machinery I Credit 4(3-3) 

Electromechanical energy conversion principles; basic rotating machines; 
steady state and transient analysis of the ideal d-c machine, synchronous ma- 
chine and induction machine. Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 
300 and EE 325. 

450. Electromagnetic Radiation and Microwave Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

The basic postulates of electromagnetism; the integral laws of free space; 
the differential laws in free space; static fields; time varying fields. Prerequi- 
site: EE 325. 

460. Electronics II Credit 4(3-3) 

A continuation of Electronics I. Principles of semiconductor electronic cir- 
cuits; rectifiers and filters; amplifiers; feedback and oscillatory systems. Coor- 
dinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 320. 

571. Electric Machinery II Credit 4(3-3) 

Physical factors influencing performance of the realistic machine; single and 
three phase transformers; D-C machine characteristics and applications; syn- 
chronous and ployphase induction machine characteristics; fractional-horse- 
power a-c machines. Coordinated laboratory experience. Prerequisite: EE 430. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Philip E. Hicks, Chairman 

The Department of Industrial Engineering, the latest addition to the School 
of Engineering, will commence operations in Fall, 1977. Specific curriculum re- 
quirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering will 
be available prior to formal initiation of the department. The American Insti- 
tute of Industrial Engineers defines the field as follows: 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, improvement, and 
installation of integrated systems of men, materials and equipment. It 
draws upon specialized knowledge and skill in the mathematical, physical, 
and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineer- 
ing analysis and design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be 
obtained from such systems. 

Industrial engineering is the newest and, consequently, the least known of 
the four major engineering demand fields (i.e., electrical, mechanical, civil and 
industrial engineering). It is, however, the most rapidly growing major engi- 
neering discipline on a percentage growth basis. 

Industrial engineers traditionally have been concerned with the design of 
production systems and the design of management controls for such systems. 
The generality of the techniques has led in recent years to the design and con- 
trol of "productive" systems (i.e., any system that produces a product or ser- 
vice). Therefore, although industrial engineers are typically identified with the 
design and control of manufacturing systems, more than half of present indus- 
trial engineering graduates enter such productive systems as hospitals, insur- 
ance companies, banking, retailers, wholesalers, distributors, research organi- 
zations, municipal governments and consultants. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 359 

Additional information concerning the industrial engineering program can 
be obtained from the Office of the Dean of the School of Engineering. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Reginald G. Mitchiner, Chairman 

Mechanical Engineering is that branch of engineering concerned with the 
conversion of other forms of energy to and from mechanical energy forms and 
processes associated with this type of energy conversion. Thus the mechanical 
engineer studies thermoscience, the release, transfer, and conversion of therm- 
al energy into mechanical or electrical forms; machine design, the synthesis of 
machines necessary for these conversion processes and the allied areas of engi- 
neering. 

It is the goal of the Department of Mechanical Engineering to produce, 
through its educational programs, graduates with a comprehensive background 
in mathematics, the physical and social sciences, and the humanities, along 
with a thorough grounding in engineering fundamentals and mechanical engi- 
neering specialities. These graduates should be competent in the engineer- 
ing techniques related to the planning, design, analysis, and synthesis re- 
quired in the implementation of mechanical engineering projects. Further the 
programs of the department shall be consistent with the requirements of ac- 
crediting agencies and the needs of the profession. 

Consistent with its goals, the Department of Mechanical Engineering offers 
a program combining a general collegiate background, and basic engineering 
topics with coverage of each of the areas mentioned above. This program pre- 
pares the student for a number of different career paths which include engi- 
neering practice in industry, government or private practice or further train- 
ing. Those areas of mechanical engineering in which a student may choose to 
concentrate his studies are Energy Conversion or Machine Design. Other areas 
in which there are course offerings include engineering mechanics and engi- 
neering materials. 

PROGRAM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English, 100, 101 3 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

*Mathematics 116, 117 5 5 

Mechanical Engineering 100, 226 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering 103 2 — 

Chemistry 101 — 3 

Chemistry 111 — \ 

16 18 



*Students entering with a deficiency in mathematics or score low on the Mathematics Placement Exami- 
nation must begin with Pre-Engineering Mathematics and the above mathematics sequence would be 
shifted one semester. 



360 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mechanical Engineering 210, 336 2 

Mechanical Engineering 260, 337 3 

Mechanical Engineering 335 3 

Physics 221, 222 3 

Physics 231, 232 2 

Mathematics 300 — 

Humanities 200 _3 

16 



Spring Semester 

Credit 

4 

3 

3 
2 
4 

16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mechanical Engineering 416, 440 3 

Electrical Engineering 441, 442 4 

Mechanical Engineering 441, 442 3 

Mechanical Engineering 474 — 

Mechanical Engineering 562 — 

Mathematics 500 4 

Electives _3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 
3 
4 
4 
3 
4 



18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Economics 301 3 — 

Mechanical Engineering 564, 443 2 3 

Mechanical Engineering 560, 574 3 3 

Electives _6 _9 

15 14 

Total Credit Hours: 130 



Elective Hours 



3 Free Electives 

9 Technical Electives, 6 of which must be from 

Option Block 
6 Humanities-social science 



Energy Conversion Option 

540 Dynamics of Mechanical 540 

Engineering Systems 

563 Energy Conversion 565 

570 Internal Combustion Engines 566 

571 Turbomachinery 567 



Machine Design Option 
Dynamics of Mechanical 

Engineering Systems 
Machine Design II 
Mechanical Vibrations 
Experimental Stress Analysis 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 361 

COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Department Code— 440 

Undergraduate 

100. Engineering Orientation and Analysis Credit 3(2-3) 

Introduction to engineering and mechanical engineering, engineering op- 
portunities; tools and processes of engineering; applications of trigonometry, 
geometry, and algebra to engineering problems; introduction to slide rule and 
digital computer; measurements and experimental techniques, plant visits. 

101. Engineering Graphics I. Credit 3(0-6) 

Instrument practice: lettering; geometrical construction; projections; sec- 
tions; auxiliary projection; revolution; pictorial drawing; intersection and de- 
velopment. Drawings of fasteners, springs and gears; detail and assembly 
drawings; tracing and reproduction methods. 

102. Engineering Graphics II Credit 3(0-6) 

Representation of common geometrical magnitudes, with points, lines, 
planes, and solids; concurrent noncoplanar forces; the solution of problems; 
advanced intersection and development. Prerequisite: M.E. 101. 

103. Introduction to Graphics Science Credit 2(0-4) 

Instrument and freehand drawing of structures and machine parts, lettering, 
sectional and auxiliary views, dimensioning, conventional drafting practices. 

200. Engineering Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 

The introduction of technical writing, applications of mathematics and sci- 
ence in engineering problems, and the tools of engineering; the electronic 
analog computer, electronic digital computer and the slide rule are presented 
as tools for solving matrix problems and other related problems. Prerequisite: 
Math. 116; M.E. 100 or equivalent. 

210. Computational Methods in Engineering Credit 2(2-0) 

A review of digital computer programming techniques and an introduction 
to numerical solution methods applicable to engineering problems. Emphasis 
is placed upon error analysis, evaluations of functions and roots, integral eval- 
uations and solutions to systems of equations. Includes engineering case stu- 
dies. Prerequisites: M.E. 100 or Math. 240 or equivalent. 

226. Manufacturing Processes Credit 3(2-2) 

Fabricating methods by machining, forming, casting, welding and adhesive 
bonding; measuring and gaging; automation; numberical control of machine 
tools; economics of metal manufacturing; plastics. 

260. Materials Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental nature of materials, physical, mechanical and chemical char- 
acteristics, atomic arrangements and atomic bonding; phase diagrams; prop- 



362 Department of Mechanical Engineering 

erties and engineering requirements of materials; testing and examination, 
review and selection of materials for specific use. Prerequisite: Consent of In- 
structor. 

300. Plane Surveying Credit 2(1-3) 

The methods of using the compass, transit, tape and level in making plane 
surveys. Lectures and field work. Elementary stadia work. Prerequisite: Trig- 
onometry, Math. 110 or equivalent. 

335. Mechanics I, Statics Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic vector concepts of force, moment of a force; analytical and graphical 
techniques in the analyses of force and moment; conditions of equilibrium in 
frames, trusses, machine members under static loads; law of friction; distrib- 
uted forces; determination of centroid, mass center, area and mass moment of 
inertia. Prerequisites: Math. 116; concurrent with Physics 221. 

336. Strength of Materials Credit 4(3-2) 

Introduction to normal and shearing stresses; analysis of shear and moment 
distribution in beams; shear and fiber stresses in beams; deflection of beams; 
torsional stresses in shafts, springs, critical loads in beam-columns; analysis of 
combined stresses; experimental work on the mechanical behavior of material 
including concrete and wood; experimental determination of fatigue and im- 
pact properties; determination of hardness of various materials. Prerequisite: 
M.E. 335. 

337. Mechanics II, Dynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies in translation, ro- 
tation and plane motion; introduction to the concepts underlying the work- 
energy principles and impact-momentum principles. Prerequisite: M.E. 335. 

416. Fluid Mechanics Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles of static and dynamic behavior of incompressible fluids with some 
applications to fluid machinery. Experimental work in fluid mechanics and in- 
strumentation. Prerequisite: Math. 300 and M.E. 335. 

433. Engineering Topics Variable Credit 1-3 

This course will allow the presentation of topics which will meet the require- 
ments for a Free Elective, but not a Technical Elective. Topics covered are non- 
recurring, but the course is aimed at a broader audience than M.E. 544. Ap- 
proval of syllabus and other course details must be secured from the Depart- 
ment chairman. 

440. Kinematics Credit 3(2-2) 

A condensed course covering relative motions, velocities and accelerations 
of machine parts including linkage, cams and gears. Prerequisite: M.E. 337. 

441. Thermodynamics I Credit 3(3-0) 

Thermodynamic properties of substances. Development of the first and sec- 
ond laws on a macroscopic system basis. Application to thermodynamic pro- 
cesses involving ideal and real gases. Prerequisites: Math. 300 and Chem. 101. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 363 

442. Thermodynamics II Credit 4(3-3) 

A continuation of Thermodynamics I including first and second law of appli- 
cations to power, heating, and refrigeration cycles. The subjects of gas mix- 
tures, psychrometrics and heat transfer are introduced. Experimental work in 
thermal sciences. Prerequisite: M.E. 441. 

443. Engineering Economy Credit 2(2-0) 

Principles of finance and cost, interest and formulas, present worth, annual 
cost and rate of return models, decision making among alternatives: replace- 
ment models, break-even and minimum cost, depreciation, economic analysis 
of operations; mathematical models for inventory, waiting lines and linear 
programming. Prerequisite: Economics 301. 

444. Undergraduate Projects Variable Credit 1-3 

Study arranged on engineering topics of interest to student. A faculty mem- 
ber will serve as project advisor. Topics may include analytical and/ or experi- 
mental work and encourages independent study. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department and agreement of faculty member as advisor. 

461. Transportation Engineering I Credit 3(3-0) 

The transportation system and development, technological characteristics of 
transport modes, traffic control devices, planning studies, planning models. 
Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of Instructor. 

462. Transportation Engineering II Credit 3(3-0) 

Traffic surveys, traffic volume and capacity studies; Designs of land, air, and 
water transportation facilities; Analysis and design of urban mass transit sys- 
tems. Prerequisites: M.E. 461 or consent of Instructor. 

474. Engineering Design Credit 3(2-2) 

Survey of techniques to aid engineering design. Short projects will be the ve- 
hicles for illustrating various aspects of design. Projects will include: Litera- 
ture reviews, mathematical-computer simulation, laboratory experiments and 
design-construction projects. Prerequisites: Math. 300, M.E. 441 and M.E. 336. 

540. Dynamics of Mechanical Engineering Systems Credit 3(2-2) 

A unified treatment of mechanical, fluid, and thermal dynamic systems. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the physical characteristics of the systems, mathematical 
model formulation, exercise of models through modern computational tech- 
niques, and correlation of model behavior with that of existing systems. The 
synthesis and design of systems through model manipulation is covered. Pre- 
requisites: M.E. 562, 442, 440; E.E. 442. 

544. Special Topics Variable Credit (1-3) 

A senior level course on topics not covered in other mechanical engineering 
courses. There is to be a title specified for the course, which indicates the con- 
tents. The students records will carry both course number and name. This 
course will satisfy the requirements for a Technical Elective, and approval of 
the syllabus and other course details must be secured from the department cur- 
riculum committee. 



364 Department of Mechanical Engineering 

560. Metals, Ceramics, and Polymers Credit 3(2-2) 

Atomic structure and microstructure; properties of materials; alloying heat 
treatment and other processing; environmental degradation; engineering uses 
and design with various materials; experiments of microstructures, heat treat- 
ment, mechanical properties, corrosion, oxidation and degradation. Pre- 
requisite: M.E. 226 and M.E. 260. 

561. Environmental Control Credit 4(3-2) 

Principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to design of 
environmental control systems; determination of building, heating and cooling 
loads, principal equipment, layout and controls are discussed for various types 
of systems. 

562. Heat and Mass Transfer Credit 4(3-3) 

Relation of heat transfer to thermodynamics. Conduction of heat in steady 
and unsteady states. Heat transfer by radiation, free and forced convection. 
Mass diffusion. Experimental work in heat transfer. Prerequisites: M.E. 416 
and M.E. 441. 

563. Energy Conversion Credit 3(3-0) 

Energy usage and supplies. Analysis of steam and air power cycles, thermo- 
electric, thermionic, and magnetohydrodynamic conversion processes and fuel 
cells. Discussion of solar, wind geothermal and nuclear energy sources. Pre- 
requisite: M.E. 442. 

564. Machine Design I Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to the design process; the design and development of machine 
elements; computer-aided design; project work. Prerequisites: M.E. 336 and 
M.E. 440. 

565. Machine Design II Credit 3(3-0) 

Continuation of the design and development of machine elements; analysis, 
synthesis and design of machine systems; project work. Prerequisites: M.E. 
564 and M.E. 560. 

566. Mechanical Vibrations Credit 4(3-2) 

An introduction to the dynamics of systems with and without external damp- 
ing, stability, lumped and distributed. Vibration isolation mounts and control 
systems are analyzed with classical differential equations, electromechanical 
analogies and computer methods. Prerequisites: M.E. 336 and M.E. 337. 

567. Experimental Stress Analysis Credit 3(2-2) 

Theory and methods for measuring strain, including strain gages, photo- 
elasticity, and brittle coatings. Prerequisite: M.E. 336. 

568. Gas Dynamics Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles of one-dimensional compressible fluid flow. Normal shocks. Flow 
with friction, heating and cooling. Introduction to two-dimensional flows. Ex- 
perimental work in fluid flow. Prerequisites: M.E. 416 and 441. 



Graduate Program in Engineering 365 

570. Internal Combustion Engines Credit 3(2-2) 

Fundamental principle of spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines; 
the combustion phenomena; the effect of fuel-air mixture; design of compon- 
ents of an internal combustion engine; testing and performance curves; design 
project. Prerequisites: M.E. 440, 442. 

571. Turbomachinery Credit 3(2-2) 

The Cascade theory, applied to turbomachines; impulse and reaction tur- 
bines; compressible fluid dynamics, gas turbine principle; pumps, compressor 
and blowers; design of turbomachine elements, project work. Prerequisites: 
M.E. 416, M.E. 442. 

572. Mechanical Engineering Seminar I Credit 1(0-2) 

Reports and discussions on special topics in mechanical engineering and re- 
lated fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing in mechanical engineering. 

573. Mechanical Engineering Seminar II Credit 1(0-2) 

Continuation of Mechanical Engineering 572. Prerequisite: Senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering. 

574. Mechanical Systems Analysis Credit 3(1-4) 

Application of the engineering and mathematical techniques in the design of 
mechanical systems; solution of mechanical engineering problems, or a re- 
search activity; Group problems are selected by the students from actual prob- 
lems in industry and research; Lectures cover an introduction to types of de- 
sign projects, the design process, decision and optimization techniques, and 
computer-aided design. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING 

Suresh Chandra, Dean 

The School of Engineering offers a program of advanced study leading to 
the Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.). The central emphasis of the 
program is interdisciplinary — breaking with the traditional departmentalized 
specialization. The program has been developed in such a way as to permit 
a graduate engineering student to pursue advanced education which will pre- 
pare him for advanced professional practice or for further graduate study. 

Formal instruction is offered in several areas of engineering such as analog 
and digital systems, engineering mechanics, industrial operations, mechani- 
cal and electrical systems, and structural engineering. However, the in- 
structional areas are not limited to these topics. The programs reflect inter- 
disciplinary emphasis and are coordinated by the student's advisory com- 
mittee in such a way as to meet the professional needs and experience of 
each student. Both thesis and non-thesis options are offered for the M.S.E. 
program. A minimum of 30 approved semester hours, including 6 hours of 
thesis, are required for the thesis option whereas at least 33 approved hours 



366 Graduate Program in Engineering 

are required for the non-thesis option. At least half of the required courses, 
excluding thesis, must be at 700-level. All 600 and 700-level courses are of- 
fered in the evening. The M.S.E. program may be pursued on full or part- 
time basis. 

Further details on admission and academic requirements, financial assistance, 
etc. may be obtained from the Graduate School Bulletin or the Graduate Pro- 
gram Catalog of the School of Engineering. 



ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES 
Department Code— 400 

Number and Course Credit 

602 Advanced Strength of Materials 3(3-0) 

603 Advanced Thermodynamics 3(3-0) 

604 Analog Computer Applications 3(2-3) 
606 Automatic Control Theory 3(3-0) 
612 Communication Systems 3(3-0) 
614 Communication Theory 3(3-0) 
622 Electronic Engineering 4(3-3) 

624 Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory 3(3-0) 

625 Engineering and Environment 3(2-3) 

626 Engineering Research Credit Variable 

627 Fundamentals of Logic Systems 3(3-0) 

628 Foundation Engineering 3(2-2) 
632 Information Theory 3(3-0) 
634 Instrumentation Theory and Applications 3(3-0) 
642 Management, Organization and Industrial Economics 3(3-0) 
644 Matrix Analysis of Structures 3(2-2) 
646 Network Synthesis 3(3-0) 
648 Numerical Analysis for Engineers 3(3-0) 
650 Operations Research 3(3-0) 
652 Plates and Shells 4(2-4) 

654 Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems 3(1-6) 

655 Professional Development I Variable (1-3) 

656 Professional Development II Variable ( 1-3) 
660 Selected Topics in Engineering 3(3-0) 
666 Special Projects Variable (1-3) 
670 Semiconductor Theory 3(3-0) 
672 Theory of Elasticity 3(3-0) 
674 Transmission of Signals and Power 3(3-0) 



Graduate Program in Engineering 367 

GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are offered to graduate students only. For descriptions, please 
refer to the Graduate School Bulletin or the School of Engineering Graduate 
Program Catalogue. 

Number and Course Credit 

700 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design 3(2-2) 

701 Advanced Structural Analysis 3(3-0) 

702 Applied Numerical Methods 3(3-0) 
710 Boundary Layer Theory 3(3-0) 
715 Continuum Mechanics 3(3-0) 
722 Electromagnetic Wave Theory 3(3-0) 
724 Electronic Systems Analysis 3(3-0) 
728 Experimental Stress Analysis 3(2-2) 

735 Heat Transfer I— Conduction 3(3-0) 

736 Heat Transfer II— Radiation 3(3-0) 
738 Irreversible Thermodynamics 3(3-0) 
740 Machine Tool Design 3(3-0) 
742 Mechanical Properties and Theories of failure 3(3-0) 
744 Network Matrices and Graphs 3(3-0) 
750 Statistical Methods and Quality Control 3(3-0) 
755 Plastic Analysis and Design 3(3-0) 
757 Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys 3(3-0) 
759 Prestressed Concrete Theory and Design 3(3-0) 
764 Rheology 3(3-0) 
767 Structural Dynamics 3(3-0) 
772 Theory and Design of Digital Systems 3(3-0) 
774 Theories of Manufacturing Processes 3(3-0) 

776 Theory of Plasticity 3(3-0) 

777 Thesis Variable (1-6) 

778 Theory of Vibrations 3(3-0) 

779 Advanced Structural Steel Design 3(2-2) 

788 Research Variable (1-3) 

789 Special Topics Variable (1-3) 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 
400-602. Advanced Strength of Materials Credit 3(3 0) 

Stress-strain in relations as applied to statically indeterminate structures, 
bending in curved bars, plates, shells, and beams on elastic foundations; strain 
energy concepts for formulation of flexibility matrix on finite elements; bend- 
ing in beams and plates; introduction to cartesian tensor notation and matrix 
structural analysis. Prerequisite: 440-336 or equivalent. 

440-603. Advanced Thermodynamics Credit 3(3-0) 

Statistical mechanics and microscopic properties from statistical methods. 
Equilibrium information, generalized coordinates, and general variables. Pre- 
requisite: 440-442 or equivalent. 



368 Graduate Program in Engineering 

400-604. Analog Computer Applications Credit 3(2-3) 

An introduction to the analog computer; methods of programming for the 
solution of linear and non-linear differential equations, dynamic response of 
physical systems and simulation of physical systems and phenomena. Prere- 
quisite: 225-300 or equivalent. 

400-606. Automatic Control Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

The automatic control problem; review of operational calculus; state and 
transient solutions of feedback control systems; types of servo-mechanisms 
and control systems; design principles. Prerequisite: 420-501 or equivalent. 

400-612. Communication Systems. Credit 3(3-0) 

The factors affecting the performance of communication systems, such as 
intermodulation noise, thermal noise, bandwidth, and the design of pulse 
modulation systems including delta and pulse code. Communication systems 
using earth satellites are covered in great detail including space communica- 
tion. Prerequisite: 420-565 or equivalent. 

400-614. Communication Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental principles of modulation theory commonly used in the design 
of communication systems; linear modulation systems — amplitude, double and 
single sideband, and vestigial sideband modulation; and non-linear modula- 
tion systems — frequency and phase. Prerequisites: 225-500 and 420-452 or 
equivalent. 

400-622. Electronic Engineering Credit 4(3-3) 

A study of various types of electronic circuits used in engineering practice- 
wave shaping and computing circuits, photosensitive devices and circuits; 
control and switching circuits; modulation and demodulation circuits. Coordi- 
nated laboratory work with industrial applications and special projects. Pre- 
requisite: 420-565 or equivalent. 

400-624. Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

A lecture course in the principles of chain reactors, slowing down of neu- 
trons, neutron diffusion equations, space distribution of neutrons, conditions 
for criticality, reactor dimensions for simple geometries, elementary group 
theories, and time-dependent reactor behavior. Prerequisites: 225-300 and 
440-450 or equivalent. 

400-625. Engineering and Environment. Credit 3(2-3) 

An examination of the engineering role, impact, and demands upon the 
environment relative to its conditions, limitations, chain linkages and effects. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

400-626. Engineering Research Credit Variable 

Special investigation adapted to the special abilities of individual students. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 

400-627. Fundamentals of Logic Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to digital information handling concepts of counting, transfer, 
sequence control, selection, addressing and digital system control. Corequisite: 
420-452 or equivalent. 



Graduate Program in Engineering 369 

400-628. Foundation Engineering Credit 3(2-2) 

Subsoil investigations, analysis and design of foundations and other sub- 
structures. Caisson and cofferdam design and methods of construction — ground 
water control. Prerequisite: 410-564 or equivalent. 

400-632. Information Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Probability theory and its application in the analysis of information trans- 
fer. Special attention is given to information in communications, random sig- 
nals, noise processes, microscopic processes, and macroscopic events. Pre- 
requisite: 420-501 or equivalent. 

400-634. Instrumentation-Theory and Applications Credit 3(3-0) 

Consideration is given to applications of software and hardware techniques 
of instrumentation. Attention is given to treatment of data, errors in measure- 
ments and instruments capabilities, and limitations of instruments as to pre- 
cision and accuracy. Commercial instruments, transducers and their specifi- 
cations are used as models to illustrate basic principles involved. Students are 
encouraged to design instrumentation for measurements of both electrical 
and non-electrical quantities in systems, subsystems and processes. Pre- 
requisite: 420-452 or equivalent. 

400-642. Management, Organization and 

Industrial Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

The production system; fixed and variable cost systems, break-even chart, 
probability distribution and risk analysis. Objectives of production manage- 
ment; models: decision planning, behavioral and control models. Respon- 
sibility, cycle, optimality, effectiveness and efficiency. Management and tech- 
nology or methodology. Industrial economy; value and utility, the economy of 
exchange, prices by supply and demand, quantitative and qualitative knowl- 
edge. Interest formulas, depreciation, pattern for analysis. Prerequisite: 
440-443 or equivalent. 

400-644. Matrix Analysis of Structures Credit 3(2-2) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Review of matrix algebra; statically and kinemati- 
cally, indeterminate structures; introduction to flexibility and stiffness methods; 
applications to beams, plane trusses and plane frames. Prerequisite: 410-457 
or equivalent. 

440-646. Network Synthesis Credit 3(3-0) 

Use of positive real functions and linear graphs in the synthesis of passive 
networks. Investigation of the properties of the driving point and transfer 
functions of passive networks and the synthesis of one- and two-part net- 
works using positive real functions. Linear graphs and topological aspects are 
introduced. Prerequisite: 420-448 or equivalent. 

400-648. Numerical Analysis for Engineers Credit 3(3-0) 

Scientific programming, error analysis, matrix algebra, eigenvalue problems, 
curve-fitting approximations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and in- 
tegration, solutions to simultaneous equations, and numerical solutions of dif- 
ferential equations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



370 Graduate Program in Engineering 

400-650. Operations Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Management decision making, queuing theory, probability and sequences, 
formulation of mathematical models of processes with orientation to optimiz- 
ing by use of digital computers. Prerequisite: 225-224 or equivalent. 

400-652. Plates and Shells Credit 4(2-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Introduction to plane plate theory; membrane 
stresses in shells with axial symmetry; cylindrical shells; applications in the 
design of shell roofs, tanks, pipelines and pressure vessels. Prerequisite: 410- 
455 or equivalent. 

400-654. Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems Credit 3(1-6) 

Special topics and laboratory work of special interest to students in elec- 
tronic networks and communications circuits; most of the work is carried on 
by the project method and emphasizes actual circuit construction. Prerequisite: 
420-452 or equivalent. 

400-655. Professional Development I Credit Variable (1-3) 

Directed self-study in exploring an area both of special interest to the student 
and of mutual interest to Architectural Engineering faculty member(s). 

400-656. Professional Development II Credit Variable (1-3) 

Continuation of 400-655. 

400-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics 
will be selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to 
the programs of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

440-666. Special Projects Credit Variable (1-3) 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student and 
faculty member, who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or 
experimental and encourage independent study. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

400-670. Semiconductor Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the phenomena of solid-state conduction and devices 
using band modeling. Prerequisite: 420-565 or equivalent. 

400-672. Theory of Elasticity Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction; stress; strain; stress-strain relations; energy principles; special 
topics. Prerequisites: 440-336 and 225-300 or equivalent. 

400-674. Transmission of Signals and Power Credit 3(3-0) 

Generalized transmission circuits; transmission line parameters; long dis- 
tance steady state transmission; transients in transmission lines; signal trans- 
mission lines; high frequency lines. Prerequisites: 420-448 and 225-300 or 
equivalent. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Naomi W. Wynn, Dean 

The School of Nursing offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Nursing. The school is organized into lower and upper division de- 
partments. The first two academic years or lower division of the program en- 
compass the core requirements of the university and the foundation courses 
for the major. The upper division or last two academic years is largely devoted 
to Nursing Courses. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The faculty in Nursing subscribe to the beliefs and assumptions related to 
the system of concepts that describe, explain, and predict man's behavior. We 
believe that man is a unique human being with certain basic needs; that he is 
affected, influenced, and changed by his heredity, environment and experi- 
ences; that there are variations in intensity and resources which hamper him 
from time to time in meeting his basic needs. 

The faculty believes that education is a continuous process which provides 
opportunity for the development of the person to his maximum capacity for 
functioning in a dynamic society and that learning is a continuous modification 
of behavior through interaction with the environment. The faculty, with stu- 
dent involvement, assumes responsibility for the planning, interpretation, im- 
plementation, and evaluation of the educational programs. 

Nursing education is the systematic and deliberate preparation of an indi- 
vidual to fulfill the role, function, and responsibility of the professional nurse. 
It provides opportunity for personal growth which helps the learner in human- 
istic and professional endeavors. In addition, nursing education provides learn- 
ing experiences which aid the learner in utilizing the problem solving method 
to meet the present and future nursing needs of society. 

The faculty recognizes that nursing and other health professions are affected 
by the rapid expansion of knowledge and the social factors which influence 
change in the society. We view our responsibility as a collaborating enterprise 
to develop and improve the professional nursing roles of the learner, practition- 
er, collaborator, teacher, and leader. 

The practice of professional nursing offers opportunity to make contributions 
to the welfare of people. As a member of the community health group and a 
leader of the nursing team, the professional nurse must have knowledge of the 
methods of critical inquiry and participate in the development of nursing 
knowledge. 

We believe that the person prepared to render professional nursing practice 
utilizes knowledge and skills in assessing and making judgments to guide the 
nursing action. We further believe that the person prepared in this program 
has the foundation to pursue graduate nursing education. 

The program is planned to prepare a professional nurse who will be able to: 

1. Recognize the basic needs of man and the relationship of these needs to 
behaviors in the promotion of wellness, prevention of illness and self-ful- 
fillment. 



374 The School of Nursing 

2. Utilize biological, sociological, psychological and nursing concepts to 
identify and solve nursing problems in a variety of health care delivery 

settings. 

3. Apply the intellectual skills of critical thinking, independent judgment, 
initiative, self-control and dignity in personal and professional settings. 

4. Practice the professional nurses roles of learner, practitioner, collaborator, 
teacher and leader in the delivery of health care services. 

5. Recognize the need for continuous study and assume responsibility for 
self-fulfillment and professional development. 

Accreditation: 

The program offered by the School of Nursing is accredited by the North 
Carolina Board of Nursing and the National League for Nursing. The School 
of Nursing is an agency member of the National League for Nursing in the 
NLN Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs, the American 
Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Southern Regional Education Board 
Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. 

General Information: 

Nursing Majors are required to purchase uniforms for the Spring Semester 
of the Sophomore Year. The Estimated Cost is ($75.00) seventy-five dollars. 
Beginning in the Sophomore Year, students are required to secure liability in- 
surance through the School of Nursing. 

Learning experiences are provided in a variety of health care agencies. Stu- 
dents will provide their own transportation in Greensboro and Guilford County. 

Students are expected to attend all nursing laboratories with absences per- 
mitted only in unusual circumstances. Make up time lost during clinical nurs- 
ing experiences will be left to the discretion of the faculty. 

A minimum of 126 credit hours is required for graduation with a Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. A minimum of 36 credit hours must be earned at North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University. 

Graduates of the Nursing Program are eligible for admission to the North 
Carolina State Licensure Examination. 

Admission Requirements: 

Applicants who meet the following requirements may be admitted to the 
nursing program for any academic term with a pre-nursing classification: high 
school graduate with sixteen units of credit, cumulative average of "B" or a 
combined scholastic aptitude score of 750 or above. 

Eligibility for admission to the nursing major will depend upon completion 
of the following courses or equivalent courses with a grade point average of 1.8 
on the 4.00 scale: 

Chemistry 104, 105, 114, 115 8 hrs. 

Mathematics 101, 102 6 

General Zoology 160 4 

Ideas & Expressions 100, 101 6 

A student applying for admission to the Nursing Major by transfer must 
meet the same requirements as above. 



The School of Nursing 375 

Registered Nurses will be considered for admission on an individual basis. 
The prerequisite academic courses must be completed before entry into the 
Nursing Major. Validation and/ or special examination for selected nursing 
courses is available. 

Progression: 

In order to enter the nursing major as a sophomore and register for Nursing 
200 and 201, a student must complete 24 semester hours of required courses 
with a grade point average of 1.8 on a 4.00 scale. 

Nursing courses and the following supporting courses must be taken and 
passed with a grade of "C" or above during the sophomore year: Human 
Anatomy and Physiology 461, Microbiology 121, General Psychology 320 and 
Introduction to Human Nutrition 337. 

A grade of "C" or above in Nursing 201 is prerequisite to Nursing 210 and 
211 and is required for enrollment in 300 level nursing courses. 

A grade of "C" or above in all 300 level nursing courses is required for en- 
rollment in the 400 level nursing courses. 

When a student earns a grade of "D" or "F" in a nursing course, it must be 
repeated at the earliest opportunity. When a student earns a second failure in a 
nursing course, he or she will be advised to withdraw from the program. 



CURRICULUM 
Guide For Nursing Majors 

Freshman Year 

Course and Number Credit Hours 

Freshman Mathematics 101 & 102 6 

Ideas and Expressions 100 & 101 6 

General Chemistry 104 & 105 6 

General Chemistry Lab. 114 & 115 2 

General Zoology 160 4 

Human Anatomy & Physiology 461 4 

Nursing Orientation 100 1 

Physical Education 101 & 102 2 

or 

Personal Hygiene 200 _2 

31 

Sophomore Year 

Western Civilization 100 & 101 6 

Humanities 200 & 201 6 

General Psychology 320 3 

Principles of Sociology 100 3 

Nutrition & Dietetics 337 3 

General Microbiology 121 4 

Nursing Competency Laboratory 201 & 211 2 

Nursing Process (Introduction) 210 4 

Historical Perspective of the Nursing Profession 200 _1 

32 



376 The School of Nursing 

Junior Year 

Psychosocial Needs of Children & Adults 300 5 

Pathophysical Needs of Man 310 5 

Nursing Competency Laboratory 301 & 311 2 

Nursing Practice 302 & 312 8 

Speech Fundamentals 250 2 

Abnormal Psychology 434 3 

Electives (Behavioral Sciences) _6 

31 

Senior Year 

The Pathophysical Needs of Man 400 6 

The Sociocultural Needs of Families 410 6 

Nursing Practice 401 & 411 12 

Nursing Seminar 563 2 

Electives _6 

32 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES IN NURSING 

100. Nursing Orientation 1(1-0) 

The aim of the course is to provide a forum for understanding the University 
and its programs. Emphasis is on broadening the students knowledge of nursing 
as a discipline and as a profession. (Open to all potential Nursing Majors) 

200. Historical Perspective of the Nursing Profession 1(1-0) 

The study of Nursing as a profession and how it has developed. Emphasis is 
on the cultural, social, economic, and religious factors which promoted nursing 
to its current status in society. 

201. Nursing Competency Laboratory I 1(0-2) 

The focus is on development of a personal philosophy of nursing practice. A 
limited number of psychomotor skills will be introduced to enhance the stu- 
dents self-reliance in health care settings. 

210. Introduction to the Nursing Process 4(3-3) 

The study of the components of the nursing process with limited experience 
in assessing and planning nursing care. The student acquires knowledge of 
man's basic needs and is expected to identify obvious problems and manifesta- 
tions and plan care in a systematic way for selected patients or clients. One 
three-hour laboratory is scheduled weekly in a Health Care Agency. 

211. Nursing Competency Laboratory II 1(0-2) 

The focus is on development of selected basic nursing skills, selected health 
care terminology, and essential mathematical and measurement skills. 



The School of Nursing 377 

300. The Psychosocial Needs of Children and Adults 5(5-0) 

This course is designed to provide the learner an opportunity to broaden her 
knowledge of the family process. The focus will be on the life cycle of man 
from conception through young adulthood. 

The underlying philosophy permeating the course is that the family experi- 
ences changes that can produce crisis situations. 

The content will be centered on the needs of the family and its members, the 
human development process, and common problems of children and young 
adults. 

301. Nursing Competency Laboratory III 1(0-2) 

The focus is on acquisition of skills pertinent to ministering care to individu- 
als with developmental problems or problems of the expanding family prior to 
practice of the skill in the Health Care Setting. 

302. Nursing Practice I 4(0-12) 

The focus is on the application of the nursing process in identifying needs 
and planning nursing intervention in selected nursing practice settings. Em- 
phasis is on nursing measures to meet the needs of the expanding family in 
normal and crisis situations. Two six-hour or three four-hour practice periods 
are scheduled weekly. 

310. The Pathophysical Needs of Man I 5(5-0) 

The study of the nature of health and illness with emphasis on the biophysi- 
cal and psychological spheres. The emphasis is on understanding normal body 
functions and common interferences caused by illness and disability. 

311. Nursing Competency Laboratory IV 1(0-2) 

The focus is on acquisition of skills pertinent to ministering care to individ- 
uals experiencing interferences in the biological and psychological spheres. 

312. Nursing Practice II 4(0-12) 

The focus is on the application of the nursing process in situations where in- 
terferences occur in the biophysical and psychological spheres. Emphasis is 
placed on the practice of nursing skills requisite to provide nursing care to se- 
lected patients. Two six-hour or three four-hour practice periods are scheduled 
weekly. 

400. The Pathophysical Needs of Man II 6(6-0) 

The focus is on acquisition of knowledge related to complex problems of the 
ill and disabled and theories of nursing management. Content in the course ex- 
plores processes of illness, rehabilitation, adaption and/or restoration to 
health. 

401. Nursing Practice III 6(0-18) 

Focus is on application of the nursing process in meeting the nursing needs 
in complex situations including the nursing leadership role. Opportunity is 
provided for increasing ones competence in the utilization of all phases of the 
nursing process. Emphasis is placed on providing nursing care in situations in- 



378 The School of Nursing 

volving complex interferences in meeting basic needs. Three six-hour practice 
periods or two eight-hour laboratory sessions with sharing post conferences 
per week. 

410. The Sociocultural Needs of Families 6(6-0) 

The sociological, legal and economic aspects of family life as they relate to 
health care delivery. Emphasis will be placed on acquisition of knowledge re- 
lated to persons experiencing crisis that result in behavior aberrations, cur- 
rent theories, concepts, treatment modalities underlying the care of the men- 
tally ill and resources available in the solution of family problems. 

411. Nursing Practice IV 6(0-18) 

Focus is on application of the nursing process in meeting the nursing needs 
of individuals, families, and groups in a variety of Community Mental Health 
Settings. Practice activities include establishing a one to one relationship, uti- 
lization of current treatment modalities to alter maladaptive behavior and nurs- 
ing action designed to assist families in resolving or coping with existing prob- 
lems. Three six-hour practice periods or two eight-hour laboratory sessions 
with sharing post conferences per week. 

563. Nursing Seminar 2(2-0) 

The study of the nursing process in depth through discussion and investiga- 
tive methods. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 









jjl 


^^^<t» «Vfl ^^f i f • 


.v 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Albert W. Spruill, Dean 

Graduate education at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University was authorized by the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. 
The authorization provided for graduate training in agriculture, applied 
science and allied areas of study. An extension of the graduate program, ap- 
proved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, provided for 
enlargement of the program to include teacher education as well as such other 
programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be approved by 
the State Board of Higher Education. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School of North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State 
University offers advanced study for qualified individuals who wish to im- 
prove their competence for careers in professions related to agriculture, ap- 
plied science, education, science research, technology, the humanities and the 
social sciences. Such study of information and techniques is provided through 
courses of study leading to the Master of Science degree and through in- 
stitutes, workshops, and individual courses designed for those who are not 
candidates for a higher degree but who desire advanced work in certain fields 
of study. Second, the Graduate School provides the foundation of knowledge 
and of techniques required for those who wish to continue their education in 
doctoral programs at other institutions. Third, the Graduate School assumes 
the responsibility of stimulating and encouraging scholarly research among 
students and faculty members. 

It is expected that, in the course of their studies, graduate students (1) will 
have acquired special competence in at least one field of knowledge; (2) will 
have developed further their ability to think independently and constructively; 
and (3) will have developed and demonstrated the ability to collect, organize, 
evaluate, and report facts which will enable them to make a contribution in 
their field of study. 

Degrees Granted 

The Graduate School of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University offers the Master of Science in the following fields: 

1. Adult Education 

2. Agricultural Education 

3. Biology 

4. Chemistry 

5. Education 

A. Administration 

B. Curriculum-Instruction Specialist 

C. Elementary Education 

(1) Early Childhood Education (K-3) 

(2) Elementary Education (General) 

(3) Intermediate Education (4-8) 



382 The Graduate School 

D. Postsecondary and College Teaching 

E. Reading 

F. Secondary Education 

(1) Art 

(2) Biology 

(3) Chemistry 

(4) English 

(5) French 

(6) Guidance 

(7) History 

(8) Mathematics 

(9) Music 

(10) Physical Education 

(11) Science 

(12) Social Science 

6. Educational Media 

7. Engineering 

8. English 

A. Afro- American Literature 

9. Food and Nutrition 

10. Industrial Education 

(1) Industrial (Arts) Education 

(2) Trade and Industrial Education 

11. Safety and Driver Education 



ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY 

All applicants for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's degree 
from a four-year college. Application forms may be obtained from the office 
of the Graduate School and must be returned to that office with two transcripts 
of previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Processing of applications 
cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all supporting docu- 
ments, in the Graduate Office at least fifteen days before a registration period. 
Applicants may be admitted to graduate studies unconditionally, provisionally, 
or as special students. 

Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to 
graduate studies, an applicant must have earned an over-all average of 2.6 
on a 4 point system (or 1.6 on a 3 point system) in his undergraduate studies. 
In addition, a student seeking a degree in Agricultural Education, Industrial 
Education, or Secondary Education must posses, or be qualified to posses, a 
Class A Teaching Certificate in the area in which he wishes to concentrate 



The Graduate School 383 

his graduate studies. A student seeking a degree with concentration in Adminis- 
tration and Supervision, Elementary Education, or Guidance must possess, or 
be qualilied to possess a Class A Teacher Certificate. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies 
on a provisional basis if (1) he earned his baccalaureate degree from a non- 
credited institution or (2) the record of his undergraduate preparation reveals 
deficiencies that can be removed near the beginning of his graduate study. 
A student admitted provisionally may be required to pass examinations to 
demonstrate his knowledge in specified areas, to take special undergraduate 
courses to improve his background, or to demonstrate his competence for 
graduate work by earning no grades below "B" in his first nine hours of 
graduate work at this institution. 

Special Students. Students not seeking a graduate degree at A. and T. 
State University may be admitted in order to take courses for self-improve- 
ment or for renewal of teaching certificates. If a student subsequently wishes 
to pursue a degree program, he must request an evaluation of his record. The 
Graduate School reserves the right to refuse to accept as credit for a degree 
program hours which the candidate earned while enrolled as a special stu- 
dent; in no circumstances may the student apply towards a degree program 
more than twelve semester hours earned as a special student. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree. Admission to graduate studies 
does not guarantee admission to candidacy for a degree. In order to be quali- 
fied as a candidate for a degree, a student must have a minimum over-all 
average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of graduate work at the Univer- 
sity, must have removed all deficiencies resulting from undergraduate pre- 
paration, and must have passed the Qualifying Essay. Some departments re- 
quire additional qualifying examinations. For details, see the Graduate 
School Bulletin. 

Credit Requirements. The minimum course requirements for a graduate 
degree are thirty semester hours for students in thesis programs and non- 
thesis programs. It is expected that a student can complete a program by 
studying full-time for an academic year and a summer or by studying full-time 
during four nine-week summer sessions. A graduate student normally carries 
twelve to fifteen semester hours each semester of an academic year. If he is 
teaching full-time, he may not pursue more than six semester hours during 
the academic year. During the summer he may not earn more than one hour of 
credit for each week of residence. A student who does not complete his degree 
within six successive calendar years may lose credit for hours earned more 
than six years prior to his application for graduation. 

Other Requirements. All students must pass a final comprehensive ex- 
amination. 

Fees. Fees for graduate students are listed in General Information section 
of this catalogue. 

Financial Assistants hips. A limited number of assistantships are avail- 
able. These positions may require teaching, laboratory supervision, research, 
or general assistance to a department or to a faculty member. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 

General requirements for the Master's degree, curricula, course descrip- 
tions, and other information about graduate study will be found in the Grad- 
uate School Bulletin, which may be obtained from the Graduate Office. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY 
SCIENCE AND AEROSPACE 
STUDIES 







DEPARTMENTS OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND 
AEROSPACE STUDIES 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at A&T State University con- 
sists of those students enrolled for training in the Department of Military 
Science or in the Department of Aerospace Studies. These Departments are 
integral academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. The 
Senior Army Officer and Senior Air Force Officer assigned to the University 
are designated as Professor of Military Science (PMS) and Professor of Aero- 
space Studies (PAS), respectively. These senior officers are responsible to the 
Department of Defense and the Institutional Coordinator of Military Training 
for conducting the training and academic programs. Army officers who are 
assigned to the University as ROTC Instructors are designated Assistant 
Professors of Military Science; Air Force officers, as Assistant Professors of 
Aerospace Studies. Noncommissioned officers of the Army are assigned as 
Assistant Instructors and administrative personnel. Noncommissioned officers 
of the Air Force are assigned as Specialists, Technicians, and Supervisors in 
the areas of Administration, Education, Personnel and Supply. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

Lt. Colonel John Jones 
Professor of Military Science 

The general purpose of the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 
program at this institution is to procure and produce junior officers, who 
through education, attitude, and inherent qualities are suitable for con- 
tinued development as officers in the United States Army. 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the ROTC program are: 

1. To attract, motivate, and prepare selected students with potential to 
serve as commissioned officers in the Regular Army or US Army Re- 
serve. 

2. To provide an understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles 
of military art and science. 

3. To develop the ability to evaluate situations, to make decisions, to 
understand people, and practice those attributes considered to be 
essential in a leader. 

4. To develop a basic understanding of associated professional knowl- 
edge, a strong sense of personal integrity, honor and individual respon- 
sibility. 

5. To develop an appreciation of the requirements for national security. 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

Programs of instruction for the Army ROTC include a four year program 
and a two year program. The four year program consists of a two year basic 
course, a two year advanced course and the Advanced ROTC Summer Camp. 
The two year program includes a Basic ROTC Summer Camp, a two year 
advanced course and the Advanced ROTC Summer Camp. 



388 Department of Military Science 

BASIC COURSE: The basic course 15 elective for all physically fit male 
and female students who are not less than 14 years of age and it is normally 
taken during the freshman and sophomore years. The purpose of this instruc- 
tion is to introduce the student to basic military subjects: Military History; 
familiarization with basic weapons, (female students do not have to take 
this phase of training) equipment and techniques; military organization and 
functions; and the techniques of leadership and command. It is from the men 
and women who successfully complete this instruction that the best quali- 
fied are selected for the Advanced Course which leads to an Officer's com- 
mission. 

ADVANCED COURSE: The advance course is designed to produce officers 
for the Army of the United States, both the active Army and the Reserve. 
Admission to the Advanced Course is on a best qualified basis. Successful 
completion of the Advanced Course and completion of academic degree re- 
quirements qualified the student or a commission as a Second Lieutenant 
in one of the following branches of the United States Army Reserve: Adjutant 
General Corps, Armor, Infantry, Military Intelligence and Security, Field 
Artillery, Air Defense Artillery, Chemical Corps, Military Police Corps, Ordi- 
nance Corps and Quartermaster Corps, Signal Corps, Medical Service Corps. 

Flight instruction is offered to students, male and female, in the second 
year of the Advanced Course. Under this program, the Army will pay for 
flight training for selected qualified ROTC students. To participate, students 
must have an aptitude for flying, and meet the required physical qualifica- 
tions for the program. 

Flight training under the ROTC program is given at an airfield near the 
institution by a civilian flying school which has the approval of the Federal 
Aviation Agency, Department of the Army, and the University. 

Students who successfully complete the program of instruction may quali- 
fy to take the FAA examination for a -private pilot's license. 

All textbooks, flight clothing and equipment required for the program are 
furnished at no cost to the student. Transportation between the University 
and airfield is also provided. 

TWO YEAR PROGRAM: This program is designed for Junior College stu- 
dents or sophomores at four year institutions who have not taken ROTC. A 
basic six-week summer training period after the sophomore year takes the 
place of the basic course required fo students in the traditional foru year 
program. When a student with two years of college has successfully com- 
pleted the basic summer training, he is eligible for the Advanced ROTC 
course in his junior and senior years. The Advanced Course, which leads to 
an Officer's commission is the same for students in either the four year 
program or the two year program. 

Requirements for enrollment in Basic ROTC: 

1. Be a citizen of the United States 

2. Be not less than 14 years of age 

3. Be physically qualified under standards prescribed by the Department 
of Army 

4. Be a regularly enrolled student of the University 

5. Be morally qualified as prescribed by the Department of the Army. 



Department of Military Science 389 

6. Be eligible to qualify for appointment as Second Lieutenant prior to 
reaching 28 years of age 

7. Must sign a loyalty oath for ROTC students 

Requirements for enrollment in Advance ROTC: 

1. Be a citizen of the United States 

2. Be selected by the PMS and the President of the University 

3. Enlist in a Reserve Component. Parents or guardians consent is nec- 
essary if under age 21. 

4. Must sign a contract. Parents or guardians consent is necessary if the 
applicant is under 21 years of age. 

5. Agree to accept a commission if offered and serve for the period pre- 
scribed. 

6. Successfully complete the first two years of a four year course; or 
complete a summer camp of at least six weeks duration; or receive credit 
in lieu of as a result of previous military service. 

7. Must satisfactorily comply with loyalty requirements 

8. Meet requirements prescribed by the Department of the Army 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A student may be allowed transfer credit for military training pursued at 
the service academies or other institutions with ROTC units. Record of a 
student's prior military training will be obtained from the institution con- 
cerned. A student who has served at least six months of active duty service, 
or at least one year active duty service in any branch of the Armed Forces 
may receive credit for part of the basic course, or credit for the entire basic 
course, respectively. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE DEFERMENTS 

Basic Army ROTC cadet (freshmen and sophomores) are provided draft 
deferments through the Army ROTC Department. Under present law, mili- 
tary deferment precludes the student from being drafted as long as he meets 
the requirement of the University and the ROTC program. 

OBLIGATION AFTER COMMISSION 

The student who receives a commission may be required to serve on active 
duty for three (3) years and thereafter three (3) years in a reserve status. Se- 
lected officers are offered the opportunity to serve their military obligation 
through participation in the active reserve in conjunction with a three to six 
(3-6) month period of Active Duty for Training (ADT). The recipient of a Reg- 
ular Army Commission serves a minimum of three (3) years on active duty and 
three (3) years in a reserve status. 

The Officer who elects to pursue a civilian career after his active service, has 
many opportunities to continue military education while completing his obli- 
gation in a reserve status. Service schools are open to the reservist at all stages 
of his career. Selected individuals may go to civilian school (i.e., med, law, 
graduate) at the expense of the Armed Forces while in active duty, service, if so 
a further obligation is incurred. 



390 Department of Military Science 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, textbooks, and equipment are provided the student at govern- 
ment expense. A uniform deposit of ten ($10.00) dollars is required of all 
students at time of registration. The deposit is refunded when complete uni- 
forms are returned. The student is responsible for the care, safeguarding, and 
cleaning of property issued to him. He is financially responsible for the loss, 
excessive wear, breakage due to carelessness, or unauthorized use of cloth- 
ing and equipment. 

All ROTC property must be returned to the Military Property Custodian at 
the end of the school year or when the student withdraws from the program. 

CADET WELFARE FUND 

All Army ROTC cadets are automatically members of the Cadet Welfare 
Fund. A membership fee of five ($5.00) dollars is charged payable at initial 
registration each year to Army ROTC faculty and staff. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students enrolled in the Advanced Course are paid subsistence pay (non- 
taxable) at the rate of $100.00 per month ($8.50 per hour of class). 

Students attending the Basic ROTC Summer Camp and the Advanced 
ROTC Summer Camp are paid at the rates established by the Secretary of the 
Army. One, two, three, and four year Army ROTC scholarships are available 
for selected students. Details on scholarships may be obtained from the De- 
partment of Military Science, NC A&T State University. All scholarship 
students receive $100.00 per month subsistence pay. The Army pays tuition, 
laboratory fees and book costs for scholarship students. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE ARMY ROTC 

The Army ROTC is organized into an Army ROTC Cadet Battalion. The 
Battalion consist of a Headquarters Detachment, Company A and Company 
B. The Drill Team and Bushmasters are part of Company B. These units re- 
ceive additional training and perform as the honor guard for special cere- 
monies both on and off campus. 

DISTINGUISHED MILITARY GRADUATE (DMG) PROGRAM 

This is a competitive program which permits outstanding ROTC students 
to apply for Regular Army commissions. At the end of the junior year and 
prior to the Advanced Course summer camp, selected ROTC cadets are iden- 
tified as potential Distinguished Military Students (DMS). A student who main- 
tains the same high standards throughout summer camp and is subsequently 
designated a DMG may apply for a Regular Army Commission. 

ENROLLMENT IN ROTC 

To remain within the ROTC program, the student must be enrolled as a 
full time student here at the University. Should difficulties be encountered and 
the student falls below a 12 hours semester load, the military advisor must 
be notified prior to dropping any course. Those students not carrying the 
minimum load of 12 hours, may be dropped from the program. 



Department of Military Science 391 

WOMEN IN ROTC 

Army ROTC enrolls female students in the programs. Specific information 
to females enrolling in ROTC is provided as follows: 

a. Branch Selection: 

1. It is Army policy to assign each graduating female to a branch after 
considering her personal preference, academic major, physical qualifica- 
tions, ROTC training and demonstrated abilities, so far as possible. Women 
may not be assigned to Infantry Armor, or Field Artillery. Women are not 
allowed to participate in Airborne or Ranger Training but during the senior 
year of ROTC, women may enroll in the Flight Instruction Program. 

2. Women are encouraged to take math courses or to obtain a "good" 
background in statistical analysis, which prepares them for a variety of 
branches (i.e., Air Defense Artillery, Signal Corps, Finance Corps, etc.) 

3. Women who desire to be commissioned in the Army Nurse Corps should 
take the Basic ROTC Courses. 

b. Enrollment Age: 

1. Female enrollees must have attained 17 years of age. If under 21, they 
must obtain parental consent unless their state of legal domicile has granted 
women legal majority at an earlier age. Women must be under 28 years of 
age to be commissioned through the ROTC program. 

c. Scholarships: 

1. Same as the information listed under financial aid section. 

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT: AN ROTC REQUIREMENT 

ROTC students are required to enroll in an academic enrichment course 
during each year enrolled within the program. These enrichment courses 
(electives) are a prerequisite before a commission can be offered. 

It is important to understand that these academic enrichment courses are 
"in addition to those electives required in the students academic major." 

Deviations from this requirement are not permitted. Academic enrichment 
courses selected, must be approved by the students' Military Advisor. Ad- 
herence to the above procedure and requirement will be closely monitored. 

Requirements for academic enrichment are as listed below: 

MS I Two (2) semester hours per year 
MS II Two (2) semester hours per year 
MS III Three (3) semester hours p'er year 
MS IV Three (3) semester hours per year 

GRADUATE STUDIES 

An ROTC graduate who receives a reserve commission may delay his active 
military service to pursue a full time course of instruction leading to an ad- 
vance degree. The top five (5) per cent of all non-scholarship Distinguished 
Military Graduates selected for Regular Army may elect, if qualified, to attend 
Graduate School for a Master Degree in the field of study for which the 
Army has a valid requirement. Officers in this category will be on active duty 
with full pay and allowances. 



392 Department of Military Science 

ROTC graduates are assigned positions of responsibility which take full 
advantage of their college education and leadership training. Officers, 
especially those who have background in scientific and technical fields, may 
qualify for graduate study at government expense after they enter active 
service. 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE PERSHING RIFLES 

Founded in 1884, by General of the Army, John J. Pershing the society is 
a military social fraternity committed to the highest ideals of excellence in 
leadership and manhood. 

DRILL TEAM 

All basic course students are eligible to compete for participation on the 
ROTC Drill Team. A unit whose specialities are tricks and fancy drills. The 
Drill Team conducts demonstrations both on and off the campus throughout 
the school year. 

BUSHMASTERS 

The Bushmasters (Counterinsurgency Unit) is an elite group of Army 
ROTC Cadets, organized to provide training in counterinsurgency operations. 
This unit consist of all voluntary cadets. Members of this unit must maintain 
at least a 2.00 grade point average each semester. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF THE US ARMY (AUSA) 

The Association of the US Army (AUSA) is a non-profit, educational or- 
ganization whose members, civilian and military, firmly believe that a 
thoroughly professional Army, supported by the American people, is essential 
to our national defense. The organization supports every man or woman who 
wears the Army green — Active, Reserve or National Guard. 

SCABBARD AND BLADE 

The National Society of Scabbard and Blade was founded 1904. The pri- 
mary purpose of Scabbard and Blade is to raise the standard of military edu- 
cation in American colleges and universities; to unite in closer relationship 
their military departments; to encourage the essential qualities of good and 
efficient officers; and disseminate knowledge of military education to the 
students and people of the country — acquaint the people with our national 
defense needs. 

COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

FALL SEMESTER 

*101. Introduction of the Citizen/Soldier Credit 1(1-1) 

An introduction to the mission, organization, and history of ROTC; Military 
and civilian obligation in relation to National Security; Individual Arms and 
Marksmanship Techniques; Emergency Medical Treatment. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*102. Introduction to United States Military Forces in Support of National 
Defense Credit 1(1-1) 

A discussion of the mission and responsibilities of the United States Mili- 
tary Forces in support of National Security with emphasis on the role of the 
individual participating citizen. 



Department of Military Science 393 

FALL SEMESTER 

201. Branches of the Army and Leadership Principles 

An orientation on each branch of the Army to acquaint students with the job 
areas available to the ROTC graduate. Additionally an appreciation is devel- 
oped for the applicability of leadership principles, traits, and techniques in all 
job areas. 

*202. Orienteering and Leadership Development Credit 1(1-1) 

A detailed study of orienteering to include basic fundamentals of map 
reading, grid systems, scale and distance, elevation and relief, military sym- 
bols, direction and location, and utilization of the declination diagram. Em- 
phasis will also be placed on selected enrichment subjects and evaluation of 
leadership development and a basic introduction to military term theory. 

FALL SEMESTER 

*301. Introduction to Military Team Theory Credit 2(2-2) 

Fundamentals to the offensive and defensive tactics. Introduction to small 
unit communication systems. Internal defense operations. The role of each 
branch of the Army. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*302. Leadership Training Credit 2(2-2) 

Special emphasis on the psychological, physiological, and sociological fac- 
tor's which affect human behavior. Military teaching principles and how 
they affect the student. Presummer Camp training. 

FALL SEMESTER 

*401. Seminars in leadership Management and Professional Development 
Credit 2(2-2) 

The relationship between commander and staff, utilization and employment 
of military intelligence principles, introduction to unit management and ad- 
ministration, introduction to military law; seminar on service life and career 
planning for commissioned officers. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*402. Advance Military Team Theory and Active Duty Credit 2(2-2) 

Orientation 

A study of world change and military implications. A detailed study of Army 
and special type units. Introduction to various Army installations within the 
United States and abroad. 



394 Department of Aerospace Studies 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES 

Lt. Colonel Charles E. Summers 
Professor of Aerospace Studies 

The United States Air Force maintains a permanent Air Force Reserve Of- 
ficers Training Corps at this institution for the purpose of conducting leader- 
ship training, military training, and flight training. The specific objective is to 
conduct a modern academic program keyed to the development of the Pro- 
fessional Officer. This program is offered in two divisions. The lower division 
for Freshmen and Sophomores is termed the General Military Course. The 
upper division, established as the Professional Officer Course, is designed 
to continue the training of Juniors and Seniors so as to provide a complete 
four-year officer preparatory program. The entire Aerospace Studies cur- 
riculum is designed to commission quality young men and women who are 
not only educated in the academics of their university, but who have a com- 
petency in certain military skills, and a strong motivation for active duty and 
an Air Force Career. 

PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

GENERAL MILITARY COURSE(GMC). This course is open to freshmen 
and sophomores and is designed to provide the student with a basic founda- 
tion in the history and development of air power and the organization and 
mission of the U.S. Air Force. Those students who successfully complete this 
course are eligible to attend Field Training and to enroll in the Professional 
Officer Course (discussed below). 

FIELD TRAINING. AFROTC Field Training is offered during the summer 
months at selected Air Force bases throughout the United States. Students in 
the four-year program participate in four weeks of Field Training during the 
summer, usually between their sophomore and junior year. The major areas of 
study in the four-week Field Training program include junior officer train- 
ing, aircraft and aircrew orientation, career orientation, survival training, 
base functions and Air Force environment, and physical training. 

Students applying for entry into the two-year program must successfully 
complete six weeks of Field Training prior to enrollment in AFROTC. Ap- 
plication for the two year program must be made during the Fall (or early 
Spring) Semester of the sophomore year. The major areas of study included 
in the six-week Field Training program are essentially the same as those 
conducted at four-week Field Training and in the General Military Course, 
including Leadership Laboratory. 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICER COURSE (POC). Entry into the Professional 
Officer Course is competitive in nature. Applicants must attain a satisfactory 
result on the Air Force Officers Qualifying Test, as well as an Air Force med- 
ical examination, and be selected by an interview board of Air Force officers. 
The first year of the POC explores the role of the professional officer in 
modern society and deals with the formulation and implementation of 
American defense policy. The final year is a study of management, leader- 
ship, and the military law system. 

LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. Leadership Laboratory is taken an average 
of one hour per week throughout the student's four years of enrollment in 
AFROTC. Two-year program students participate while in the Professional 



Department of Aerospace Studies 395 

Officer Course. Instruction is conducted within the framework of an or- 
ganized cadet corps with a progression of experiences designed to develop 
each student's leadership potential. Leadership Laboratory involves a study 
of Air Force customs and courtesies; drill and ceremonies; career opportunities 
in the Air Force; and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. Students 
develop their leadership potential in a practical, supervised laboratory, which 
typically includes field trips to Air Force installations throughout the U.S. 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

All regularly enrolled cadets of the Air Force ROTC are furnished cost- 
free, Air Force ROTC uniforms, equipment, and textbooks. A deposit of ten 
dollars ($10.00) is required of all cadets at the time of registration as security 
for clothing and equipment. This fee will be refunded upon return of all 
items issued. Each cadet is responsible for the maintenance and security of 
property. All property issued, must be returned at the end of the normal 
school year or upon withdrawal from school. 



TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transfer credit is permitted cadets entering the Air Force ROTC, from 
another advanced ROTC program (Air Force, Army or Navy), at any col- 
lege, university or academy. 



FINANCIAL AID 

A subsistance fee of $100.00 per month is paid advanced cadets (Juniors 
and seniors) during the entire normal academic year while a member of the 
Air Force ROTC. 

Scholarships may be granted for periods of two, three and four years. 
Details on scholarships will be published by the Department of the Air Force 
and by the Department of Aerospace Studies, NC A&T State University. All 
students on scholarship receive $100.00 per month tax-free allowance and the 
Air Force pays tuition, laboratory fees and book costs. 

STRUCTURE OF THE CADET GROUP 

The Air Force ROTC Cadet Group, commanded by a Cadet Lieutenant 
Colonel, consists of three squadrons (nine flights). Within the structure of 
this group are such special functions as: the Drill Team, the elite Arnold Air 
Society and Angel Flight. 

SPECIAL HONORS 

Outstanding performance in the Air Force ROTC Training Program, on the 
part of certain selected cadets can bestow on them the honor of Distinguished 
Graduate. Other honors are the Commandant's Award, the Vice-Comman- 
dant's Award. 

CADET WELFARE FUND 

All AFROTC Cadets are members of the Cadet Welfare Fund. A member- 
ship fee of $5.00 is charged payable at initial registration each year. These fees 
are used to defray expenses for various cadet social activities. 



396 Department of Aerospace Studies 

AIR FORCE ROTC OFFICERS CLUB 

The Cadet Officers Club provides advanced cadets with an opportunity to 
demonstrate organizational leadership ability and to promote social and cul- 
tural activities. Each advanced (POC) cadet is requested to become a mem- 
ber of the club and is obligated to pay club dues. The amount of the dues will 
be determined by club members each school year. 



COURSES IN AEROSPACE STUDIES 
General Military Course (Basic) 
AEROSPACE STUDIES (Courses for Freshmen) 

101. The U.S. Air Force Today I Credit 1(1-0) 
A study of the doctrine, mission, and organization of the United States Air 

Force; U.S. Strategic offensive and defensive forces; their mission and func- 
tions; employment of nuclear weapons. (Fall Semester) 

102. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 101. 

103. The U.S. Air Force Today II Credit 1(1-0) 
A study of aerospace defense; missile defense; U.S. general purpose and 

aerospace support forces; the mission, resource, and operation of tactical air 
forces, with special attention to limited war; review of Army, Navy, and 
Marine general purpose forces. (Spring Semester) 

104. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 103. 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (Course for Sophomores) 

201. The Development of Air Power I. Credit 1(1-0) 
An introduction to the study of Air Power. The course is developed from a 

historical perspective starting before the Wright Brothers and continuing 
through World War II. The text U.S. Air Power: Ascension to Prominence 
describe the development of air power from Kitty Hawk through WW II. (Fall 
Semester) 

202. Leadership Laboratory. Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 201. 

203. The Development of Air Power II. Credit 1(1-0) 
A study of a quarter century of Air Power begins with the Berlin Airlift and 

includes major events through Vietnam in 1971. Chapters in the text, A Quarter 
Century of Air Power, were written by various military and civilian Air 
Force historians specifically for this course. (Spring Semester) 

204. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 203. 



Department of Aerospace Studies 397 

Professional Officer Course (Advanced) 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (Courses for Juniors) 

401. Nat. Security Forces In Contemporary Am. Society I. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course is conceptually focused on the Armed Forces as an integral ele- 
ment of society with emphasis on the broad range of American Civil-Military 
relations and the environmental context in which U.S. defense policy is for- 
mulated and implemented. The student will be expected to prepare individual 
and group presentations for the class, write reports, and otherwise participate 
in group discussions, seminars, and conferences. (Fall Semester) 

402. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 401. 

403. Nat. Security Forces In Contemporary Am. Society II. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course is a continuation of AS 401. The student will be expected to use 

the analytical skills gained in AS 401 to predict the outcome of situations in 
the world. Special themes include: societal attitudes towards the military; the 
role of the professional military leader — manager in a democratic society, the 
fundamental values and socialization processes associated with the Armed 
Services; the requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; 
political, economic and social constraints on the national defense structure. 
The student will be aware of the impact of technological and international 
development of strategic preparedness. (Spring Semester) 

404. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(01-) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 403. 



AEROSPACE STUDIES (Course for Seniors) 

501. The Professional Officer I. Credit 3(3-0) 
An integrated management course emphasizing the individual as a manager 

in an Air Force environment. Individual motivation and behavioral processes, 
communication, and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for 
the development of the junior officer's professional skills. The basic managerial 
processes involving decision-making, planning, organizing, and controlling 
are emphasized. (Fall Semester) 

502. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 502. 

503. The Professional Officer II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of leadership theory and its application to real-world problems. 

Traces the development of leadership theory and emphasizes the leadership 
role of Air Force officers. Military justice and administrative law are dis- 
cussed within the context of the military organization. (Spring Semester) 

504. Leadership Laboratory Credit 0(0-1) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A. S. 503. 



398 Department of Aerospace Studies 

505. Flight Training— Ground School Credit 3(3-0) 
Academic instruction devoted to Federal Aviation Regulations, Meteorology, 

Navigation, Computers, and Radio Navigation. (Required of all Pilot Train- 
ees, open to all other students). 

506. Flight Training— Flying Credit 3(3-0) 
Flight instruction provided to teach the fundamentals to take-offs, landings, 

stalls, steep turns, traffic patterns, air discipline, basic flight maneuvers, 
emergency procedures and cross-country flights. (Required for all Pilot Trainees. 
Only advanced POC Cadet Pilot Trainees will be offered Flying training at 
afrotc expense.) 



Officers of Instruction 399 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Elias G. Abu-Sabu (PE) Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.M.E., American University of Beirut; M.S.C.E., Ph.D., Virginia Polytech- 
nical Institute. 

Stuart Ahrens Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Beloitt College; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Wyoming. 

Harrison Ola Akingbade Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Cuttington College; M.A., Goddard College. 

Melvin T. Alexander Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Sandra C. Alexander Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Winser E. Alexander . . Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering 

and Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
New Mexico. 

Dorothy Jean Alston Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., North Carolina Central University; Ed.D., 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

*Bernadette Anderson Instructor of Speech 

B.A., A.M., University of Illinois. 

Lee D. Andrews Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., N.C. A. and T. State University; J.D., Howard University; LLM, George 
Washington University. 

Brigitte Edith Archibald Assistant Professor of German 

B.A., The King's College; M.A., Middlebury College at Mainz, Germany; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

J. Niel Armstrong Director of Summer School and Associate 

Professor of Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

Margaret Artis Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S. North Carolina College; M.E. Pennsylvania State College. 

Rudolph D. Artis Director of Registration and Records; 

Professor of Sociology 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.C., Ed.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas Avery Assistant Professor of Electrical Technology 

Certificate, Southeastern Signal Institute; B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., 
A. and T. College. 

Charles Bailey Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., J. C. Smith University; M.S., N.C. A. and T. State University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Connecticut. 

Willie H. Bailey . . Acting Chairman, Department of Business Administration 

and Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Tougaloo College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

*Francis Baird Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.F.A., The University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. 

*On leave. 



400 Officers of Instruction 

Jimmie I. Barber Assistant Professor of Psychology and Guidance 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Isaac Barnett Professor of Safety and Driver Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College; Ed.D., Michigan State University. 

Arthur P. Bell Chairman, Department of Agricultural Education 

and Professor of Agricultural Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Edwin Bell Director of Planning/ PME (Planning, Management and 

Evaluation) and Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Bowdoin College; M.A., Boston College. 

Frank Bell Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Joseph Bennett Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., St. Augustine's College; M.A., New York University. 

Richard Bennett, Jr Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Morehouse College; Ph.D., The University of California at Santa 
Barbara. 

Brian Benson Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Guilford College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

Marion R. Blair Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity. 

W. Archie Blount Director of Institutional Research and 

Professor of Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Lucy Bolden Instructor of English 

B.A., Bennett College; M.S., A. and T. State University. 

Mitzi D. Bond Instructor of English 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

Mildred Bonner Associate Professor of Psychology and Guidance 

R.N., Meharry Medical College; B.S., M.S., Tennessee A. and I. State Uni- 
versity. 

Evans Booker Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Stephen G. Boozer Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies 

B.S., Auburn University, M.S., Central Michigan University. 

Bolinda N. Borah Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Cotton College, India; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University. 

Botros M. Botros, P.E Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Alexandria University, United Arab Republic; M.Eng'g., Ph.D., 
Sheffield University. 

Ernest M. Bradford Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Morehouse College; B.D., Morehouse College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Nebraska. 

Thelma Bradford Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Tougaloo College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Pearl G. Bradley Professor of Speech 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 



Officers of Instruction 401 

Charles C. Brewer Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Northern Illinois University; J.D., University of Illinois. 

Talmage Brewer Acting Chairman, Department of Animal Science 

and Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., Prairie View College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Jean M. Bright Associate Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Nathan Brown Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Joseph Allen Buggs Instructor of Physical Education and 

Assistant Football Coach 
B.S., Elizabeth City State University; M.A., Hampton Institute. 

Sampson Buie Instructor of Adult Education and Community Services 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Dorothy Cameron Assistant Professor of Business Education 

and Office Administration 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Robert J. Cannon . . . Acting Chairman, Department of History and Associate 

Professor of History 
B.A., Grambling College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Walter Carlson Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Mus., University of Michigan. 

Ethbert Carr Assistant Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., Ohio State University. 

Sheila M. Carver Instructor of Music 

B.M., Eastern New Mexico University; M.F.A., University of Iowa. 

Suresh Chandra Dean, School of Engineering and Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering 
B.Sc, Allahabad University; B.Sc, Banaras Hindu University; M.Ch.E., 
University of Louisville; Ph.D., Colorado State University. 

David Chen Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., New Mexico State University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Gwendolyn Cherry Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Arlington W. Chisman Acting Chairman, Industrial Technology and 

Associate Professor 
B.S., Virginia State College; M.Ed., Virginia State College; Ph.D., The Ohio 
State University. 

Pill Jay Cho Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.A., Pusan National University; M.A., Ktungpook National University; 
M.S., The University of Texas. 

Naiter Chopra Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc, Hons., M.Sc. Hons., University of Punjab; Ph.D., University of Dublin. 

Elizabeth Clark Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

William B. Clark Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 



402 Officers of Instruction 

Catherine Clifton Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Arizona State University. 

William H. Cole Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Delaware State College; MBA, Babson College. 

Gerry M. Coleman Instructor of Speech 

B.A., South Carolina State College; M.A., University of Illinois. 

Basil Coley Professor of Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

James Colston .... Interim Acting Chairman Administrative and Supervisor 

Professor of Postsecondary Education 
B.S., Morehouse College; MA. Atlanta University; Ed.D., New York Uni- 
versity. 

Ernestine Compton Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Central State College; Ed.M., Temple University. 

Irene Cook Assistant Professor of Social Service 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; A.M., University of Chicago. 

*EHzabeth Cooper Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., Bellevue Hospital; B.S.N. , North Carolina Central University; M.S.N., 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Marquis Cousins Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

William J. Craft Assistant Dean, School of Engineering and Associate 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.C., Ph.D., Clemson University. 

Quiester Craig Dean, School of Business and Economics and 

Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Morehouse College; M.B.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Missouri Uni- 
versity. 

John Crawford Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Col- 
orado. 

Bynum C. Crews Associate Professor, Librarian 

A.B., Shaw University; M.L.S., North Carolina College. 

Amarendranath Datta Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., National Council on Education; M.S., Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina. 

Leslie Davis Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies 

B.S., Syracuse University, M.S., Southern Illinois University. 

Rubye Davis Assistant Professor of Business Education and 

Office Administration 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Robert Davis Assistant Professor of Sociology /Social Service 

B.A., Southern University; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Washington 
State University. 

James Dawkins Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Charles C. Dean Associate Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; B.L.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., New York 

University. 

*On leave. 



Officers of Instruction 403 

William Delauder Chairman, Department of Chemistry and 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Morgan State College; Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

Maria Diaz Associate Professor of Physics 

Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana. 

Octavio Diaz Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana. 

Mabel Dillard Professor of English 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio University. 

Katie Dorsett Associate Professor of Business Education 

B.S., Alcorn College; M.S., Indiana University; Ed.D., The University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Leonard Dudka Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., California State Polytechnic College; Ph.D., University of Illi- 
nois-Urbana. 

Leslie M. Dula Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies 

B.S., N.C. A. and T. State University; M.S., University of Arkansas. 

Samuel Dunn Chairman and Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Oregon 
State College. 

Valeria D. Easterling Instructor of Business Administration 

B.A., Hampton Institute; M.S., Howard University. 

Dorothy Eller Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., M.A., Boston University. 

Willie T. Ellis Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

and Professor of Agridultural Education 
B.S., M.S., A. and T. College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Charles L. Evans Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; MBA, Syracuse University. 

Sidney H. Evans Professor and Chairman, Department of Economics 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

George Filatovs Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Washington University at St. Louis; Ph.D., University of Missouri at 
Rolla. 

*Charley Flint Instructor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; A.M., Rutgers, The State 
University. 

James Walter Forster Assistant Professor of Speech and Technical 

Director of the University Theatre 
B.F.A., M.F.A., Drake University. 

Charles Fountain Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Hermon Fox (PE) Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Algeania W. Freeman . . . Chairperson, Department of Speech Communication 

and Theater Arts and Assistant Professor 
B.S., Fayetteville State University; M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., 
The Ohio State University. 

*On leave. 



404 Officers of Instruction 

George C. Gail Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Minnesota. 

Seetha Ganapathy Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Mysore; Ph.D., University of Bombay. 

Tiney Garrison Instructor of Nursing 

R.N., B.S., A. and T. College. 

Hubert Gaskin Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Warmoth T. Gibbs Associate Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Jason Gilchrist Professor and Chairman, Department of Physics 

B.S., Norfolk State College; M.S., Ph.D., Howard University. 

Valerie Jean Goins Instructor of Speech 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

William Goode Dean of Student Affairs for Student Management and 

Human Relations and Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Knoxville College. 

Henry Goodman Associate Professor of Adult Education 

B.S., M.Ed., East Carolina University; Ed.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Alfonso E. Gore Professor of Education 

B.S., Bluefield State College; A.M., West Virginia University; C.A.G.S., 
Ed.D., Boston University. 

Ruth M. Gore Director of Academic Advising and Associate Professor 

of Psychology and Guidance 
B.S., Livingstone; M.S., West Virginia University. 

J. W. R. Grandy Instructor of Plant Science 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Anne C. Graves Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Morris Brown College; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Artis P. Graves Professor of Biology 

B.S., Bluefield State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Herman S. Gray Instructor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.A., Washington State University. 

Richard C. Gray Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Michael E. Greene Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Joe Grier Assistant Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Melvin Groomes Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Indiana University; M.S., A. and T. College. 

William Grubbs Assistant Professor of Accounting 

A.B., East Carolina University; M.B.A., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Joseph Gruendler Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Vallie W. Guthrie Assistant Professor of Physical Science 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Fisk University; Ed.D., 
American University. 



Officers of Instruction 405 

*Eleanor Gwynn Instructor of Physical Education 

B.S., Tennessee A. and I. University; M.F.A., University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro. 

Mildred Hannon Instructor, F. D. Bluford Library 

B.A., Bennett College; B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; M.L.S., 
Atlanta University. 

Barbara Y. Hargrave Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Medical College of Virginia. 

Eddie Hargrove Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Estell Harper Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

B. W. Harris Professor and Chairman, Adult Education 

and Community Services 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., North 
Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Wylie Harris Assistant Professor of Health, 

Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Michael R. Harrison Associate Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Arkansas. 

Opal Hawkins Instructor of English 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Georgetown University. 

Alvin E. Headen, Jr Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

W. Floyd Heiney Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Butler University; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

Annie Herbin Instructor of English 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Harvey Hermanson , Associate Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., University of California; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

Robert L. Hester, Jr Assistant Director of Institutional Research 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Herbert Heughan Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Hampton Institute. 

Arthur J. Hicks Chairman, Department of Biology and 

Associate Professor 
B.S., Tougaloo College; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Philip E. Hicks Chairman, Department of Industrial Engineering and 

Professor of Industrial Engineering 
BIE, MSE, University of Florida; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. 

Sandra Hicks Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Curtis Higginbotham Instructor of Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Willie C. High Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

*On leave. 



406 Officers of Instruction 

Alfred Hill Professor of Biology 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.A., Colorado A. and M. College; Ph.D., 
Kansas State University. 

Keith I. Hinch Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Missouri. 

Nancy G. Hinckley Assistant Professor of Safety and Driver Education 

B.A., Trenton State College; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

David Hinton Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., DePaul University. 

Marvin D. Hoch Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., J. D. University of Florida; LLM, New York University. 

Johnny Hodge Assistant Professor 

B.A., North Carolina College at Durham; M.M., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro, Ph.D., American University 

Pauline Holloway Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Allen University; Litt. M., University of Pittsburg. 

Leroy Holmes Chairman and Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., Howard University; A.M., Harvard University. 

Keith E. Hoover Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., University of illinois. 

Robert L. Howard Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Williams College; MBA, University of Chicago. 

Anne T. Howell Instructor of Home Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Hornsby Howell Instructor of Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 
B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

*Pamela Hunter Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Livingstone College; M.Ed., The University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

Ladelle M. Hyman Associate Professor of Accounting and Acting 

Chairman of the Department of Accounting 
B.S., University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff; M.B.A., Marquette University; 
M.A.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., North Texas State University. 

Calvin Irving Associate Professor of Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation 
B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Columbia University. 

Arthur F. Jackson Professor of Psychology and Statistics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Ed. D., Columbia University. 

Sara James Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Virginia State College. 

Norman E. Jarrard Professor of English 

A.B., Salem College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Ph.D., University of Texas. 

James Jenkins Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., N.C. A. and T. State University. 

Junia Jenkins Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Training School for Nurses; B.S., North Carolina College; 
M.S., Boston University. 

*On leave. 



Officers of Instruction 407 

Dong Juen Jeong Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Teachers College, Kyung-Pook National University, Korea; M.A., 
Kyung-Pook National University; M.A., University of Hawaii; Ph.D., Wayne 
State University. 

James P. Jeter Director of Television Studio and Instructor of Speech 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.P.S., Cornell University. 

James C. Johnson Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; J.D., North Carolina Central University. 

Frissell W. Jones Professor of Education and Coordinator of 

Student Teaching and Internships 
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University. 

Lt. Colonel John D. Jones Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Virginia State University; M.S., Atlanta University. 

Wendell P. Jones Professor and Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

David Johnson Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

Jagadish Joshi Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 

B.E., Gujarat University; M.S., Roorkee University; M.S., University of 
Illinois; Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Victor Karabin Instructor of Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 
B.S. Westchester State College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Elliot N. Kent Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Anwar S. Khan Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of the Pubjab; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Alice Kidder Acting Director of the Transportation Institute 

and Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Massachussetts Institute of Technology. 

John M. Kilimanjaro Professor of Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.A., University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff; M.A., Ed.D., University of Ar- 
kansas at Fayetteville. 

Moonok Kim Assistant Professor and Librarian 

B.A., Sookmyong Women's University, Seoul, Korea; M.Ln., Emory Univer- 
sity. 

Lois Kinney Professor of Speech 

B.S., Wilberforce University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

David E. Klett Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Michigan State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Benjamin Koepke Associate Professor of Safety and Driver Education 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Harold Lanier Instructor of Psychology and Guidance 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

William W. Lawrence Associate Professor of Educational Psychology 

and Guidance 
B.S., M.A., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



408 Officers of Instruction 

Valena H. Lee Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Augustine's College; M.S., M.L.S., Indiana University. 

Yvonne Spencer Lee Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Chih Hwa Li Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Chiao Tung University; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence Lipscomb Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., University of Missouri. 

Hattye Liston Associate Professor of Psychology and Guidance 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., New York University; Certificate, Yale 
University. 

Eugene S. Littles Head Basketball Coach 

ABT, High Point College. 

Frances W. Logan Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Social 

Services and Professor of Sociology 
B.S., Ed.M. Temple University; M.S.W., D.S.W., University of Pennsylvania. 

Rabinder Madan Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., St. Stephens College; M.S., Delhi University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 
University. 

Theodore Mahaffey Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Nan P. Manuel Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Morgan State College; M.S., Howard University. 

Eugene Marrow Professor of Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., The Catholic University of America. 

Loreno Marrow Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Jesse E. Marshall Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

and Professor of Guidance 
B.S., Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana 
University. 

Marie E. Martin Instructor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; B.S.N., 
North Carolina Central University; M.P.H., The University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. 

Dorothy Mason Professor of Geography 

A.B., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., University of 
Georgia; Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Benny Mayfield Assistant Director of Admissions 

and Instructor of Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Tuskegee Institute. 

Harold Mazyck, Jr Professor and Chairman of the Department 

of Home Economics 
B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Mansel McCleave Instructor of Horticulture 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Cardoza McCollum Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Cleo M. McCoy Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Paine College; B.D., B.S., Howard University. 



Officers of Instruction 409 

James McCoy Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Helen McCullough Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., St. Augustine's College; M.S., A. 
and T. College. 

William T. McDaniel Chairman, Department of Music and 

Professor of Music 
B.A., Morehouse College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Thomas McFadden Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina College. 

Theresa A. McGready Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., Immaculata College; M.A., M.F.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., 
Ohio University. 

Roger McKee Instructor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

James R. McKinley Head Football Coach 

B.S., Western Michigan University; M.Ed., Eastern Michigan University. 

Marsha Dianne McKoy Instructor of History 

B.S., B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Wayman McLaughlin Professor of History 

A.B., Virginia Union University; B.D., Andover Newton Theological School; 
Ph.D., Boston University. 

Joseph W. McPherson Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Guilford College; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Peter V. Meyers Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Rutger's, The State University. 

*Bertha Miller Instructor of History 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Case Western Reserve University. 

William Mitchell Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., West Virginia State University; M.A., Purdue University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Reginald G. Mitchiner (PE) Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S.M.E., University of 
Illinois, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 

Eddie Steven Mooberry Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Eva Val Moore Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Richard Moore Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Columbia University. 

Roy D. Moore Professor and Chairman, Department of 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

John Morris Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.Ed., North 
Carolina State University. 

W. I. Morris Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

*On leave. 



410 Officers of Instruction 

Murray Neely Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.A., Ohio State University. 

Sarah S. Nelson Assistant Professor of Business Education and 

Administrative Services 
B.S., Allen University; M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

James Nutsch Associate Professor of History 

B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

*Paul Parker Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., A. and T. College; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo. 

William C. Parker Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Ed.D., Indiana. 

Forrest Parks Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Theodore Partrick Professor of History 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., University of Chi- 
cago; B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary; S.T.M., The Graduate School of 
Theology, The University of the South; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Howard Pearsall Professor of Music 

B.S., Fisk University; M.A., Western Reserve University; Ed.D., Indiana 
University. 

ThelmaF. Pearsall Assistant Professor, F. D. Bluford Library 

B.S.\ West Virginia State College; B.S.L.S., M.S.'%estern Reserve Univer- 
sity. 

Alan H. Pearson Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana. 

William Peeler Instructor of Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Wallace Ray Peppers Instructor of English 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Bert C. Piggott Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

Charles W. Pinckney Professor and Director, Division of 

Industrial Education and Technology 
B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., University of Illinois; D.Ed., Penn- 
sylvania State University. 

Melvin Pinckney Instructor of Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation 
B.A., Glassboro State College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State Uni- 
versity. 

Judith W. Pinnix Instructor of Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester; M.C., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Marie Pittman Assistant Professor, F. D. Bluford Library 

B.S.C., North Carolina College; M.S., in L.S., Atlanta University. 

Danny Pogue Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Texas College; M.A., Texas Southern University; Ph.D., The Ohio 
State University. 

*On leave. 



Officers of Instruction 411 

Marguerite Porter Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Allen University; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Patricia Jean Price Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Sarah Price Instructor, F. D. Bluford Library 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., North Carolina College. 

Dorothy Prince Professor and Chairman, Department of Education 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Syracuse University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Gwenella L. Quick Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., The Catholic Univer- 
sity. 

Jothi Ramasamy Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc, Annamalai University, Cdm., India; Ph.D., Kansas State University. 

Glenn F. Rankin Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Professor 

of Agricultural Education 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Russell Rankin Instructor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

William E. Reed Associate Dean for Research and Special Projects 

and Professor of Soil Science 
B.S., Southern University; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Waverlyn N. Rice Professor and Chairman, Department 

of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Morehouse College; Docteurd' Universite, University of Toulouse. 

Lewis Richards Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Leroy Alfred Roberson Instructor of Music and Director of 

University Choir 
B.M., Texas Southern University; M.M., University of Wisconsin. 

Richard Robbins Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D.; North Carolina State University at 
Raleigh. 

Howard Robinson Professor of Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Velma Lee Royall Instructor of Business Education and 

Administrative Services 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.B.E., The University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro. 

Isiah Ruffin Associate Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., The Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. 

Randa Russell Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Kentucky State College; M.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of 
Michigan; M.P.H. University of Minnesota; Ed.D., University of Michigan. 

Emory W. Sadler Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina State University; Ph.D., Emory University. 



412 Officers of Instruction 

*Arthur Saltzman Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Brooklyn College; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Myrtle Sampson Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology 

and Guidance 
B.S., M.L.S., North Carolina Central University; M.A., North Carolina A. 
and T. State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Nathan Sanders Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Thomas Sandin Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Santa Clara; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Stephanie Ann Santmyers Instructor of Art 

B.F.A., Alfred University; M.S., Illinois State University. 

Donald Schaefer Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Lalita Sen Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., University College; M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Chung-Woon Seo Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., The Florida State University. 

Mary F. Shanks Instructor of English 

B.A., Bennett College; M.A., University of Washington. 

Avva Sharma Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Saugor University; D.M.I.T., Madras Institute of Technology; M.S. 
Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Sarla Sharma Professor of Psychology and Guidance 

B.A., Banaras Hindu University; M.A., The University of Chicago; Ph.D., 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

S. J. Shaw Professor and Dean, School of Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.A., North Carolina College; Ph.D., The 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

*Ernest Sherrod Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., A. and T. College. 

Meada G. Shipman Associate Professor of Business Education and 

Administrative Services 
B.S., Allen University; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Anna Simkins Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Michael Simmons Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., Arkansas A.M.&N., M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Amarjit Singh Associate Professor 

of Political Science 
B.A., Punjab University; LL.B., Delhi University; M.E.S., Ph.D., Claremount 
Graduate School. 

William C. Smiley Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E., Jackson State College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Albert E. Smith Professor of Education 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., George Williams Col- 
lege; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 



*On leave. 



Officers of Instruction 413 

Connie O. Smith Assistant Professor and Librarian 

B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.L.S., Rutgers University. 

Sadie Smith Instructor and Librarian 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.L.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 

Myrtle L. Smith Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Ruthena K. Smith Assistant Professor of Sociology / Social Service 

B.S., N.C. A. and T. State University; M.S.W., University of Connecticut. 

Sadie B. Smith Instructor, F.D. Bluford Library 

B.S., N.C. A. and T. State University; MLS, University of Pittsburgh. 

Wilbur L. Smith Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Florentine V. Sowell Professor of Business Education and 

Office Administration 
B.S., University of Nebraska; M.B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Dakota. 

Julia B. Spight Associate Professor of Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., North Carolina College; 
M.S.N., Catholic University. 

Albert W. Spruill Professor of Education and 

Dean of the Graduate School 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ed.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Stewart Stanton Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., University of Idaho. 

Jules Starolitz Assistant Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Roosevelt University. 

Arthur Stevens Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Langston University; M.S., Oklahoma University. 

William A. Streat, Jr Professor and Chairman, 

Department of Architectural Engineering 
B.S., Hampton Institute; B.S., University of Illinois; S.M., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

Veda Stroud Associate Professor of Business Education 

and Office Administration 
B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Virgil Stroud Professor of Political Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

Jan A. Stulinsky Professor of Architectural Engineering 

M.A., Polytechnic University; M.A., University of Capernicus; Doctor of 
Technical Science, Polytechnic University. 

Charles E. Summers Professor of Aerospace Studies 

B.S., N.C. A. and T. State University, M.S., Texas A&M University. 

Ethel F. Taylor Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Spelman College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Arthur S. Totten Associate Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Richard Tucker Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University. 



414 Officers of Instruction 

V. K. Unni Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B. Com. Kerala State, India; M. Com. Christ College, Kerala, India; MBA, 
Atlanta University; DBA, Louisiana Tech University. 

Alphonso Vick Provessor of Biology 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., North Carolina College at Durham; 
A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Marian Vick Professor of Education and Reading 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.S., University of Michigan; C.A.G.S., 
Syracuse University; Ed.D., Duke University. 

Eula Vereen Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Tennessee State; M.S., The University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro. 

Dennis Vetock Instructor of History 

B.A., Pennsylvania Military College; M.A., Rutgers University. 

Carrie Walden Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.A., 
New York University. 

Leon Warren Instructor of Education 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Margaret Warren Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Maryland. 

Katye Watson Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; Certificate, Elliott Pearson Nursery School; Ed.M., 
Tufts University. 

Alfreda Webb Professor of Biology 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; D.V.M., Tuskegee 
Institute. 

Burleigh C. Webb Professor and Dean, School of Agriculture 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Michigan State 
University. 

Sullivan Welborne Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Frank White .... Dean, School of Arts and Sciences, and Professor of History 
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

Gladys White Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Joseph White Professor of Biology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

Katie White Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Dorothy Williams Distinguished Professor of Urban Studies 

B.A., Livingstone College; M.A., Atla'nata University; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California. 

Ellen Williams Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 

Iris Williams Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., North Carolina College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

James Williams, Jr Professor of Biology 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown University. 



Officers of Instruction 415 

Jimmie J. Williams Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Jimmy L. Williams Chairman and Professor of English 

B.A., Clark College; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Joseph Williams Assistant Professor of Health, 

Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.S., North Carolina A. and T. College; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Leo Williams, Jr., P.E Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 

Murdis R. Williams Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Forrist Willis Assistant Professor of Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation 
B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.A., New York University. 

Omega Ray Wilson Coordinator of Mass Communication Program and 

Assistant Professor of Speech 
B.A., Shaw University; M.A., Bowling Green State University. 

Robert Wilson Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Donald Wiseman Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Hiram College; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Joyce M. Woodbury Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Livingston College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Ralph Wooden Professor of Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

James Wooten Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Livingston College; M.A., Columbia Teacher's College. 

Walter G. Wright Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina College. 

Naomi Wynn Dean and Professor, School of Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., M.A., New York. 

Charles Wyrick Associate Professor of English 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., New York University. 

Lee A. Yates Assistant Professor of Plant Science 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Alene C. Young Assistant Professor, F. D. Bluford Library 

A.B., M.L.S., North Carolina College. 

Tommie M. Young Director of Library Services and Professor 

of Education 
B.A., Tennessee State University; M.A.L.S., Peabody College; Ph.D., Duke 
University. 

Chung Yu Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.Eng., McGill University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Carolyn E. Crawford Home Economics 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

C. R. A. Cunnungham Biology 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 



416 Officers of Instruction 

Clarence E. Dean Agricultural Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Iowa State University. 

Donald A. Edwards Physics 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburg. 

Clara V. Evans Home Economics 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Wadaran L. Kennedy Animal Husbandry 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

John C. McLaughlin Economics and Rural Sociology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Samuel C. Smith Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Armand Richardson Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., University of Pittsburg. 

Juanita O. D. Tate Economics 

A.B., M.A., Howard University; Ph.D., New York University. 

Llewellyn A. Wise Business Administration 

B.S.C., New York University; M.A., Atlanta University. 



RELATED SERVICES STAFF 

Alexander, Sabina M., B.S Library Assistant 

Allen, Cecelia, B.S Computer Programmer, Dept. of Economics 

Arledge, Catheryne, B.S Day Care Teacher, Child Development Lab. 

Armstrong, Jacquetta, A.A Library Assistant 

Artis, Charles Educational Media Technician, School of Nursing 

Baker, Anne F., R.N Staff Nurse 

Ball, Brenda Clerk-Steno, School of Agriculture 

Banks, Catherine D., B.S Administrative Secretary, School of Education 

Bannerman, Queen Clerk- Typist, Personnel Office 

Barbee, Mary Q., B.S Clerk, Physical Plant 

Barger, Gail Secretary, Dean of Men 

Barnes, Carolyn, B.A Clerk- Typist, Library 

Barnes, Pamela, B.A Library Clerk 

Bass, Donna Lee, B.S Clerk-Steno, Fiscal Affairs 

Batts, Carolyn, B.S Clerk- Stenographer, Architectural Engineering 

Bell, Bessie, B.S Clerk-Typist, Special Services— UNC-G 

Bellamy, Beverly Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Benjamin, Susan Secretary, Co-operative Education 

Bennerman, Harveita Clerk-Typist, Industrial Technology 

Black, Gwendolyn J Secretary, Legal Assistant to Chancellor 

Blount, W. Archie, Ph.D Director, Institutional Research 

Bonner, Catherine T Administrative Assistant, Director of Athletics 

Bonner, George W., B.S University Residence Administrator 

Boone, Philip D., B.S., M.S University Residence Administrator 



Officers of Instruction 417 

Boone, William, B.S Research Technician, Animal Science Research 

Bowers, Marylou H., B.S., M.S University Residence Counselor 

Bowman, Doris, B.S Secretary, Foreign Languages 

Bradshaw, Kathleen, B.S., M.S Secretary, Department of History 

Brandon, Donald, B.S Laboratories Manager, Biology 

Brandon, Doris, B.S Transcribing Typist, Biology 

Bridges, Nina M Administrative Secretary, Graduate School 

Bright, Nicholas, B.S Photographer, Agricultural Extension 

Brimage, Mavis K., B.S., M.S University Residence Administrator 

Broadnax, Sandra, A.S.S Secretary, Instructional Development 

Brooks, Paulette, B.S Clerk, Adult Education 

Brown, Virginia W., B.S Personnel Assistant 

Bryant, Lillian W Secretary, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 

Bull, Irving S., B.S OSHA Coordinator-Engineer 

Bullock, Geneva C, B.S Assistant Director of Registration & Records 

Bundridge, Charles, B.S., M.S Administrative Officer, 

Research Administration 

Burnette, Dorothy, B.S Secretary, Research Administration 

Bynum, Thomas, B-S Athletic Trainer 

Cain, Gloria V Clerk-Typist, Educational Psychology & Guidance 

Caldwell, Annie P Clerk- Typist, Personnel Office 

Caldwell, Carolyn C, B.S Administrative Assistant, Chancellor Office 

Canada, Doris D., B.S Director of Personnel Services 

Canada, Dorothy S., B.S Accounting Technician, Fiscal Affairs 

Cantrell, Peggy L., R.N Staff Nurse 

Caple, Faye Clerk- Stenographer, Health Services 

Carlson, Bonnie Personnel Assistant, Personnel Office 

Carree, Nancy B Secretary, Special Services — Bennett College 

Cathey, Brenda Clerk- Typist, Registration & Records 

Cathey, Lonnie Jr Data Processor 

Cathey, Denise, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Chambers, Patricia, B.S Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Chapman, Malachi, B.S Accountant, Fiscal Affairs 

Cheek, Loretta Secretary, Registration & Records 

Clark, Dora Clerk-Typist, Student Financial Aid 

Clay, Lynn G Records Clerk, Health Services 

Cole, Ressie, R.N., B.S Staff Nurse 

Colston, Eva R Sales Clerk, Bookstore 

Cook, Sandra Secretary, Department of Art 

Cooper, Barbara Typist, Physical Plant 

Copeland, Dorothy S., B.S. . . . Administrative Secretary, School of Arts & Sc. 

Corbett, Patricia, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Couch, Lillian M., B.S Personnel Technician, Personnel Office 

Cozart, Katie, B.S Administrative Secretary, Adult Education 



418 Officers of Instruction 

Crawford, Albert S., B.S Laundry Manager 

Crawford, Kenneth, B.S Research Assistant, Research Administration 

Crews, Alice Administrative Secretary, School of Agric. 

Crocker, Carolyn, B.S Clerk-Typist, Student Activities 

Cross, Wanda, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Crosson, Carolyn Clerk-Typist, North Carolina Fellows 

Cunningham, Cecelia J., B.S Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Curley, Estelle W., B.S Librarian 

Davis, Dolores Clerk-Typist, Student Financial Aid 

Davis, Edith Accounting Clerk Supervisor, Fiscal Affairs 

Davis, Maxine D., B.S., M.Ed Purchasing Officer 

Dawkins, Virginia E., B.S Library Assistant 

Deloatch, James, B.S Assistant Farm Superintendent 

DeVane, Alicia, B.S., University Residence Assistant 

Dewar, Yvonne P., B.S Clerk-Steno, Budget Office 

Dilligard, Clinton, B.S. . Stock Clerk, Property Management / Inventory Control 

Dick, Martha C, B.S Clerk-Typist, Library 

Dixon, Mosby, B.S., Accountant, Fiscal Affairs 

Donnell, Brinda Clerical Supervisor, Registration & Records 

Donnell, Debbie Clerk- Typist, Contracts and Grants 

Donnell, Minnie Secretary, Physics 

Dorsett, Earla S Secretary, Chemistry Research 

Douglas, Shirley Secretary, Summer School 

Draper, Eleanor B University Residence Assistant 

Eaddy, Nobra Clerk-Steno, Graduate School 

Ervin, Hazel P Secretary, Educational Psychology 

Evans, Margaret L., B.S Payroll Supervisor, Fiscal Affairs 

E wings, Barbara C, B.A Clerk-Typist, Physical Plant 

Faust, Joseph A., B.A Information & Communication Specialist, 

Public Information 

Faust, Margaret, B.A Student Center Program Director, Student Union 

Fields, Linda, B.S Clerk-Steno, Student Affairs 

Finley, Grace Secretary, Director of Student Union 

Fletcher, Joan T., A.A.S Secretary, Aerospace Studies 

Flowers, Raymond, B.A University Residence Assistant 

Ford, Helen University Residence Assistant 

Foster, Annie G., B.S Administrative Sec, Vice-Chancellor- Acad. Affairs 

Fox, Bobby, B.S Clerk-Typist, Student Financial Aid 

Fuller, Julene C Research Asst., Specialist Services — Bennett College 

Gales, Evelyn Clerk-Steno, Fiscal Affairs 

Galloway, Wanda Clerk-Steno, Math Dept. & AIDP 

Garfield, James E., B.S., M.S Director of Auxiliary Services 

Gayle, Cislyn M Data Processor 

German, Peggie, B.S Clerk-Steno, Accounting 

Ghee, Linda Y Data Processing Coordinator, Registration & Records 



Officers of Instruction 419 

Gill, Jacqueline, B.S Secretary, Audio Visual Aid 

Gill, Joyce, B.S Secretary, Political Science Dept. 

Goins, Carmen Food Service Supervisor 

Goldston, Henry, B.S Laboratories Manager, Chemistry 

Graeber, Marvin B., B.S., M.S Associate Director of Physical Plant 

Grandison, Louise, B.S Administrative Secretary, 

Vice Chancellor of Planning 

Grandy, Ruth D., B.S Clerk-Steno, Dept. of Agricultural Education 

Graves, Edna K., B.S. . . . Administrative Assistant, Research Administration 

Graves, Inett W., A.A.S Clerk-Steno, Department of Education 

Graves, Melvine, B.S Secretary, Office of Administrative 

Assistant to Chancellor 

Gray, Gerard E., B.S., M.S Director, Physical Plant 

Gray, Josephine A Statistical Aide, Library 

Groome, Robert University Laboratory Manager, Industrial Techn'gy 

Guest, Georgia, B.S Clerk- Typist, Electrical Engineering 

Gulati, Jagjit, B.A., MA Computer Operator Manager 

Gulley, Lawrence, B.S Internal Auditor, Fiscal Affairs 

Hall, Lula S Sales Manager, Bookstore 

Harper, Carrie W., B.S Administrative Officer, Student Financial Aid 

Harris, Clyde O., B.S University Residence Assistant 

Harris, Ellamae, B.S Secretary, Business Education & Adm. Services 

Harris, Mae R Accounting Clerk, Cashier's Office 

Harrison, Vivian Clerk, Physical Plant 

Havner, Lauretta G Library Assistant 

Haynes, Mary C, B.S. . Clerk-Typist, Property Management/ Inventory Control 

Headen, Janice Secretary, Industrial Technology 

Hicks, Zebedee, B.S Laboratories Manager, Engineering 

Hill, William, B.S Laboratories Manager, Engineering 

Hines, Genevieve Clerk- Typist, Plant & Animal Science 

Hinson, Brenda, B.S Clerk- Typist, Plant Science 

Hodge, Irvin, B.S University Engineer, Physical Plant 

Hoffler, Denise, B.S Secretary, Economics Department 

Holley, Betty Accounting Clerk, Fiscal Affairs 

Holloway, Eula, B.S Secretary, Director of Placement 

Howell, Fleetwood Sales Manager, Bookstore 

Hudgins, Eula S., B.S., M.S Librarian 

Hughes, Gloria Key Punch Operator 

Hunter, Barbara Payroll Clerk 

Ingram, Charles University Residence Assistant 

Ingram, Kaye Library Clerk 

Ivey, Oliver, B.S Clerk, Property Management/ Inventory Control 

Jackson, Fred L., B.S Director of Accounting, Fiscal Affairs 

Jarrell, Katherine Library Clerk 

Jeffries, Gladys D., B.S University Admissions Representative 



420 Officers of Instruction 

Johnson, Debra, B.S Clerk-Steno, Agricultural Extension 

Johnson, Deloris Clerk- Typist, School of Nursing 

Johnson, Deola Accounting Clerk Supervisor, Cashier's Office 

Johnson, Elloise, B.S Clerk-Steno, Secondary Education 

Jones, Bertha H Day Care Teacher, Child Development Lab 

Jones, Denise University Residence Assistant 

Jones, Joyce, B.S Public Information Assistant 

Jones, Ruby W., B.S Director of Contracts & Grants 

Jones, Sylvia D., B.S Clerk- Typist, Athletics 

Kearney, Gladys Secretary, Counseling & Testing 

Kimber, Odessa Secretary, Physical Plant 

Largent, Henrietta Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Leacraft, Paul, B.S., M.S Laboratories Manager, Physics 

Lee, Barbara Secretary, Economics 

Lee, Valmarie Clerk- Typist, Library 

LeGrand, Loretta W Secretary, Air Force ROTC 

Lett, Peggie Clerk-Steno, School of Nursing 

Lewis, Delphina A Library Clerk 

Lightford, Dorothy S., B.S Accounting Clerk, Library 

Livingston, Deborah T., B.S Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Loftin, Guy, B.S., M.S Electronics Technician, TV. Center 

Logan, Marion T., B.S., M.S University Admissions Recruiter 

Lomax, Arthelia Secretary, Cashier's Office 

Maleski, Stanley, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Marks, Mary K University Residence Administrator 

Martin. Harold L., B.S Farm Superintendent 

Martin, Phyllis F Key Punch Operator 

Matier, Mae C., B.S Library Technical Assistant 

Meachem, James, B.S Manager, Bookstore 

Middleton, Yvonne, B.S. . . . Reading Room Supervisor, Business & Economics 

Miller, Barbara B., B.S Clerk-Typist, Library 

Miller, Patricia H Accounting Clerk, Bookstore 

Miller, Shirley A., B.S Clerk-Typist, Fiscal Affairs 

Miller, Tyrone, B.S Production Technician, AVA Center 

Mitchell, Christine University Residence Assistant 

Moore, Gwendolyn Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Mooring, Willie J., B.S System Analyst, Computer Center 

Morgan, Dorothy, B.S Secretary, Home Economics 

Morgan, Mazer L Clerk-Typist, Title IX 

Morris, Frank, B.S Administrative Assistant, Alumni Affairs 

McKeathen, Evelyn, B.S Clerk-Typist, School of Business & Economics 

McKee, Hilda Library-Clerk 

McKee, Roger N., B.S., M.S Associate Director, Student Union 

McKoy, Katie, B.S Clerk-Steno, Chancellor's Office 



Officers of Instruction 421 

McKoy, Luvater, B.S University Residence Assistant 

McLaughlin, Pauline, B.S., M.S Counselor, Testing & Counseling 

McLendon, Sitrena Secretary, Math. Department 

McMillan, Jacqueline, B.S.. . Accounting Clerk, Development & Univ. Relations 

McMillan, Norwood, B.S Security & Traffic Director 

Nash, Medeline H Library Assistant 

Neal, Joyce G., B.S Administrative Secretary, School of Engineering 

Nesbitt, Myrtle L., B.S University Residence Administrator 

Nettles, Saundra L., B.S Clerk-Steno, Vice Chancellor- Academic Affairs 

Newman, Euthena, B.A Library Clerk 

Owens, Carol J Accounting Technician, Fiscal Affairs 

Owens, Phyllis, A.A.S Secretary, Biology 

Page, Doris D., B.S Secretary, Physical Education 

Parker, Katrina, B.S Receptionist, Student Union 

Parker, Rosalyn Clerk-Typist, School of Engineering 

Patterson, Jewell Clerk- Typist, Student Affairs 

Peay, Gloria D Programmer, Computer Center 

Pettiford, Callie University Residence Assistant 

Phoenix, Gloria, B.A., MA Analyst Programmer, Planning 

Pinnix, Charles S Laboratories Manager, Mech. Engineering 

Poole, Correne A., B.S Library Assistant 

Posey, Patricia A Secretary, Education Department 

Potts, Gracie B Secretary, Music 

Purnell, Ernestine K., B.S Accounting Clerk, Personnel Office 

Purnell, J. Ray Stock Clerk, Bookstore 

Randall, Iris Clerk-Typist, Sociology / Social Welfare 

Ray, Brenda Administrative Assistant, Stud. Financial Aid 

Reid, Evelyn '..... Secretary, English Department 

Reid, Rubye, B.S Research Asst., Special Services 

Richards, Sharon, B.S Secretary, Placement 

Richmond, Ruth Clerk-Steno, Research Administration 

Riddick, Audrey, B.S Accounting Technician, Student Financial Aid 

Roberson, Andrea Payroll Clerk, Fiscal Affairs 

Robinson, Gloria Clerk-Steno, School of Arts & Science 

Robinson, Marilyn Secretary, Animal Science Research 

Saunders, Sharon M., A.A.S Secretary, T. V. Center 

Scales, Connie, B.S Clerk- Typist, Bursar's Office 

Settle, Paulette, B.A Clerk-Typist, Foreign Student Advisor 

Shaw, Beatrice, B.A Clerk, Research Administration 

Shelton, Christine, B.S Administrative Secretary, Fiscal Affairs 

Shepard, Edgar, B.S Bursar 

Shepherd, Shirley Clerk- Typist, Auxiliary Services 

Sibert, James, B.S., M.S Counselor, Counseling & Testing 

Sides, Tylea D., B.S., M.S Clerk- Typist, Admissions 



422 Officers of Instruction 

Siler, Vanessa, A.A.S Clerk-Steno, Planning 

Simmons, Margaret, B.S Cashier, Bursar's Office 

Simmons, William Library Clerk 

Simpson, Annie R., B.S University Residence Administrator 

Sims, Geraldine, B.S Administrative Officer, Bursar's Office 

Singletary, Alice J., B.S Clerk-Steno, Driver Education 

Small, Angus, B.S Director, Computer Science Center 

Smith, Bertha H., B.S Secretary, Industrial Technology 

Smith, Fannie, B.S University Residence Administrator 

Smith, J. Clinton, B.S., R.N Staff Nurse 

Smith, Jonah, B.S Accountant, Fiscal Affairs 

Smith, Linda Secretary, Agricultural Extension 

Smith, Mary D., B.S University Residence Supervisor 

Smith, Nancy J Secretary, School of Education 

Smith, Vivian, B.A Secretary, Agricultural Extension 

Spady, Lillian Secretary, Transportation 

Spinks, Cynthia N Secretary, Speech Communication 

Spruiell, Linda, B.A Secretary, Agricultural Extension 

Stafford, Florine I., B.S Library Technical Assistant 

Staton, Jerline, R.N Staff Nurse 

Steadman, James, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Stewart, Ardie Clerk- Typist, Fiscal Affairs 

Stinson, Jacqueline University Residence Assistant 

Strayhorn, Gwendolyn, B.S Clerk- Typist, Student Financial Aid 

Suggs, Jannette, B.S Secretary, School of Business & Economics 

Swann, Angela, B.A., MA University Residence Assistant 

Sweeney, Marilyn Clerk-Steno, English 

Tate, Ronnie, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Taylor, Evelyn A Administrative Assistant, Physical Plant 

Terry, Cynthia, A.A.S Secretary, Mass Communications 

Thompson, Allie, B.S Library Assistant 

Thompson, Cheryl Clerk- Typist, Urban Studies 

Thompson, Ernestine Research Assistant, Veterans' Affairs 

Thompson, Lynda Clerk-Steno, Agricultural Extension 

Thompson, Mary L., B.S Librarian 

Thornton, Laura M., B.S Acting University Director of Food Services 

Tillman, Mae, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Tillman, Rosa C Secretary, Institutional Research 

Tonkins, Daisy Secretary, Electrical Engineering 

Toon, James A., B.S University Residence Assistant 

Triplin, Mary Clerk-Typist, Registration & Records 

Turner, Shirley, B.S Administrative Secretary, Student Affairs 

Underwood, Deborah, B.S Secretary, Transportation 

Vines, Ronald, B.S University Residence Assistant 



Officers of Instruction 423 

Vines, Thelma W., B.S., R.N Student Health Administrator, Infirmary 

Waddell, Peggie, R.N , Nurse Supervisor 

Walker, Daisy, B.S Secretary, Department of Education 

Wallace, Ethel, B.S Secretary, Special Services 

Wallace, Latham, B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Wallington, Annie, B.S Secretary, Chemistry 

Warren, Geraldine, B.S Clerk-Steno, Army ROTC 

Watlington, Carolyn, B.S Accountant, Fiscal Affairs 

Watlington, Marva L., B.S., M.S University Residence Counselor 

Watson, Arneatha, B.S Accounting Clerk, Bursar 

Watson, Lena Secretary, Architectural Engineering 

Watson, Merrill Chief, Heating Plant 

Wheeler, Brenda Secretary, Director of Physical Plant 

White, James I University Residence Administrator 

White, Kaye B Clerk-Steno, Counseling & Testing 

White, Marjorie H., B.S Administrative Officer, Institutional Research 

White, Ovid A., B.S Computer Operator 

Whitelow, Onnie, B.S. . . Administrative Secretary to Dean, School of Nursing 

Wideman, Addie, B.S University Residence Assistant 

Williams, Alice, B.S Secretary to Librarian. 

Williams, Joseph, B.S. ., University Residence Assistant 

Williams, Robert A., B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Williams, Shekkita Duplicating Equipment Operator, Print Shop 

Wilson, Michelle Administrative Assistant to Director of 

Transportation Institute 

Wise, Joseph B Computer Operator 

Wong, M. Caroline Secretary to Chairman of Sociology / Social Welfare 

Wooten, Marteena B., B.S., M.S. . . Administrative Secretary, Dean of Women 

Wright, Carolyn C, B.S Secretary, Computer Science 

Young, Nancy H., A.B University Residence Assistant 



N.C. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 
A. & T. STATE UNIVERSITY— COLTRANE HALL 

D. D. Godfrey Assistant Director 

D. H. McAfee Administrative Program Assistant 

Miss Pamela S. Cutright Clothing Specialist 

J. L. Richardson Community Development Specialist 

Mrs. Jewell P. Aberi Associate Home Economic Extension Agent 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Hearne Home Economic Extension Agent 

Mrs. Ellen P. Smoak Assistant Home Economic Extension Agent 

J. M. Walker Family Resource Management Specialist 

Mrs. Josephine W. Patterson District Home Economics Agent 

Mrs. Wilda F. Wade Foods and Nutrition Specialist 



424 Officers of Instruction 

*Clyde E. Chesney 4-H Specialist (Recreation) 

T. W. Flowers Extension Horticulture Specialist 

J. O. Garner Extension Horticulture Specialist 

Miss Thelma J. Feaster 4-H Specialist (Special Needs Project) 

Miss Cynthia E. Johnson Human Development Specialist 

Henry Revell 4-H Specialist 

Miss Elynor A. Williams Extension Communications Specialist 

Mrs. Sheilda B. McDowell Home Economic Extension Agent 4-H 

Mrs. Geraldine H. Ray Home Economic Extension Agent Clothing 

Mrs. Mary B. Robbins Assistant Home Economics Extension Agent 

(Foods & Nutrition) 

Mrs. Shirley B. Rouse Assistant Extension Agent 4-H 

Nicholas S. Bright Photographer 

Mrs. Roberta M. Bruton Secretary, Assistant Director & 

Associate Dean 

Carolyn R. Corbett Secretary, District Home Economics 

Agents and Accounting Clerk 

Mrs. Vivian E. Smith Secretary, Horticulture Specialist 4-H Agent 

Miss Linda Sprueil Secretary, 4-H and Foods and Nutrition Specialist 

Miss Delores McRae Secretary, Administrative Assistant and 

Communications Specialist 

Miss Linda H. Smith Secretary, 4-H Specialists and Home 

Economics Agents 
Miss Lynda M. Thompson Stenographer 



*On Leave 



Enrollment 



425 



ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA 
1976-77 



Alamance 113 

Alexander 2 

Alleghany 1 

Anson 18 

Avery 1 

Beaufort 31 

Bertie 50 

Bladen 55 

Brunswick 22 

Buncombe 44 

Burke 20 

Cabarrus 14 

Caldwell 23 

Carteret 15 

Caswell 33 

C atawba 26 

Chatham 35 

Chowan 11 

Cleveland 18 

Columbus 48 

Craven 55 

Cumberland 176 

Currituck 1 

Dare 2 

Davidson 70 

Davie 7 

Duplin 61 

Durham 106 

Edgecombe 61 

Forsyth 268 

Franklin 24 

Gaston 57 

Gates 8 

Granville 27 

Greene 19 

Guilford 1377 

Halifax 88 

Harnett 30 

Haywood 4 

Henderson 2 

Hertford 60 

Hoke 22 

Iredell 27 

Johnston 22 

Jones 27 



Lee 18 

Lenoir 24 

Lincoln 6 

Martin 39 

McDowell 6 

Mecklenburg 123 

Mitchell 1 

Montgomery 35 

Moore 27 

Nash 41 

New Hanover 25 

Northampton 74 

Onslow 42 

Orange 53 

Pamlico 12 

Pasquotank 12 

Pender 25 

Perquimans 3 

Person 40 

Pitt 102 

Polk 4 

Randolph 33 

Richmond 29 

Robeson 56 

Rockingham 87 

Rowan 44 

Rutherford 9 

Sampson 76 

Scotland 34 

* Stanly 18 

Stokes 12 

Surry 11 

Transylvania 1 

Tyrrell 3 

Union 11 

Vance 23 

Wake 107 

Warren 38 

Washington 10 

Watauga 1 

Wayne 95 

Wilkes 8 

Wilson 58 

Yadkin 4 

TOTAL 4661 



426 



Enrollment 



ENROLLMENT BY STATES 
1976-77 



Alabama 14 

Alaska 1 

Arizona 1 

Arkansas 3 

California 6 

Connecticut 36 

Delaware 12 

District of Columbia 55 

Florida 19 

Georgia 23 

Illinois 5 

Indiana 1 

Kansas 1 

Kentucky 2 

Louisiana 1 

Maine 1 

Maryland 58 

Massachusetts 7 

Michigan 7 



Minnesota 1 

Mississippi 2 

Missouri 3 

New Hampshire 1 

New Jersey 74 

New York 99 

Ohio 11 

Oregon 1 

Pennsylvania 52 

Rhode Island 2 

South Carolina 127 

South Dakota 2 

Tennessee 5 

Texas 1 

Virginia 112 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 3 

Territories 1 

Foreign 103 

TOTAL 854 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 
1976-77 



Fifth Year 1 

Senior Class 622 

Junior Class 852 

Sophomore Class 1161 



Advanced Freshmen Class 
Freshman Class 
Special Students 
Graduate Students 
TOTAL 


864 

1254 

54 

707 
5515 



Index 

INDEX 



427 



Academic Information and 

Regulations 
Academic Retention 
Accounting 
Accreditations and Instutitional 

Memberships 
Administration, Officers of 
Admission 

Admission, Conditional 
Admission, Freshmen 
Admission, Graduate School 
Admission, Policy and 

Procedure 
Admission to Graduate Study 
Admission, Transfer 
Adult Education and Community 

Services, Department of 
Aerospace Studies 
Agricultural Economics 
Agricultural and Extension Education 
Agricultural Science 
Agriculture, School of 
Animal Science, Department of 
Architectural Engineering, 

Department of 
Art, Department of 
Arts and Sciences, School of 
Audiovisual Center 
Auditing a Course 



B 



Double Major 



22 



Bacteriology 

Biology, Department of 

Botany 

Buildings, University 

Business Administration 

Business Education and 

Administrative Services 
Business and Economics, 

School of 



Calendar, University 

Changes in Schedules 

Changing Schools 

Chemistry 

Child Development 

Center for Manpower Research 

and Training 
Class Attendance 
Classification of Students 
Closed Circuit Television 
Clothing, Textiles and 

Related Art 
Computer Science Center 
Cooperative Education 
Course Credit by Examination 
Course Loads 

Course Numbers and Classification 
Courses of Study 
Course Repeat Rule 
Counseling Services 
Credentials, Filing of 



D 



Dairy Science 
Degree Programs 



21 


Driver Education 


339 


24 


Development and University Relations, 




240 


Office of 


31 


9 
ii, 5 


E 




16 


Early Childhood Education 


278 


14 


Economics, Department of 


259 


13 


Educational Psychology and Guidance 


295 


13 


Education, School of 


271 




Education, Department of 


278 


12 


Educational Media, Department of 


292 


13 


Electrical Engineering 


355 


13 


Emeritus, Officer 


7 




Engineering, Architectural 


348 


299 


Engineering, Electrical 


355 


394 


Engineering, Industrial 


358 


42 


Engineering, Mechanical 


359 


47 


Engineering Physics 


00 


84 


Engineering, School of 


345 


39 


English, Department of 


139 


51 


Enrollment Summaries 


426 




Entrance Units 


13 


348 






108 


F 




103 






29 


Faculty Emeriti 


415 


19 


Fees, Required Fees, Deposits & Charges 


17 




Fees, Summer School 


18 




Fees, Veterans 


21 




Financial Information 


16 


121 


Food and Nutrition 


63 


117 


Foreign Languages, Department of 


151 


121 


Food Services 


33 


7 


French 


152 


244 


G 




252 








General Requirements for Graduation 


27 


237 


. Geography 


166 




German 


156 




Governors, Board of 


ix 




Grade Points 


24 


36 


Grade Point Ratio 


25 


25 


Grading System 


23 


26 


Graduate School 


379 


127 


Graduation Under a Given Catalogue 


28 


67 


Graduation with Honors 


28 




Greensboro Regional Consortium 


32 


31 
27 
25 


Guidance and Counseling Services 


32 


H 




29 








Health Education 


307 


62 


Health Services 


32 


30 


Historical Statement 


3 


32 


History 


157 


23 


Home Economics, Department of 


61 


22 


Home Economics Education 


69 


25 


Honor Roll 


27 


21 


Housing 


34 


00 


Humanities 


150 


32 






15 


I 






Incompletes 


26 




Industrial Arts 


317 


58 


Industrial Education 


317 


10 


Industrial Education, Vocation 


319 



428 



Index 



Industrial Engineering, Department of 
Industrial Technology, Department of 
Institute for Research in 

Human Resources 
Institutional Memberships 



M 

Mathematics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Memberships, Institutional 
Memorial Union 
Military Science 
Music, Applied 
Music, Department of 
Music, Education 
Music, Literature 



Nondiscrimination Policy 
Nursing, School of 



358 
327 



Landscape Architecture 


97 


Language and Composition 


143 


Language Laboratory 


30 


Late Registration 


22 


Library 


29 


Literature 


145 


Loan Fund, Student 


16 


Loan Program, National Defense 




Student Loan 


16 


Loan, North Carolina Rural Rehabilitation 




Student Loan Program 


17 


Location of the University 


7 



167 
359 
9 
33 
387 
179 
176 
180 
182 



12 
371 



R 



Reading Center 30 

Readmission of Former Students 15 

Recreation 305 

Refunds 20 

Registration 22 

Related Services Staff 416 

Repetition of Courses 22 

Required Fees, Deposits and Charges 17 

Residence Status for Tuition Payment 16 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 387 

Residence Halls 8 

Rural Sociology 46 

Russian 157 



Schedule, Changes in 25 

Scholastic Requirements 24 
Secondary School Teachers, Education of 273 

Semester Examinations 26 

Social Service 222 

Sociology 221 

Soil Science 95 

Spanish 155 

Special Fees and Deposits 19 

Special Notice to Veterans 21 

Special Students 15 
Speech Communication and Theater Arts, 

Department of 226 

Student Conduct 35 

Student Life 34 

Student Personnel Services 34 

Students, Classification of 25 

Students, Transfer 14 

Students, Visiting 15 



Officers of Administration 5 

Officers of Instruction 399 

Official Registration 22 

Organizations and Activities, Student 34 



Teacher Education, Admission and 

Retention Standards 
Teacher Education, Program of 
Transcripts, Obtaining 
Transportation Institute 
Trustees, Board of 
Tuition, Fees and Charges 



U 



276 

273 

28 

31 

5 

17 



Payment of Fees, Veterans 


21 


Unit Requirements 


Physical Education, Health and 






Recreation, Department of 


303 


V 


Physical Plant 


7 




Physics 


194 


Veterans Affairs and Services 


Physics, Engineering 


196 




Placement Service 


33 


W 


Plant Science and Technology, 






Department of 


83 


Withdrawal from University 


Political Science, Department of 


203 




Poultry Science 


59 


Z 


Preregistration 


21 




Psychology, Department of 


210 


Zoology 



13 



33 



26 



122 




MANCHESTER 
DIANA 46962